Stem cell patches could help mend hearts after heart attack

Human trials will begin within two years after treatment shows promise in animalsScientists have developed heart patches that could benefit hundreds of thousands of people who have a heart attack.The British Heart Foundation (BHF) said the patches, which are grown in a lab and help repair damaged hearts, could one day provide an off-the-shelf treatment. They have shown promise in animals, and clinical trials in humans will begin in the next two years.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Heart attack Medical research Health Society Science Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: These data suggested that meflin is involved in cardiac tissue repair after injury and has an inhibitory role in MF differentiation of cardiac fibroblastic cells and the development of cardiac fibrosis. PMID: 31221024 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Circulation Research - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circ Res Source Type: research
Heart patches with a beat could help repair damage after a heart attack. The patches have shown promise in animals and will soon be tested in humans
Source: New Scientist - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research
AbstractDespite primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) and the availability of optimal medications, including dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), most patients still experience major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) due to frequent recurrence of thrombotic complications and myocardial infarction (MI). MI occurs secondary to a massive loss of endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and cardiomyocytes (CMs). The adult cardiovascular system gradually loses the ability to spontaneously and regularly regenerate ECs, VSMCs, and CMs. However, human cells can be induced by cytokines and growth ...
Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 17 May 2019Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Muhammad Qasim, Pala Arunkumar, Heather M. Powell, Mahmood KhanAbstractCardiovascular disease (CVD) is among the leading causes of mortality worldwide. The shortage of donor hearts to treat end-stage heart failure patients is a critical problem. An average of 3500 heart transplant surgeries are performed globally, half of these transplants are performed in the US alone. Stem cell therapy is growing rapidly as an alternative strategy to repair or replace the damaged heart tissue after a myocardial infarction (MI). Nevertheless, the relatively poor...
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
This is one of the more promising animal studies of heart regeneration that I recall seeing in recent years, particularly given that it is accomplished in pigs, which are a good match in size for human tissues. The heart is one of the least regenerative organs in the mammalian body, and damage, such as that resulting from a heart attack, results in scar tissue and loss of function rather than healing. Here, researchers used a microRNA in order to provoke native cells into regenerative activities that would not normally take place. One of the major goals of the regenerative medicine community over the past two decades has t...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
In this study, a significant (30%) increase in maximum lifespan of mice was found after nonablative transplantation of 100 million nucleated bone marrow (BM) cells from young donors, initiated at the age that is equivalent to 75 years for humans. Moreover, rejuvenation was accompanied by a high degree of BM chimerism for the nonablative approach. Six months after the transplantation, 28% of recipients' BM cells were of donor origin. The relatively high chimerism efficiency that we found is most likely due to the advanced age of our recipients having a depleted BM pool. In addition to the higher incorporation rates, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract Whether cell forces or extracellular matrix (ECM) can impact genome integrity is largely unclear. Here, acute perturbations (∼1 h) to actomyosin stress or ECM elasticity cause rapid and reversible changes in lamin-A, DNA damage, and cell cycle. The findings are especially relevant to organs such as the heart because DNA damage permanently arrests cardiomyocyte proliferation shortly after birth and thereby eliminates regeneration after injury including heart attack. Embryonic hearts, cardiac-differentiated iPS cells (induced pluripotent stem cells), and various nonmuscle cell types all show that a...
Source: Developmental Cell - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: Dev Cell Source Type: research
This study shows that mRNA levels of the aging related lamin A splice variant progerin, associated with premature aging in HGPS, were significantly upregulated in subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Moreover, our data revealed a significantly positive correlation of BMI with progerin mRNA. These data provide to our knowledge for the first-time evidence for a possible involvement of progerin in previously observed accelerated aging of overweight and obese individuals potentially limiting their longevity. Our results also showed that progerin mRNA was positively correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP). This might suggest an as...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we report the age-associated differences between fetal MSC (fMSC) populations and MSCs isolated from elderly donors with respect to their transcriptomes. We successfully reprogrammed fMSCs (55 days post conception) and adult MSC (aMSC; 60-74 years) to iPSCs and, subsequently, generated the corresponding iMSCs. In addition, iMSCs were also derived from ESCs. The iMSCs were similar although not identical to primary MSCs. We unraveled a putative rejuvenation and aging gene expression signature. We show that iMSCs irrespective of donor age and cell type re-acquired a similar secretome to that of th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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