How Asthma Inhalers Are Choking the Planet

If there is any field of science that understands the doctrine of unintended consequences, it’s medicine. We rely on antibiotics to wipe out infections, and in the process breed a class of superbugs resistant to the drugs. We develop powerful medications that can control chronic pain, and in the U.S., have a nationwide addiction crisis to show for that breakthrough. Now, it appears, we can add asthma control to the list pharmaceutical blowbacks we didn’t see coming. According to a new study published in BMJ Open, the familiar lightweight, pocket-sized aerosolized inhalers that make breathing easier for so many of the 235 million people worldwide who suffer from asthma may be choking the planet on a powerful greenhouse gas they release in the process. The study, led by Dr. Alexander JK Wilkinson, a respiratory specialist with Britain’s National Health Service, focused on the 4.67 million people diagnosed with asthma in the United Kingdom, but it has implications for treatment worldwide, including in the U.S., where 22.6 million people (6.1 million of them children) are afflicted with the condition. The researcher compared the greenhouse gas emissions of aerosol pumps—known as metered dose inhalers (MDI)—with dry powder inhalers (DPI), which are shaped something like a hockey puck and are activated simply by inhaling. The two weren’t even close. The problem with MDIs is not carbon dioxide (the most common greenhouse gas), but rather methane...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Asthma Carbon Dioxide climate change Environment greenhouse gasses MDI methane Source Type: news

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Authors: Ring B, Burbank AJ, Mills K, Ivins S, Dieffenderfer J, Hernandez ML Abstract Objectives: Objective measurements of asthma impairment could aid teens in recognition of changes in asthma status over time. Ready access to a conventional spirometer is not realistic outside of the clinical setting. In this proof-of-concept study, we compared the performance of the VitalFlo mobile spirometer to the nSpire KoKo® sx1000 spirometer for accuracy in measuring Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1) and Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) in adolescents with asthma.Methods: Two hundred forty pulmonary function measu...
Source: Journal of Asthma - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: J Asthma Source Type: research
ConclusionThe changes in functional connectivity and structural connectivity within the DMN attributed to WMH progression were responsible for the development of cognitive impairment.
Source: NeuroImage: Clinical - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
AbstractDiseases of the foot and ankle are common but relatively difficult to diagnose because of the complexity of the anatomy and the frequent occurrence of multiple diseases at the same time. For these reasons, management of chronic foot pain is often clinically challenging. MRI is the imaging modality of choice in many types of diseases causing chronic foot pain, due to high resolution and excellent soft tissue contrast. However, in the postoperative state, the use of MRI can be limited by artifact from metallic devices, and it may be difficult to confirm whether the pathology detected on the MRI is the actual cause of...
Source: Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging - Category: Nuclear Medicine Source Type: research
British Journal of Cancer, Published online: 09 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41416-019-0674-4Results of a phase II clinical trial of 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) and methotrexate in patients with BRCA-defective tumours
Source: British Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur results suggest that hyperostosis of the posterior longitudinal ligament in OPLL may not be associated with bone strength and bone mineral status at the extremities.
Source: Osteoporosis International - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe factors associated positively with DKT were duration after surgery, improvement of physical activities, mobility, alleviation of pain, and patient satisfaction.
Source: Journal of Public Health - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
Kasak Jan Tkac The study describes development of a glycan biosensor for detection of a tumor-associated antibody. The glycan biosensor is built on an electrochemically activated/oxidized graphene screen-printed electrode (GSPE). Oxygen functionalities were subsequently applied for covalent immobilization of human serum albumin (HSA) as a natural nanoscaffold for covalent immobilization of Thomsen-nouvelle (Tn) antigen (GalNAc-O-Ser/Thr) to be fully available for affinity interaction with its analyte—a tumor-associated antibody. The step by step building process of glycan biosensor development was comprehe...
Source: Sensors - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe purpose of this review is to provide the readers with current information and state-of-the-art of digital scanning systems within the orthodontics. Introducing the commercially available intraoral and facial scanning systems, as well as bringing future perspectives to these systems.Recent FindingsThe emergence of digital scanners associated with computer-aided design is one of today ’s key diagnostic tool enhancements in orthodontics. Among the main applications in orthodontics, it is the analysis for diagnosis, treatment planning, and prediction of the final result. There is a range of p...
Source: Current Oral Health Reports - Category: Dentistry Source Type: research
If there is any field of science that understands the doctrine of unintended consequences, it’s medicine. We rely on antibiotics to wipe out infections, and in the process breed a class of superbugs resistant to the drugs. We develop powerful medications that can control chronic pain, and in the U.S., have a nationwide addiction crisis to show for that breakthrough. Now, it appears, we can add asthma control to the list pharmaceutical blowbacks we didn’t see coming. According to a new study published in BMJ Open, the familiar lightweight, pocket-sized aerosolized inhalers that make breathing easier for so many ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Asthma Carbon Dioxide climate change Environment greenhouse gasses MDI methane Source Type: news
If there is any field of science that understands the doctrine of unintended consequences, it’s medicine. We rely on antibiotics to wipe out infections, and in the process breed a class of superbugs resistant to the drugs. We develop powerful medications that can control chronic pain, and in the U.S., have a nationwide addiction crisis to show for that breakthrough. Now, it appears, we can add asthma control to the list pharmaceutical blowbacks we didn’t see coming. According to a new study published in BMJ Open, the familiar lightweight, pocket-sized aerosolized inhalers that make breathing easier for so many ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Asthma Carbon Dioxide climate change Environment greenhouse gasses MDI methane Source Type: news
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