Brain imaging show that patients with Alzheimer ’s disease can still remember and enjoy their favorite songs

___ Music Activates Regions of the Brain Spared by Alzheimer’s Disease (University of Utah): “Ever get chills listening to a particularly moving piece of music? You can thank the salience network of the brain for that emotional joint. Surprisingly, this region also remains an island of remembrance that is spared from the ravages of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers at the University of Utah Health are looking to this region of the brain to develop music-based treatments to help alleviate anxiety in patients with dementia. Their research will appear in the April online issue of The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease… For three weeks, the researchers helped participants select meaningful songs and trained the patient and caregiver on how to use a portable media player loaded with the self-selected collection of music. “When you put headphones on dementia patients and play familiar music, they come alive,” said Jace King, a graduate student in the Brain Network Lab and first author on the paper. “Music is like an anchor, grounding the patient back in reality.” The shaded areas were activated by familiar music. Using a functional MRI, the researchers scanned the patients to image the regions of the brain that lit up when they listened to 20-second clips of music versus silence. The researchers played eight clips of music from the patient’s music collection, eight clips of the same music played in reverse and ei...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness anxiety brain Brain-Imaging connectivity dementia fMRI music Source Type: blogs

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By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — Here’s another reason why getting a good night’s sleep should be on your must-do list: Sleeping fewer than six hours a night or waking frequently raises your risk of developing damaging plaque in arteries throughout your body, not just your heart. Previous research has shown poor sleep to be strongly associated with coronary heart disease, but “This is the first study to show that objectively measured sleep is independently associated with atherosclerosis throughout the body,” José Ordovás, director of nutrition and genomics at the Jean Mayer USDA H...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health CNN Heart Disease Sleep Tufts University Source Type: news
No matter whether it’s about the problems of aging, vision, hearing, disabilities or other permanent conditions, modern urban environments or residential places often disregard people with special needs. Luckily, technology and smart design might offer solutions on how to make cities more accessible, more inclusive and entirely suited for everyone in the future. Technology could support smart habitats for people’s real needs Grandmas, children, pregnant women, Filipinos, French or American people, tall, small, big, round-faced, blond, black-haired or bold – people differ in all kinds of ways, and we could...
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This study set out to examine amechanism that activates the attentional network in the salience region of the brain.The results offer a new way to approach anxiety, depression and agitation in patients with dementia.Learn More -Alzheimer's Care Anger, Frustration, and AgitationActivation of neighboring regions of the brain may also offer opportunities to delay the continued decline caused by the disease.The StudyFor three weeks, the researchers helped participants select meaningful songs and trained the patient and caregiver on how to use a portable media player loaded with the self-selected collection of music.“When...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer's Patients brain health memory music research science Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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Older adults experiencing worsening anxiety may have higher levels of a protein fragment implicated in Alzheimer ’s disease, according to astudy published today inAJP in Advance.Past studies have suggested depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms may be predictors of Alzheimer ’s progression during its “preclinical” phase—a period marked by the accumulation of brain deposits of fibrillar amyloid and pathological tau in a patient’s brain. In the current study, Nancy J. Donovan, M.D., of Brigham and Women ’s Hospital and colleagues examined the association between brain am...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer's disease amyloid beta anxiety depression mild cognitive impairment Nancy Donovan Source Type: research
Scientists at the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems have found evidence that long-term testing starting well before any signs of Alzheimer’s symptoms are evident could be a valuable tool in detecting which people will need intervention with therapeutic drugs that are now in clinical trials. This type of intervention could possibly halt or even reverse cognitive damage while the patient is still symptom-free. The long-term testing would be done in conjunction with brain scans. Read full article on HealthCentral about the value of long-term testing: Support a caregiver or jump star...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Growing up a musically-obsessed child in the 80's, Daryl Hall was one of my biggest inspirations. A masterful, inventive songwriter with an ocean of soul, he set me on the path to being an artist, to never waste a word, and to sing because I mean it. With six number ones and five additional top ten hits throughout the 70's and 80's Daryl Hall and John Oates are the number one duo in music history. Still at the top of his game at 69 years old, Daryl has won legions of new fans with his hit MTV Live show Live From Daryl's House. In February of 2015, at my very sickest from chronic Lyme and Bartonella, after it was missed b...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Have you ever wished, just once, your loved one suffering from Alzheimer's might remember your name, or a treasured memory you both share? More than 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia. Alzheimer's robs patients of their memories, leaving many in need of care from their loved ones, or nursing home staff. Giving care to an individual with Alzheimer's is exhausting, and often heart-breaking. The things they used to love about you start to annoy them. They don't seem to listen. They're no longer interested in hobbies that sparked a sense of joy and purpose. That once-brilliant mi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Discussion Disclosure of PET amyloid status did not significantly impact mood, subjective sense of memory impairment, or perceived risk of developing AD; nor was this associated with significant emotional impact, irrespective of actual amyloid burden status. Those subjects with increased amyloid burden were more likely than those without significant amyloidosis to make positive changes to their lifestyle (e.g., engaging in more exercise and changing their diet).
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
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