Insomniacs may be at greater risk of heart failure, study finds

People genetically predisposed to sleep problems have greater risk of stroke and coronary artery diseasePeople who struggle with sleep might be at greater risk of developing cardiovascular problems, research suggests.Scientists have found that people who are genetically predisposed to insomnia have a greater risk of heart failure, stroke and coronary artery disease.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sleep Health & wellbeing Life and style Science Heart disease Stroke UK news Society Source Type: news

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This study aimed to compare short- and long-term results for patients undergoing either aortic valve-sparing reimplantation (David) procedure (AVr-D) or biological aortic root replacement (Bentall) procedure (ARr-B-bio) for aortic root pathology.MethodsWe compared outcomes for patients who underwent AVr-D (n = 261) or ARr-B-bio (n = 150) between 2000 and 2015 at our institution. The mean age of patients was 55 ± 13 years and 21.7% (n = 89) were female. ARr-B-bio patients were significantly older than AVr-D patients (58 ± 10 vs 53&thins...
Source: Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionLower apparent density of axonal packing, but not altered axonal orientation, is a key microstructural factor in the white matter abnormalities observed in youth born with CHD. These impairments in axonal packing may be an enduring consequence of early life brain injury and dysmaturation and may explain some of the long-term neuropsychological difficulties experienced by this at-risk group.
Source: NeuroImage - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
ConclusionWe have constructed a stereotaxic template set of macaque brain named HJT, which standardizes macaque neuroimaging data analysis, supports novel radiotracer development and facilitates translational neuro-disorders research.
Source: NeuroImage - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Authors: Bhullar SK, Shah AK, Dhalla NS Abstract Effective therapy of hypertension represents a key strategy for reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease and its associated mortality. The significance of voltage dependent L-type Ca²⁺ channels to Ca²⁺ influx, and of their regulatory mechanisms in the development of heart disease, is well established. A wide variety of L-type Ca²⁺ channel inhibitors and Ca²⁺ antagonists have been found to be beneficial not only in the treatment of hypertension, but also in myocardial infarction and heart failure. Over the past two decades, another cla...
Source: Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Tags: Rev Cardiovasc Med Source Type: research
Authors: Bashir MU, Bhagra A, Kapa S, McLeod CJ Abstract Atrial fibrillation is the most common symptomatic arrhythmia that is associated with stroke. Contemporary management of the disease is focused on anticoagulation to prevent stroke, coupled with catheter ablation to limit symptoms and prevent deleterious cardiac remodeling. Emerging data highlights the importance of lifestyle modification by managing sleep apnea, increasing physical activity, and weight loss. There is significant data that supports a link between the autonomic nervous system, arrhythmia development, and atrial fibrillation therapy. It is like...
Source: Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Tags: Rev Cardiovasc Med Source Type: research
Authors: Singhania G, Ejaz AA, McCullough PA, Kluger AY, Balamuthusamy S, Dass B, Singhania N, Agarwal A Abstract Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the benefits of guideline-directed medical therapy in the outpatient setting for treatment of chronic heart failure. However, the benefits of continuation (or discontinuation) of major chronic heart failure therapies when treating acute heart failure during hospitalization are less clear. Real and anticipated worsening renal function, hyperkalemia and hypotension are the three major reasons for discontinuation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibit...
Source: Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Tags: Rev Cardiovasc Med Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 12 October 2019Source: Journal of Sound and VibrationAuthor(s): M. Dal Borgo, M. Ghandchi Tehrani, S.J. ElliottAbstractThis paper presents a theoretical and experimental study of a stroke limited inertial actuator when used for active vibration control. The active control system under investigation consists of the inertial actuator attached to a flexible structure, a collocated vibration sensor and a velocity feedback controller (VFC). Controlling low frequency motions or large amplitude vibrations requires a very long stroke for the proof mass. However, a physical limitation of inertial ...
Source: Journal of Sound and Vibration - Category: Physics Source Type: research
These diets can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and the risk of diabetes as well as keeping you in shape. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: blogs
People genetically predisposed to sleep problems have greater risk of heart failure and stroke, say researchersPeople who struggle with sleep might be at greater risk of developing cardiovascular problems, research suggests.Scientists have found that people who are genetically predisposed to insomnia have a greater risk of heart failure, stroke and coronary artery disease.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sleep Health & wellbeing Life and style Science Heart disease Stroke UK news Society Source Type: news
ConclusionDespite some limitations in the design of this study, we found that most of the treated patients for primary RLS had no association with CVD and hypertension after controlling for key potential confounders. Comorbid CVD or hypertension was associated with cardiovascular risk factors, but not with RLS features except for older age at onset.
Source: PLoS One - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
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