Portable Test Helps Identify Refugees at Risk of Outbreaks

WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it a lab in a box: Researchers created a device about the size of a toaster that can test a drop of blood to tell, in about half an hour, who's immune to certain infections and who's not. The goal is to find groups of people at risk of outbreaks, especially in impoverished and remote parts of the world, in time to save lives. Wednesday, Canadian researchers reported their novel tool worked pretty well at identifying people vulnerable to measles and rubella in a refugee camp in Kenya. "We're very excited about the potential for this technology," said epidemiologist Aimee Summers of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who helped the Canadian team field-test the device. And while the device first targeted measles and rubella, "we could imagine having a panel of tests for any type of infectious disease," said University of Toronto professor Aaron Wheeler, the study's senior author. Vaccine-preventable diseases remain a major problem in developing countries. Measles, for example, killed nearly 90,000 people worldwide in 2016, and 100,000 children are born every year with birth defects due to rubella. Checking when a population is at risk of an epidemic requires sending blood samples to laboratories to measure protective antibodies, immune system substances that signal someone was vaccinated or previously infected. But that's costly, time-consuming and simply not feasible in areas where the nearest lab is hundreds of...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

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This study was to verify the existence and extent of mumps outbreak in Copperbelt province; to describe the epidemiological characteristics of the outbreak; to identify risk factors associated with the illness; to confirm the etiology of the outbreak through appropriate laboratory testing; to inform disease control strategy and advocate for mumps, measles and rubella vaccine in Zambia, which has not yet been implemented.Study designA case report. Clinical records of cases suspected of mumps in the district were reviewed. Cases covered the first 36 weeks of 2015 (January to September, 2015). Charts were generated to capture...
Source: Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it a lab in a box: Researchers created a device about the size of a toaster that can test a drop of blood to tell, in about half an hour, who's immune to certain infections and who's not. The goal is to find groups of people at risk of outbreaks, especially in impoverished and remote parts of the world, in time to save lives. Wednesday, Canadian researchers reported their novel tool worked pretty well at identifying people vulnerable to measles and rubella in a refugee camp in Kenya. "We're very excited about the potential for this technology," said epidemiologist Aimee Summers of the...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news
Anti-vaccination headlines—like “HPV vaccine leaves another 17-year-old-girl paralyzed”—populate the Internet. That, and “Mom researches vaccines, discovers vaccination horrors, goes vaccine free,” are just a few examples of the fake science news stories shared this month on Facebook. If you are a parent on social media, you’ve likely seen many posts just like these. Maybe you’ve even clicked on one, curious. What’s the harm, right? As a family physician with four decades of experience fighting preventable disease around the globe and a professor of anthropology, risk a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news
Conclusions Access to EPI vaccination for children is a key example of preventative public health interventions that have been curtailed in Northern Syria since the start of the conflict. These findings demonstrate that collapse of the formal public health system has led to an increasingly large group of children who are susceptible to infectious diseases with serious consequences, with younger children most vulnerable. We call on all health actors and the international community to work towards re-establishment of EPI activities as a priority to ensure that children who have had no access to vaccination in the last five...
Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
Officials attribute some of the causes to unvaccinated children of Somali immigrants whose parents fell under the sway of anti-vaccination activists.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Epidemics Somali-Americans German Measles (Rubella) Minnesota Source Type: news
Abstract The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) gathered leaders in immunization programs, vaccine manufacturing, representatives of the Argentinean Health Authorities and Pan American Health Organization, among other global health stakeholders, for its 17th Annual General Meeting in Buenos Aires, to reflect on how vaccines are shaping global health. Polio eradication and elimination of measles and rubella from the Americas is a result of successful collaboration, made possible by timely supply of affordable vaccines. After decades of intense competition for high-value markets, collaborati...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Since the early 1990s, the Netherlands has experienced several large measles epidemics, in 1992-94, 1999-2000 and in 2013-14. These outbreaks mainly affected orthodox Protestants, a geographically clustered population with overall lower measles-mumps-rubella first dose (MMR-1) vaccination coverage (60%) than the rest of the country (>?95%). In the 2013-14 epidemic described here, which occurred between 27 May 2013 and 12 March 2014, 2,700 cases were reported. Several control measures were implemented including MMR vaccination for 6-14-month-olds and recommendations to reduce the risk in healthcare workers. The vast majo...
Source: Eurosurveillance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
e; SJ Abstract Since the early 1990s, the Netherlands has experienced several large measles epidemics, in 1992-94, 1999-2000 and in 2013-14. These outbreaks mainly affected orthodox Protestants, a geographically clustered population with overall lower measles-mumps-rubella first dose (MMR-1) vaccination coverage (60%) than the rest of the country (> 95%). In the 2013-14 epidemic described here, which occurred between 27 May 2013 and 12 March 2014, 2,700 cases were reported. Several control measures were implemented including MMR vaccination for 6-14-month-olds and recommendations to reduce the risk in he...
Source: Euro Surveill - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Euro Surveill Source Type: research
Abstract A large-scale national measles epidemic occurred among mainly in teenagers and young adults in 2007. MHLW announced ''Special infectious disease prevention guidelines for measles'' (issued on 28 December 2007; Revised issued on 30 March 2013), and Japan decided the elimination target year was fiscal year (FY) 2015. In 2008, it continued to be a large-scale nation epidemic exceeding 10,000 cases, and a large number of 0 to 1 year old infants, teenagers and young adults were suffering. Many cases were unvaccinated, single dose vaccination or unknown vaccination history. The number of measles cases has decli...
Source: Uirusu. Journal of Virology - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Uirusu Source Type: research
The chicken pox vaccine, formally known as the varicella vaccination, was added to the recommended childhood vaccination schedule in 1995. Prior to this vaccine’s creation, it was a common practice for families to expose children to others who had the chicken pox. The disease was considered a normal part of childhood and it was widely known that chicken pox in childhood posed little to no risk of serious harm. Risks associated with chicken pox are more common in adults and those with compromised immune systems. My Experience With The Chicken Pox Illness And Vaccination I clearly remember exposing my middle child to m...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Recent Articles chicken pox shingles truth about vaccines Varicella vaccine Source Type: blogs
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