EMT and Pediatric Doctor Aid Woman Impaled by Beach Umbrella at Jersey Shore
  SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. (WPVI) --Margaret Reynolds, 67, was at Seaside Heights Monday afternoon when part of the umbrella pierced her right ankle and was driven completely through due to the "force of the wind." Borough Police Chief Tommy Boyd says fire crews had to use a bolt cutter on the umbrella to free the woman and put her in an ambulance. Dr. Chris Strother - an emergency department pediatrician - was there to help. He said a spoke, not the shaft, of the umbrella injured the woman. "Big beach umbrella blew loose with the wind, flew down, and hit a woman with the end of the spoke, went r...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 19, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WPVI abc6 Tags: Trauma News News Videos Source Type: news

Wisconsin Bicyclist Ignores Barriers and Falls into Drawbridge Gap
MENASHA, Wis. (AP) — Police say a bicyclist who weaved past the gates blocking access to a bridge over a river in eastern Wisconsin escaped serious injury after falling into the gap that was created when the bridge started to rise. Wisconsin Department of Transportation surveillance video shot July Fourth shows the woman ignoring the barrier and red flashing lights at the bridge in Menasha, and apparently not noticing that it was already cranking into action. The woman and her bike then drop into the gap and she disappears. In the following minutes, onlookers rush to her aid and the bridge operator stalls the bridge ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 17, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Trauma News News Videos Source Type: news

Deadly Respiratory Distress Mimic
Medic 534, staffed by a paramedic and EMT, is dispatched to a nursing home for a 78-year-old female in respiratory distress. On arrival, the crew finds the patient in a chair accompanied by two nurses and the administrator on call. The patient is in obvious distress showing fatigue and an increased work of breathing. She is alert to voice, but diaphoretic, lethargic, and unable to speak due to rapid, shallow breathing. A nurse is administering a nebulizer containing 3 mL of albuterol sulfate/ipratropium. A second nurse states that the patient has been in increasing distress for the last 45 minutes. The nurse also says that...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 17, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brenton Faber, PhD, NRP Tags: Airway & Respiratory Patient Care Source Type: news

Pinellas (FL) Paramedic Stayed by Child's Side in Hospital After Near Drowning
Video: ABC Action News A photo showing a Pinellas County (FL) paramedic looking over a three-year-old girl after she was saved from a near-drowning incident has gone viral on social media. Pinellas Suncoast Fire & Rescue posted a photo of Firefighter-Paramedic Doug Higley waiting for the parents of the child to arrive at a local emergency room, according to a local report. The photo shows Higley sitting beside the child as she lay in a hospital bed. More HERE.   (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ABC Action News Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

REBOA: The Next Stop on the Road to Trauma Management?
The management of major trauma has a long history of failures found along a road of good intention. From Military Anti-Shock Trousers (MAST) to aggressive crystalloid administration, we’ve seen management strategies come and go over the years, after the reality of the practice didn’t measure up to the expectation of improved outcomes. Today, we have several novel concepts being implemented across the world to try to move the needle for trauma resuscitation. Tranexamic acid (TXA), blood product administration, and simple (finger) thoracostomy are a few of the advances that seem to be gaining interest in EMS. Alt...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark E.A. Escott, MD, MPH, FACEP, NRP Tags: Trauma Columns Source Type: news

9-1-1 Call Reveals Efforts to Resuscitate Olympic Skiier's Daughter
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A woman frantically asks an emergency dispatcher to coach her on how to perform CPR during a 911 call as she and others desperately struggle in vain to save the life of Olympic skier Bode Miller's daughter after the toddler fell into a swimming pool. "Yes, hurry. HURRY," the woman shouts at the beginning of the call released Tuesday. Asked by a male dispatcher what the emergency is, she tells him a 19-month-old girl fell into a backyard pool, is not breathing and has no pulse. "We don't know," the woman, who sounds near tears, replies when asked how long the girl was in the wate...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 13, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: John Rogers, Associated Press Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation News Source Type: news

WHO Reports 'Strong progress' in Calming Congo Ebola Outbreak
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — "Strong progress" has been made in calming Congo's deadly Ebola outbreak in a city of 1.2 million and in the rural outpost where the epidemic was declared one month ago, the World Health Organization said Friday, but now the focus turns to "some of the most remote territory on Earth." Health officials expressed cautious optimism as the pace of new cases has slowed. Congo's health ministry late Thursday announced a new confirmed Ebola case, bringing the total to 38, including 13 deaths. The new case is in the remote Iboko health zone in Congo's northwest. Health workers also h...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 9, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Carley Petesch, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Flu Season Was One of the Deadliest for U.S. Children
NEW YORK (AP) — Flu killed more U.S. children in the past year than during any other regular flu season in recent history. Health officials on Friday said they've received reports of 172 pediatric flu deaths since October. An average season sees about 110. There were more deaths in 2009-2010, when a rare flu pandemic occurred involving a new strain. More than 300 children died that season. The past flu season wasn't a pandemic, but it was an unusually long and intense one. It was driven by a kind of flu that tends to put more people in the hospital and cause more deaths, particularly young children and the elderly. M...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Superbug Infections Rising Among Injection Drug Users
NEW YORK (AP) — One type of superbug bacteria is increasingly spreading among people who inject drugs, according to a new government report. Users of heroin and other injection drugs were 16 times more likely than other people to develop severe illnesses from MRSA, said the report published Thursday. "Drug use has crept up and now accounts for a substantial proportion of these very serious infections," said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University, one of the study's authors. The U.S. is in the midst of its deadliest drug epidemic ever. While overdose deaths have been the main concern, some studies ha...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Chest Pain Patient Diagnosed with Rare Cardiac Anomaly
Broken Heart A rare diagnosis for chest pain patient By Brendan Mulcahy, DO, PA-C, NRP; Haley Delligatti, BS, NRP & Talo Capuzzi, NRP An ALS crew is dispatched for a 60-year-old male in cardiac arrest. On arrival, the crew finds the patient apneic, pulseless and cool to the touch with obvious signs of death. The patient’s wife is visibly distraught and unable to present a detailed history to the crew. The patient is confirmed asystolic on the monitor and the crew pronounces him dead on arrival. The crew leaves the scene and returns to service. Shortly after returning to service, the crew is dispatc...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brendan Mulcahy, DO, PA-C, NRP Tags: Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

Lift-Assists, Refusals and Releases
Four myths of no-loads & decisional capacity assessment A 9-1-1 call comes in for a 69-year-old female lift-assist. The patient’s daughter tells you that she found her mom on the floor that morning. According to your patient care report (PCR): “The patient appears in no distress and denies any complaints,” and you “assist the patient to her walker and her chair.” No past medical history, review of systems, or risk factors are recorded in the PCR, and no vital signs or physical exam are documented either. A release at scene is called into 9-1-1 dispatch, and the final call disposition in th...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neal Richmond, MD, FACEP Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Lift-Assists, Refusals and Releases: Four Myths of No-Loads and Decisional Capacity Assessment
Four myths of no-loads & decisional capacity assessment A 9-1-1 call comes in for a 69-year-old female lift-assist. The patient’s daughter tells you that she found her mom on the floor that morning. According to your patient care report (PCR): “The patient appears in no distress and denies any complaints,” and you “assist the patient to her walker and her chair.” No past medical history, review of systems, or risk factors are recorded in the PCR, and no vital signs or physical exam are documented either. A release at scene is called into 9-1-1 dispatch, and the final call disposition in th...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neal Richmond, MD, FACEP Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Treating the Ebola Outbreak in Western Africa
Ogweno and his team brought as many as 25 patients a day to the ETU. Photos courtesy Elvis Ogweno Working in EMS on an Ebola mission means you’re the first contact with the patient and the family. What you tell them matters a lot. When visiting a contaminated home, our team, which consists of a driver, two hygienists, one paramedic, and one psycho-social nurse, has to perform both donning (i.e., putting on) and doffing (i.e., taking off) our personal protective equipment (PPE) in the field. Before entering the house, we run through a PPE checklist: Scrubs, gum boots, gloves, Tychem suit, mask, hood, apron, goggle...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elvis Ogweno, MPH, CCP, NRP Tags: Major Incidents Patient Care Source Type: news

How Frequently do EMS Providers Receive Feedback on their Care?
This study comes from data obtained through the National Registry of EMT’s LEADS project. A survey was delivered with the registration packet for EMTs and paramedics. The objective was to determine how frequently EMS providers are given feedback on their care, the type of feedback received and how they received it. A total of 15,766 surveys were reviewed, with 69.4% of respondents reported receiving some form of feedback in the 30 days preceding the survey, 54.7% receiving specific feedback on the medical care they provided. Receiving feedback occurred more often for paramedics, EMS providers with fewer yea...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP, FAEMS Tags: Patient Care Columns Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

At the Center of the Ebola Outbreak in Congo, Worry and Indifference Coexist
  Democratic Republic of Congo (ABC News) - "Ebola, out! Ebola, out!" Those are the words children chant in unison after school in the Wangata district of Mbandaka, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Mbandaka is one of three areas affected by an Ebola outbreak in the central African nation and the focus of Ebola response efforts, since it's a hub in the region. Boats with passengers and goods travel to and from the city on a daily basis. Neighboring countries lie just across the busy Congo River. Three people in Mbandaka have died from Ebola disease in the past few weeks and more than 400 people are being ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 31, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Louise Dewast, ABC News Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

American Cancer Society Advises Colon Screenings Should Begin at 45, Not 50
NEW YORK (AP) — New guidelines released Wednesday recommend U.S. adults start colon cancer screening earlier, at age 45 instead of 50. The American Cancer Society's advice puts it out of sync with guidelines from an influential government advisory group, which kept the age at 50 in an update two years ago. Cancer society officials acknowledge the shift to 45 could cause confusion for doctors and patients but felt strongly that they needed to act now. The advocacy group was influenced by its study, published last year, that found rising rates of colon cancer and deaths in people younger than 50. Experts aren't sure wh...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 31, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Parent Heart Watch and Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation Join Forces to Urge the Public to Learn CPR and How to Use AEDs to Help Save Lives
Parent Heart Watch and the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation have joined forces to urge the public to learn CPR and how to use automated external defibrillators (AEDs) to help save lives threatened by sudden cardiac arrest. The co-sponsored Call-Push-Shock campaign is being launched to coincide with National CPR and AED Awareness WeekJune 1-7, a national observance designated by Congress in 2007. Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. It affects more than 356,000 people each year—including 7,000 youth under age 18—and unfortun...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation News Source Type: news

Health Officials 'Cautiously Optimistic' on Ebola Response
GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization said Tuesday it is "cautiously optimistic" about efforts to curb the spread of Ebola in an urban area in Congo, although the lethal virus is still reported in at least two remote areas. There have been 35 confirmed cases, including 12 deaths. The U.N. health agency and partners have vaccinated more than 400 people with an experimental Ebola vaccine, the first time it has been used in an emerging outbreak. WHO emergencies chief Peter Salama told reporters that the response has gone "quite smoothly" and that the agency's first priority had been to stop Ebo...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Ebola Vaccinations Begin in Congo's Northwest Town of Bikoro
KINSHASA, Congo (AP) — Officials began vaccinating health workers and others on Monday in Bikoro, where Congo's current Ebola outbreak was first declared at the beginning of May. Congo's Health Minister Oly Ilunga traveled to oversee the Ebola vaccinations of at least 10 people in Bikoro, where at least five of 12 Ebola deaths have happened. Bikoro Hospital director Dr. Serge Ngalebato said he and other health officials were vaccinated for protection when treating Ebola patients. "We who are on the front lines of caring for the sick. We are reassured," he told The Associated Press by telephone. Monday's vac...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 28, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Saleh Mwanamilongo, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

American Medical Response Offers Free Hands-Only CPR Training as Part of Nationwide Initiative
Syracuse, NY – If a person crumpled to the ground near you, would you know what to do? If that person was unconscious, what would you do next? During the week of May 20, in observation of National Emergency Medical Services Week, American Medical Response (AMR) operations across the country partnered with ACEP & IAFC to train thousands of people to save lives through compression-only CPR. Compression-only CPR is easy to learn and has the ability to keep a cardiac arrest victim alive until paramedics arrive. AMR Syracuse held free hands-only CPR sessions in the Destiny USA Canyon area to teach the compression-only...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 25, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: American Medical Response Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation Patient Care News Source Type: news

Cardiac Arrest Survivor Searches and Finds Paramedic Who Was “Comforting Soul” on Her Journey
First responders often have to look hard for the right address, the right house and even the right person to deliver what is often life-saving care. But it’s not often that a survivor of the care provided by a paramedic goes on a protracted search for a first responder – and finds him five years later. Yet that’s exactly what happened in the case of Battle Ground, Wash. paramedic David Crabtree and the young woman whose survival he contributed to on Feb. 12, 2013. When Heidi Stewart, now 23 and an American Heart Association Go Red For Women volunteer, was a senior at Evergreen High School in Vancouver, Wa...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 25, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: American Heart Association Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation Patient Care Source Type: news

IAFC Recommends Use of Mobile Technology to Activate Citizens and First Responders to Improve Sudden Cardiac Arrest Survival Rates
CHANTILLY, Va. —The International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) supports the use of mobile technology for citizen response in conjunction with community cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) programs. In a Position Statement adopted May 9, the IAFC Board of Directors cited the PulsePoint mobile phone application (app) as a unique solution to increase survival from sudden cardiac arrest by bridging the gap between a cardiac arrest event and arrival of medical assistance. According to the Position Statement, “Applications such as PulsePoint offer a unique way to involv...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 22, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: International Association of Fire Chiefs Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation Operations Source Type: news

Congo Announces 6 New Confirmed Cases of Ebola Virus
KINSHASA, Congo (AP) — Congo's health ministry announced six new confirmed Ebola cases and two new suspected cases Tuesday as vaccinations entered a second day in an effort to contain the deadly virus in a city of more than 1 million. Dozens of health workers in the northwestern provincial capital, Mbandaka, have received vaccinations amid expectations that some will be deployed to the rural epicenter of the epidemic. Front-line workers are especially at risk of contracting the virus, which spreads in contact with the bodily fluids of infected people, including the dead. "In the next five days 100 people must be...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 22, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Saleh Mwanamilongo and Carley Petesch, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Local Ohio EMS/Fire Agencies Learn New Ways to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survivability from Rialto Experience
CHELMSFORD, MASS.—ZOLL Medical Corporation, an Asahi Kasei Group Company that manufactures medical devices and related software solutions, announced today that several EMS and fire organizations from across Ohio participated in a ZOLL-sponsored Resuscitation Boot Camp in an effort to learn new techniques to increase survival from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Survival from out-of-hospital SCA in the U.S. stands at less than 10% and results in an estimated 350,000 deaths annually.  The boot camp training session, utilizing ZOLL’s resuscitation devices that each of these departments presently uses, was t...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 18, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ZOLL Medical Corporation Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation Industry News Source Type: news

American Medical Response Teams Up with International Association of Fire Chiefs and American College of Emergency Physicians to Train Bystanders How to Save Lives
GREENWOOD VILLAGE, Colo. – More than 350,000 Americans experience sudden cardiac arrest annually. When a bystander performs CPR until EMS arrives, the odds of the victim surviving can triple. To raise awareness and increase bystander CPR, American Medical Response (AMR), the nation’s largest provider of medical transportation, announced it is collaborating for the second year with the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). During National EMS Week, May 20-26, the organizations will train communities on how to assist those experiencing signif...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 18, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: American Medical Response Tags: Trauma Cardiac & Resuscitation News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

FDA Approves First Non-opioid Drug to Ease Withdrawal Symptoms
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Federal regulators have approved the first nonopioid treatment to ease withdrawal symptoms from quitting addictive opioids. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration expedited approval of Lucemyra (luc-eh-MEER'-eh) to help combat the U.S. opioid epidemic. The tablet was approved Wednesday to treat adults for up to two weeks for common withdrawal symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea, muscle pain and agitation. It is not an addiction treatment but can be part of a longer-term plan. People going through detox are usually given opioid medicine like methadone, which eases the cravings without an intense high....
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 16, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Linda A. Johnson, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Congo Approves use of Experimental Ebola Vaccine, WHO Says
KINSHASA, Congo (AP) — Congo has agreed to allow the World Health Organization to use an experimental Ebola vaccine to combat an outbreak announced last week, the WHO director-general said Monday. The aim is for health officials to start using the vaccine, once it's shipped, by the end of the week, or next week if there are difficulties, said WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. "We have agreement, registration, plus import permit — everything formally agreed already. And as you know that vaccine is safe and efficacious and has been already tested. So I think we can all be prepared," he sa...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 14, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Saleh Mwanamilongo and Jamey Keaten, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Congo Health Ministry Confirms 2 Ebola Cases in New Outbreak
KINSHASA, Congo (AP) — Congo's government on Tuesday declared a new outbreak of Ebola in the country's rural northwest, after two cases of the deadly virus were confirmed in Bikoro. Congo's Health Ministry said that of the five samples sent to the National Institute of Biological Research in Kinshasa, two came back positive for the Zaire strain of Ebola in the country's Equateur Province. The samples were gathered after the Equateur Province Health Ministry notified Kinshasa on May 3 of some 21 cases of a hemorrhagic fever in the Ikoko Impenge area, including 17 deaths, according to the World Health Organization and ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 9, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Saleh Mwanamilongo and Carley Petesch, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Duped Patients Crowdfund for Fraudulent Medical Care, Study Says
CHICAGO (AP) — They're the tech-age version of donor jars at the diner: crowdfunding websites that aim to link ailing people with strangers willing to help pay for medical treatment. But new research suggests duped patients sometimes crowdfund to pay for bogus stem cell treatments. A study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association focused on for-profit clinics that use direct-to-consumer advertising for costly unproven stem-cell treatments for conditions including chronic lung disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and arthritis. Treatments are often marketed as cures or with a pr...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Stroke Triage: EMS needs a diagnostic tool that goes beyond a simple history & physical exam
As a young EMT and paramedic, I had relatively little education about acute myocardial infarctions. In the age of the 3-lead ECG, education was largely focused on arrhythmia detection and how to differentiate heart blocks, tachycardia and bradycardia. Detection of heart attack was largely based upon history and physical exam findings. Three decades later, the thought of relying on a physical exam to diagnose a ST- elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is hard to imagine. Although we’ve made remarkable progress in the prehospital detection of STEMI, we’ve made significantly less progress in the diagnosis of ac...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark E.A. Escott, MD, MPH, FACEP, NRP Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Burn Care: Provider Expertise and Quick Decisions are a Patient ’s Best Chance for Survival
This article will provide an in-depth update of the prehospital care for burn patients. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Robert P. Girardeau, BS, NREMT-P, FP-C Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

The Role of CORE Interventions in Improving Health Outcomes and Reducing Acute Care Utilization
During home visits with patients, the CORE team aims to increase self-management, reduce acute care utilization and improve clinical outcomes. Photos courtesy Alicia Dinkeldein   The Community Outreach Resource Efficiency (CORE) program was created in 2012 as a division of Indianapolis (Ind.) Emergency Medical Services (IEMS) in partnership with Eskenazi Health. Since then, CORE has grown, and now has a team of two community paramedics, six community health workers, an EMT and a social worker. By leveraging this diverse and effective combination of expertise, the team can work with individuals who experience a combi...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Unnati Patel, MPH, CPH Tags: Patient Care Operations Mobile Integrated Healthcare Source Type: news

The Role of Core Interventions in Improving Health Outcomes and Reducing Acute Care Utilization
During home visits with patients, the CORE team aims to increase self-management, reduce acute care utilization and improve clinical outcomes. Photos courtesy Alicia Dinkeldein   The Community Outreach Resource Efficiency (CORE) program was created in 2012 as a division of Indianapolis (Ind.) Emergency Medical Services (IEMS) in partnership with Eskenazi Health. Since then, CORE has grown, and now has a team of two community paramedics, six community health workers, an EMT and a social worker. By leveraging this diverse and effective combination of expertise, the team can work with individuals who experience a combi...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Unnati Patel, MPH, CPH Tags: Patient Care Operations Mobile Integrated Healthcare Source Type: news