Evidence-Based Nonpharmacologic Strategies for Comprehensive Pain Care: The Consortium Pain Task Force White Paper

Publication date: May–June 2018Source: EXPLORE, Volume 14, Issue 3Author(s): Heather Tick, Arya Nielsen, Kenneth R. Pelletier, Robert Bonakdar, Samantha Simmons, Ronald Glick, Emily Ratner, Russell L. Lemmon, Peter Wayne, Veronica Zador, The Pain Task Force of the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and HealthABSTRACTMedical pain management is in crisis; from the pervasiveness of pain to inadequate pain treatment, from the escalation of prescription opioids to an epidemic in addiction, diversion and overdose deaths. The rising costs of pain care and managing adverse effects of that care have prompted action from state and federal agencies including the DOD, VHA, NIH, FDA and CDC.There is pressure for pain medicine to shift away from reliance on opioids, ineffective procedures and surgeries toward comprehensive pain management that includes evidence-based nonpharmacologic options. This White Paper details the historical context and magnitude of the current pain problem including individual, social and economic impacts as well as the challenges of pain management for patients and a healthcare workforce engaging prevalent strategies not entirely based in current evidence. Detailed here is the evidence-base for nonpharmacologic therapies effective in postsurgical pain with opioid sparing, acute non-surgical pain, cancer pain and chronic pain. Therapies reviewed include acupuncture therapy, massage therapy, osteopathic and chiropractic manipulation, meditative movem...
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research

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The crushing toll of the opioid crisis is daily news, including stories about ways to “fix” it. A wide array of initiatives has been brought forward in an attempt to curb this epidemic and the damage it causes. Prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) are one of them. The goal of PMPs is a good one — to identify patients who are being prescribed multiple medications by multiple clinicians. It is a means to introduce some stewardship for preventing overuse and misuse of prescription drugs. How prescription monitoring programs work Prescription monitoring programs are state-based electronic databases that pr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Drugs and Supplements Health Source Type: blogs
A  story in today’s Wall Street Journal discusses the latest report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development on ”prime age” (25-54) labor-force participation rates among its 35 member countries through the last quarter of 2017. While the US rate has improved, it remains below the average OECD rate, lagging behind such developed countries as Japan and the UK. What’s puzzling is why the authors of the report decided to weigh in on the opioid overdose issue.Noting that per capita opioid prescriptions in the US are “significantly higher” than in othe...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018 Source:EXPLORE Author(s): Heather Tick, Arya Nielsen, Kenneth R. Pelletier, Robert Bonakdar, Samantha Simmons, Ronald Glick, Emily Ratner, Russell L. Lemmon, Peter Wayne, Veronica Zador Consortium Pain Taskforce White Paper Summary Evidence-based Nonpharmacologic Strategies for Comprehensive Pain Care Supplementary information can be found in the online version at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.explore.2018.02.001. Medical pain management is in crisis; from the pervasiveness of pain to inadequate pain treatment, from the escalation of prescription opioids to an epidemic in addict...
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
(TRENTON, N.J.) — New data show that the number of prescriptions for opioid painkillers filled in the U.S. fell dramatically last year. They showed their biggest drop in 25 years. The decline comes amid increasing legal restrictions and public awareness of the dangers of addiction. A health data firm released a report Thursday showing a 9 percent average drop nationwide in the number of prescriptions for opioids filled by retail and mail-order pharmacies. All 50 states and the District of Columbia had declines of more than 5 percent. The U.S. is estimated to consume roughly 30 percent of all opioids used worldwide. ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018 Source:EXPLORE Author(s): Heather Tick, Arya Nielsen, Kenneth R. Pelletier, Robert Bonakdar, Samantha Simmons, Ronald Glick, Emily Ratner, Russell L. Lemmon, Peter Wayne, Veronica Zador Medical pain management is in crisis: from the pervasiveness of pain to inadequate pain treatment, from the escalation of prescription opioids to an epidemic in addiction, diversion and overdose deaths. The rising costs of pain care and managing adverse effects of that care has prompted action from state and federal agencies including the DOD, VHA, NIH, FDA and CDC. There is pressure for pain...
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
On December 11, 2017, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) issued statements of support for several policy proposals focused on resolving the opioid crisis. The proposals included: limits on prescribing, a ban on prescribing of Schedule II opioids in an office setting, ongoing prescriber training, and expanded access to addiction treatment options. Along with the policy proposals came an announcement that PhRMA and the Addiction Policy Forum have entered into a multi-year, multi-million dollar initiative to combat the opioid crisis and implement the Forum's plan to help solve the opioid crisis....
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
The widespread U.S. opioid &overdose crisis is an ever-increasing tragic concern for everyone: writhing victims, family members being fain to see their relatives suffer or die, doctors prescribing opioid pain-killers what they thought before as safe, and regulators imposed to handle a tough situation. Addiction. It’s painful to even read about the skyrocketing numbers of people suffering, thus we decided to map how digital health could help tackle the opioid crisis. Why is it so difficult to deal with the opioid crisis? Once you become addicted, it sticks with you for a long time, if not for life, just as a ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Bioethics Mobile Health Virtual Reality in Medicine AI artificial intelligence data data analytics drugs future gc3 Innovation opioid opioid crisis pharma technology wearables Source Type: blogs
In 2015, the opioid crisis was escalating to emergency-level proportions, claiming as many lives as car accidents. As the daughter of a longtime drug addict, the current burgeoning opioid epidemic managed to be both familiar and strange to me at the same time. My mother developed her addictions during the height of drug epidemics that occurred in New York City in the mid-1980s. The timeframe also marked the infancy of the AIDS crisis and the height of Reagan-era “Just Say No” programs. Back then, addiction was treated and viewed more as a crime than a disease, supposedly committed by scoundrels and misfits. The...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Behavioral Health Source Type: blogs
In a new study of the leading causes of death in the U.S., researchers say that opioids have contributed to a shortening of life expectancy. Scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report in JAMA that while life expectancy in the U.S. increased overall from 2000 to 2015, that improvement was blunted by deaths from opioid overdoses. (According to other recent research, deaths from opioid overdoses nearly doubled in the U.S. from 2009 to 2015.) The life expectancy for people born in 2015 increased by two years compared to people born in 2000, from 76 years to 78. Much of that gain was due to decreases ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized are opioids painkillers drug addiction Drugs leading causes of death opioid addiction opioid epidemic opioid overdose opioid overdoses opioid pain killers what are opioids what is the leading cause of death Source Type: news
Conclusion Some Medicaid recipients who gained coverage under the ACA may have become addicted to opioids, but we find little evidence that Medicaid expansion caused aggregate drug-related death rates to increase. Future research on the opioid epidemic should develop approaches that untangle the effects of Medicaid expansion from pre-existing economic trends and the spread of accessible illegal drugs. That said, by addressing the causes of addiction and promoting appropriate treatment, Medicaid could be an important tool for policy makers in the fight against opioid abuse. In January 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medi...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Following the ACA Medicaid and CHIP Public Health Quality Medicaid expansion opioid epidemic Source Type: blogs
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