Two-hour postload plasma glucose and pigment epithelium-derived factor levels are markers of coronary artery inflammation in type 2 diabetic patients

ConclusionsOur present study suggests that 120-minutes postload plasma glucose and PEDF values may be markers and potential therapeutic targets of coronary artery inflammation in type 2 diabetic patients.Clinical Trial RegistrationURL:http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00722631.Graphic AbstractNew markers for diabetes and CAD is on the horizon! Two-hour postload plasma glucose and pigment epithelium derived factor are markers of coronary artery inflammation in type 2 diabetic patients.
Source: Journal of Nuclear Cardiology - Category: Nuclear Medicine Source Type: research

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Geng-Hong Xia1†, Chao You1,2†, Xu-Xuan Gao1, Xiu-Li Zeng1, Jia-Jia Zhu1, Kai-Yu Xu3, Chu-Hong Tan1, Ruo-Ting Xu1, Qi-Heng Wu1, Hong-Wei Zhou3, Yan He4*‡ and Jia Yin1*‡ 1Department of Neurology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China 2Department of Neurology, The First People's Hospital of Zunyi, Zunyi, China 3State Key Laboratory of Organ Failure Research, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China 4Microbiome Medicine Center, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical Univ...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This study describes the relationship between classic cardiovascular risk factors and inflammatory markers with BMI in a group of obese and non-obese subjects.Materials and MethodsObese subjects (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2;n = 576; mean ± SD BMI 43.8 ± 7.58 kg/m2) scheduled for bariatric surgery were included. The reference population consisted of non-obese volunteers (BMI
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
AbstractBoth patients with non-ischaemic systolic heart failure and patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) often have reduced myocardial blood flow without significant coronary atherosclerosis. However, the mechanisms are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether perfusion is reduced additionally when the 2 are combined. In a cross-sectional study, we scanned patients with non-ischaemic systolic heart failure with and without T2DM using Rubidium-82 positron emission tomography/computed tomography at rest and adenosine-induced stress, thereby obtaining the myocardial flow reserve (myocardial flow ...
Source: The International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
You know the type. The macho guy who’s rough, tough, go-it-alone, leader-of-the-pack, help-not-wanted. Macho man may put off seeing a doctor for a checkup – because he thinks he’s invincible, doesn’t get sick, it’s a waste of time, only for the weak. Physicians at the University of Maryland Medical Center say some men only give in when they have symptoms, when major treatments are required, or when preventive steps are more demanding. Even so, it’s never too late to start on the road to health. June, Men’s Health Month, is a great time to focus on preventable health problems and en...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Health Tips Heart/Cardiac Care heart health mens health Source Type: blogs
In this study, researchers analysed data of millions of British patients between 1995 and 2015 to see if this claim held true. They tracked people who were obese at the start of the study, defined as people with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, who had no evidence of heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes at this point. They found these people who were obese but "metabolically healthy" were at higher risk of developing heart disease, strokes and heart failure than people of normal weight. No such thing as 'fat but fit', major study finds Several studies in the pas...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This report captures the state of the research community in a nutshell: progress in the sense that ever more scientists are willing to make the treatment of aging the explicit goal of their research, but, unfortunately, there is still a long way to go in improving the nature of that research. It is still near entirely made up of projects that cannot possibly produce a robust and large impact on human life span. The only course of action likely to extend life by decades in the near future is implementation of the SENS vision for rejuvenation therapies - to repair the molecular damage that causes aging. Everything else on th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS In patients with type 2 diabetes, FDG-PET/CT–imaged subclinical arterial inflammation is positively associated with determinants of arterial stiffness.
Source: Diabetes Care - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Cardiovascular and Metabolic Risk Source Type: research
By: Tanya Lewis Published: 03/02/2015 07:09 PM EST on LiveScience Good news for people who drink coffee every day: Consuming a moderate amount of coffee could lower the risk of clogged arteries that can lead to a heart attack, a new study finds. The study of healthy young adults in Korea found that, compared with people who didn't drink coffee, those who drank three to five cups of java per day had a lower risk of having calcium deposits in their coronary arteries, which is an indicator of heart disease. (The coronary arteries are the vessels that bring oxygenated blood to the heart muscle itself.) The study participant...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
I know someone, Jane, who goes to the doctor all the time. She has every ache, bump, rash or other symptom seen by a physician, usually a specialist. Jane often starts a statement with “my (insert a specialist type like orthopedic surgeon) says….” She is vigilant about regular check-ups and timely screening tests, which in her mind means she is practicing prudent prevention. The media (and discussions of healthcare reform), often limit their discussions of prevention to activities like check-ups and screening tests. A recent White House stakeholder ’s meeting included suggestions from physicians s...
Source: Health as Human Capital - Illustrated Research Summaries - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: blogs
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