MRI may help doctors differentiate causes of memory loss

A UCLA-led study has found that MRI scans can help doctors distinguish whether a person ’s memory loss is being caused by Alzheimer’s disease or by traumatic brain injury.The study, which also involved researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, is important because it could help prevent doctors from misdiagnosing Alzheimer ’s disease — a diagnosis that can be devastating for patients and their families, and can prevent them from receiving appropriate treatment. (A 2016 study by researchers affiliated with the University of Toronto found that up to 21 percent of older adults with dementia may be misdiagnosed with Alzheimer ’s.)The current study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer ’s disease, involved 40 patients whose average age was just under 68 and who were being treated by UCLA neurologists. All of the patients had suffered traumatic brain injury and later developed memory problems.“We already knew that MRIs can reveal subtle abnormalities in patients with neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer’s,” said Dr. Somayeh Meysami, the study’s lead author and a postdoctoral clinical research fellow in cognitive and behavioral neurology at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether MRI also could reveal distinct abnormalities in traumatic brain injury. And, if we could identify such a pattern, it would lead to improved diagnosis of TBI-related memory lo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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After spending 30 minutes hunting for your car in a parking lot, or getting lost on a familiar route, have you ever considered asking your doctor for a blood test or brain scan to find out if you have Alzheimer’s disease? A number of factors contribute to Alzheimer’s disease. By definition, this form of dementia involves the buildup of a protein in brain called beta-amyloid. Beta-amyloid forms plaques that disrupt communication between brain cells, and ultimately destroys them. For this reason, tests for Alzheimer’s disease focus on beta-amyloid. Blood tests for Alzheimer’s disease are being develop...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Healthy Aging Memory Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CNN) — After examining the brains of former professional football players, researchers might be a step closer to diagnosing the devastating brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy in the living, according to a study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. The researchers utilized PET imaging to find tau, an abnormal protein that’s a signature indicator of CTE, using a radioactive drug or tracer called flortaucipir. The researchers imaged the brains of 26 living former football players and compared them with the brains of 31 people with no history of traumatic brain injury. (WBZ-TV) Th...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health CNN CTE Source Type: news
After he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2016, Peter Wooding says he and his wife JoAnn decided they wanted to be “part of the solution” in finding the first effective treatment for the neurodegenerative disease. He volunteered to be part of a trial for a promising new drug called aducanumab. While there is still no effective treatment for Alzheimer’s, in early studies aducanumab melted away the amyloid protein plaques that are the hallmark of the brain disorder. And people taking the drug showed improvements in some of their thinking skills. But last week, the drug’s developers, Bio...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs onetime Source Type: news
In this study, we show that calorie restriction is protective against age-related increases in senescence and microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of aging. Further, these protective effects mitigated age-related decline in neuroblast and neuronal production, and enhanced olfactory memory performance, a behavioral index of neurogenesis in the SVZ. Our results support the concept that calorie restriction might be an effective anti-aging intervention in the context of healthy brain aging. Greater Modest Activity in Late Life Correlates with Lower Incidence of Dementia ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The research community has moved quite determinedly these past few years towards practical, low-cost tests for early Alzheimer's disease. Even with the limited means available to patients today, an early warning might be used to delay the aggregation of amyloid-β that takes place in the initial stages of the condition, before the appearance of cognitive impairment. Lifestyle changes such as weight loss and improved fitness, antiviral therapies, and control of chronic inflammation should all make some difference, given what is known of the mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease. Looking ahead, better options may soon be ava...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis on these individuals lead to several interesting observations together suggesting that AD risk factors comprise a network of interlocking feedback loops that may be modifiable. Our findings indicate previously unidentified connectivity between AD risk factors, suggesting that treatment regimens should be tailored to the individual and multi-modal to simultaneously return several risk factors to a normative state. If successfully performed, the possibility to slow progression of AD and possibly reverse aspects of cognitive decline may become achievable. PMID: 30338750 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Aging Science - Category: Geriatrics Tags: Curr Aging Sci Source Type: research
This study is part of a growing body of research that suggests a sleep-deprived brain might be more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease. Animal studies have shown levels of plaque-forming A-beta plummet during sleep. Other research points to the fact that a sleeping brain runs the “clean cycle” (a reference to a dishwasher) to remove the day’s metabolic debris, specifically A-beta plaques. A study done in 2017 found that even one sleepless night appears to leave behind an excess of the troublesome protein fragment. While this is all impressive research, scientists believe there are still plenty of gap...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Research Sleep Alzheimer's disease Dementia Source Type: blogs
There hasn’t been much good news lately on the Alzheimer’s drug front, with a number of companies either abandoning their Alzheimer’s research efforts or stopping studies of experimental medications. Over the summer, Eli Lilly and AstraZeneca PLC terminated their development of an experimental treatment when studies failed to show improvement in people with early signs of cognitive impairment. In January, Pfizer closed its neurodegenerative disease research, and a month later, Merck stopped development of its Alzheimer’s drug candidate after disappointing results. But at the annual meeting of the Al...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news
In this study, senescent cell distribution and quantity in vastus lateralis muscle were examined in young human adults after a single bout of resistance exercise. To determine the effects of dietary protein availability around exercise on senescent cell quantity and macrophage infiltration of skeletal muscle, two isocaloric protein supplements (14% and 44% in calorie) were ingested before and immediately after an acute bout of resistance exercise, in a counter-balanced crossover fashion. An additional parallel trial was conducted to compare the outcome of muscle mass increment under the same dietary conditions after 12 wee...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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