The mystery of the Hawaii liver disease cluster in summer 2013: A pragmatic and clinical approach to solve the problem.

CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the Hawaii liver disease cluster is now best explained by various liver diseases rather than any DS, including OEP. PMID: 31320174 [PubMed]
Source: Annals of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Ann Hepatol Source Type: research

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Authors: As'habi A, Najafi I, Tabibi H, Hedayati M Abstract INTRODUCTION: Poor nutritional status is prevalent in peritonealdialysis (PD) patients and is related to morbidity and mortality.Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the dietaryintake and its related factors in PD patients in Tehran, Iran. METHODS: All eligible PD patients in Tehran peritoneal dialysiscenters were included in this cross-sectional study. Dietary intakeof PD patients was determined using a 3-day dietary recall. Also,a 4 mL blood sample was obtained from each patient to measureserum biochemical parameters. RESULTS: In...
Source: Iranian Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Iran J Kidney Dis Source Type: research
In this study we inoculated ground chicken meat with 25 individual isolates of clinical uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and newborn meningitis causing E. coli (NMEC), isolates from retail chicken meat (CM), as well as retail chicken-skin isolates identified in our laboratory (CS). We then determined their gamma radiation inactivation kinetics (D10-value). The mean D10-value for all isolates (n = 25) was 0.30 kGy. The mean D10-value for the UPEC, NMEC, CM, and CS isolates were 0.25, 0.29, 0.29, and 0.39 kGy, respectively. The mean D10-value for the clinical isolates was 0.27 kGy vs. 0.34 kGy for the non-clinical is...
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research
Abstract Leafy vegetables and fresh herbs are important parts of a healthy diet, however, they can be common vehicles of norovirus (NoV) infection and lead to serious health and economic concerns globally. NoV is highly infectious and persistent in the food and the environment, while being resistant to conventional food decontamination practices. Herbs and leafy greens are often consumed raw, and if contaminated with NoV, they may cause illness. Consequently, for outbreak prevention and surveillance purposes, sensitive and rapid methods are required to detect the presence of infectious NoV in naturally contaminate...
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research
In this study, protamine was covalently coated on the surface of the MNPs (20-30 nm) by a three-step chemical reaction. The successful linkage of protamine to the MNPs was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), zeta potential, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). When used for concentrating HAV from 40 mL of milk, 50 μL of PMNPs were added to the sample and mixed for 20 min by gentle rotation, followed by a magnet capture for 30 min. The captured PMNPs were washed with glycine buffer (0.05 M glycine, 0.14 M NaCl, 0.2% (v/v) Tween 20, pH 9.0) and HAV RNA was extracted using the ...
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research
Abstract The causative agents of zoonotic bovine tuberculosis (bTB), Mycobacterium bovis and M. caprae, are members of the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC). Wildlife such as red deer infected with bTB are often without pathological findings, thus meat thereof may be classified as safe for human consumption. The culturing of MTC is time consuming and inappropriate to be applied with fresh meat and food. Therefore, a rapid method "PMA qPCR" to differentiate living and dead cells of MTC was developed in this study. By treating with 50 μM PMA™ dye, dead M. bovis BCG (≤104 cells/ml meat suspensio...
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research
This study aimed to assess the distribution, adhesion, virulence and antibiotic resistance of L. monocytogenes in a pork production chain. Environment, carcass and food samples (n = 894) were obtained from different steps of a pork production chain over a 6-month period (10 samplings), including from farms and the slaughterhouse (reception, slaughtering, processing, storage and end products). L. monocytogenes was detected in samples from the reception (lairage floor, 1/10), slaughtering (drains, 2/20) and cutting room stages (conveyor belts in the final packing stage - 11/20, knife - 1/40, and cutting boards - 1/20). P...
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research
In this study, we used cluster analysis tools to compare S. Typhimurium isolates from a chicken-meat study with those reported to the National Enteric Pathogen Surveillance System (NEPSS) from the coincident human and non-human populations. There was limited phage type diversity within all populations and a lack of specificity of MLVA profiling within phage types. The chicken-meat study isolates were not significantly clustered with the human cases and at least 7 non-human sources, based on typing profiles (PT/MLVA combination), could be implicated as a source of human cases during the same period. In the absence of a stro...
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research
This study aimed to determine the influence of consecutive stresses inspired by slaughtering steps on the subsequent inactivation of Campylobacter jejuni during cold storage under different modified atmospheres. Using a full experimental design, three strains of C. jejuni of poultry origin were submitted to consecutive heat (46°, 50° or 54 °C for 4 min) and cold (-4° or 3 °C for 2 h) stresses by plunging cultures into baths at appropriate temperatures. Cultures were then stored at 6 °C during seven days under modified atmospheres (70% O2/30% CO2 or 50% CO2/50% N2). Inactivation of C. jejun...
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research
Abstract Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are important pathogens transmitted by food that may cause severe illness in human beings. Thus, systems for STEC detection in food should have increasingly higher sensitivity and specificity. Here we compared six commercial systems for non-O157 STEC detection in meat and vegetables and determined their sensitivity, specificity and repeatability. A total of 46 samples (meat n = 23; chard n = 23) were experimentally contaminated with strains O26:H11, O45:H-, O103:H2, O111:NM, O121:H19 and O145:NM isolated in Argentina. Strain detection was confirmed by ...
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research
Abstract Foodborne transmission of HEV is a growing public health concern in industrialised countries, where the disease is mainly autochthonous, caused by zoonotic HEV of either genotype 3 or 4. Foodstuffs containing pig's liver were suspected on several occasions to be the cause of autochthonous cases of HEV infection, while the transmission was associated with animal contact and the ingestion of raw or uncooked meat, especially liver. In assessing the risk related to the presence of HEV in food, detection methods were previously developed but HEV detection rates seem to vary with the type of samples and methods...
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research
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