AI Used to ID Risk of Heart Disease in Diabetes Study

Artificial intelligence is constantly being used in new and different applications in healthcare. A research team from the University of Gothenburg, is now using the power of AI in combination with conventional statistical methods in a study of risk factors in type 1 diabetes. The study’s objective was to identify the most important indicators of elevated risk for cardiovascular disease and death. "What's unique about this study is that we've included machine learning analyses - that is, algorithms for AI - to assess strength of association for cardiovascular risk factors," Aidin Rawshani, PhD, of Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, said in a release. Dr. Rawshani is the corresponding author of a new article in the journal Circulation. The study is based on register data concerning 32,611 people with type 1 diabetes for whom the mean duration of the disease had been 18 years. Follow-up time averaged just over 10 years. Alongside traditional statistical analysis, AI was used: Autonomous learning enabled the computer software to improve its ability to predict death and cardiovascular events. When the relative contribution of 17 risk factors was studied, five emerged as the strongest predictors: high long-term blood sugar (glycated hemoglobin) levels, kidney dysfunction, duration of type 1 diabetes, high systolic blood pressure (the first, higher figure of the two measured) and an excess of what is popularly known as "bad cholesterol&q...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

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Conclusion: Meta-analyses of all glucose-lowering RCTs involving patients with diabetes provide precise estimates of benefits for CHD and major cardiovascular events after consideration of the resulting ongoing BP difference. No benefit or harm on mortality, heart failure and stroke were noticed, while discontinuations related to adverse events because of treatment were increased following glucose-lowering. The extent of glucose-lowering is proportionally related to changes of CHD and stroke composite, and treatment-related discontinuations.
Source: Journal of Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Tags: REVIEWS AND META-ANALYSES Source Type: research
This study shows that mRNA levels of the aging related lamin A splice variant progerin, associated with premature aging in HGPS, were significantly upregulated in subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Moreover, our data revealed a significantly positive correlation of BMI with progerin mRNA. These data provide to our knowledge for the first-time evidence for a possible involvement of progerin in previously observed accelerated aging of overweight and obese individuals potentially limiting their longevity. Our results also showed that progerin mRNA was positively correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP). This might suggest an as...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Sarah K. Azzam1, Wael M. Osman2, Sungmun Lee1, Kinda Khalaf1, Ahsan H. Khandoker1, Wael Almahmeed3,4, Herbert F. Jelinek5 and Habiba S. Al Safar1,2* 1Biomedical Engineering Department, Khalifa University of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 2Khalifa University Center of Biotechnology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 3Institute of Cardiac Science, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 4Heart and Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 5Australian School of Advanced Medicine, Sydney and School of Community Health, Charles Sturt University, Ma...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
In conclusion, TSF improved lipid accumulation and hepatic steatosis by inducing the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway-mediated autophagy. Introduction Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a worldwide health concern due to the increased incidence of obesity and diabetes. In addition, NAFLD is closely associated with the risk factors of coronary heart disease, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia, which are considered to be the leading causes of death (Wiest et al., 2017). Although our understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD has significantly improved, there is still no effective medica...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
This study was hypothesis-driven; the genetic variants were selected for being previously and substantially genotyped. The big sample size and the rich panel of other biomarkers allowed the authors to conduct much more detailed analyses on this topic. The third article by Provenzi et al. proposed their perspectives on the role of telomeres in premature birth and discussed the potential implications for early adversity and care in the neonatal intensive care unit (Pavanello et al.). Indeed, the speculation of telomeres in aging begins in the premature aging syndrome. It is thus interesting to examine if telomeres also play...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Increasing Upstream Chromatin Long–Range Interactions May Favor Induction of Circular RNAs in LysoPC-Activated Human Aortic Endothelial Cells Angus Li1,2†, Yu Sun1†, Charles Drummer IV1, Yifan Lu1, Daohai Yu3, Yan Zhou4, Xinyuan Li1, Simone J. Pearson1, Candice Johnson1, Catherine Yu5, William Y. Yang1, Kevin Mastascusa1, Xiaohua Jiang1, Jianxin Sun6, Thomas Rogers7, Wenhui Hu1, Hong Wang1 and Xiaofeng Yang1,7* 1Center for Metabolic Disease Research, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusion: This study observed an inverse correlation between plasma LDL cholesterol and heart function in individuals with T2DM. Patients with higher levels of plasma LDL cholesterol had worse left ventricular function. Therefore, plasma LDL cholesterol may be a modifiable risk factor of heart failure in diabetes, but prospective studies are necessary to confirm this finding. Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a metabolic disease that affects a considerable number of patients worldwide (1). Among diabetic individuals, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality (2). C...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Aspirin is best known as an over-the-counter painkiller. But acetylsalicylic acid, as it’s called chemically, has many other health benefits, as well as side effects, in the body that have only become clear in recent years. Here’s what the latest science says about the health benefits and side effects of aspirin, as well as which conditions it may treat and those it doesn’t appear to improve. (If you are taking aspirin for any reason other than for periodic pain relief, it’s best to consult with your doctor to confirm whether the benefits outweigh the risks in your particular case.) How aspirin affe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime Source Type: news
This study shows that some genetic changes linked to cancer are present in surprisingly large numbers of normal cells. We still have a long way to go to fully understand the implications of these new findings, but as cancer researchers, we can't underestimate the importance of studying healthy tissue." Early Onset of Menopause Correlates with Shorter Life Expectancy https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/10/early-onset-of-menopause-correlates-with-shorter-life-expectancy/ Aging is a phenomenon affecting all organs and systems throughout the body, driven by rising levels of molecular damage. The v...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Taking a low-dose aspirin every day has long been known to cut the chances of another heart attack, stroke or other heart problem in people who already have had one, but the risks don’t outweigh the benefits for most other folks, major new research finds. Although it’s been used for more than a century, aspirin’s value in many situations is still unclear. The latest studies are some of the largest and longest to test this pennies-a-day blood thinner in people who don’t yet have heart disease or a blood vessel-related problem. One found that aspirin did not help prevent first strokes or heart attacks...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch aspirin Source Type: news
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