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Studies Suggest Automated Safety Systems are Preventing Car Crashes
WASHINGTON (AP) — Safety systems to prevent cars from drifting into another lane or that warn drivers of vehicles in their blind spots are beginning to live up to their potential to significantly reduce crashes, according to two studies released Wednesday. At the same time, research by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety raises concern that drivers may be less vigilant when relying on automated safety systems or become distracted by dashboard displays that monitor how the systems are performing. The two institute studies found that lane-keeping systems, some of which even nudge the vehicle back into its lane f...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 23, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joan Lowy, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Wisconsin Man Drives to ED After Accidentally Puncturing His Heart With a Nail
MILWAUKEE (AP) — A Wisconsin man who doctors say came perilously close to death after accidentally shooting a nail into his heart while working on his house calmly drove himself to the hospital and even parked his pickup truck in the lot before walking into the emergency room. Doug Bergeson is ready to get back to work this week after surviving a June 25 ordeal that others might not have taken in such stride. Bergeson told The Associated Press he was working on framing in a fireplace at his house near Peshtigo in northeast Wisconsin when his nail gun accidentally fired, sending a nail ricocheting off some wood and in...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 16, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Gretchen Ehlke, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Data Shows Fewer Deaths from Lightning Strikes
WASHINGTON (AP) — Lightning — once one of nature's biggest killers —is claiming far fewer lives in the United States, mostly because we've learned to get out of the way. In the 1940s, when there were fewer people, lightning killed more than 300 people annually. So far this year, 13 people have died after being struck, on pace for a record low of 17 deaths. Taking the growing population into account, the lightning death rate has shrunk more than forty-fold since record-keeping began in 1940. People seem to be capturing the phenomenon more on camera than before, making it seem like something new and sizzlin...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seth Borenstein, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

EMS Physicians Endorse Toxicology Groups' Opioid Safety Precautions Guidance
WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) announces its endorsement of a new American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) and American Academy of Clinical Toxicology (AACT) document detailing pragmatic and actionable safety precautions for first responders in opioid overdose situations. NAEMSP is an organization of physicians and other professionals partnering to provide leadership and foster excellence in the subspecialty of EMS medicine. In pursuing its mission to improve out-of-hospital emergency medical care, NAEMSP’s Executive Board and Standards and Clinical Practice Committe...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

Curaplex Launches Stop the Bleed Kits as Licensees of the Department of Homeland Security ’s Stop the Bleed Initiative
Dublin, Ohio–Curaplex, the brand carried exclusively by Sarnova’s family of companies, is adding Stop the Bleed kits to their product portfolio. Curaplex Stop the Bleed kits were designed to provide their end user with immediate access to products intended to stop traumatic hemorrhaging. These kits contain basic products for emergency responders or civilians to address a traumatic bleeding situation. These kits are all vacuum‐packed and tamper‐proof for easy storage and opening. These kits are available through both Bound Tree Medical (www.boundtree.com) and Emergency Medical Products Inc. (www.buyemp.com)...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sarnova Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

Paramedics Save Nurse in Cardiac Arrest in Their Home
LACKAWANNA, N.Y. (WGRZ) -- When Wayne Howard talks about the call he received on July 29th, at first he said he didn’t feel much urgency. Michael and Maureen McCarthy said the same thing.  Michael even admits he was out golfing with his grandson when he got a similar call. 42-year-old Lynn Howard — Wayne’s wife and the daughter of Michael and Maureen — had collapsed while at work.  Could it have been exhaustion? Maybe she hadn’t eaten properly that day? After playing through each of the less severe options, Lynn’s family were called to the hospital in a much more serious tone. ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joshua Robinson, WGRT Tags: News Videos Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

First Responders Rescue Man Found With Both Hands Nailed to a Tree
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – Police found him nailed to a tree in the middle of the Bosque, and now KRQE News 13 obtained the video of those moments, including how first responders worked to rescue him. Back in May, a city worker discovered a man, both hands nailed to a tree and screaming for help. “He kept yelling, ‘Help. Help,’ and so I came and I saw him and I kind of freaked out because I didn’t know if there was any other guys around,” the city worker told police. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 9, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marissa Lucero, KRQE Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Parasitic Cyclospora Infections up 134% This Summer
A recent article from CNN highlighted the increase in the number of cases of cyclospora infections: There were 206 cases of cyclospora infections reported by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from the first of May to the beginning of August, a 134% increase from the 88 cases reported over the same time period in 2016. Cyclospora infections or cyclosporiasis are caused by ingestion of the parasite Cyclospora cayetanensis in food or water. Cyclospora infect the small intestine and most commonly cause watery diarrhea; other symptoms include abdominal cramping, nausea and weight loss. Those with...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 9, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Katherine West, BSN, MSEd, CIC Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Enhanced Version of New SIPQuik Vacuum Cervical Splint Getting Rave Reviews
The new, enhanced version of the SIPQuik (Stabilize in Place) one-size-fits-all vacuum cervical splint, one of the 30 Hot Products selected at the 2017 EMS Today Conference in Salt Lake City, is getting rave reviews by early adopters, and its enhanced version is now available. I had the opportunity recently to meet with Steve Islava, the creator of the SIP cervical splint to see the latest, enhanced version and try it out. The splint is unique from other collars and splints because one size truly fits all patients. The splint is designed to be placed on the patient in the position they are in to avoid excessive movement of...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT P Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Enhanced Version of New SIPQuick Vacuum Collar Getting Rave Reviews
The new, enhanced version of the SIPQuick (Stabilize in Place) one-size-fits-all vacuum collar, one of the 30 Hot Products selected at the 2017 EMS Today Conference in Salt Lake City, is getting rave reviews by early adopters, and its enhanced version is now available. I had the opportunity recently to meet with Steve Islava, the creator of the SIP collar to see the latest, enhanced version and try it out. The collar is unique from other collars because one size truly fits all patients. The collar is designed to be placed on the patient in the position they are in to avoid excessive movement of their neck. The enhancements...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT P Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Experts Stumped by Australian Teen's Foot Injury
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — A teenager who went for a swim at a Melbourne beach and emerged with his feet covered in blood has stumped marine experts. Sam Kanizay's legs felt sore after playing a game of football on Saturday, so he decided to soak them at the beach. About 30 minutes later, the 16-year-old walked out of the water with his feet and ankles covered in what looked like hundreds of little pin holes that were bleeding profusely. Upon returning home, his parents promptly took him to the hospital. Kanizay's father, Jarrod, said hospital staff had no idea what kind of creature could have caused the injuries. S...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Derivation of a Termination of Resuscitation Clinical Decision Rule in the UK
In the United Kingdom, sudden cardiac arrest accounts for close to 100,000 deaths annually.1 Despite improvements in resuscitation practices,2 outcomes from OHCA remain poor, regardless of interventions utilized.3 In a one-year period during 2014-2015, approximately 30,406 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) in England were transported to hospitals by ambulance, with a survival rate of 8.6%.4 Transporting patients with nearly certain poor outcomes represents an ineffective use of ambulance resources.5,6 Termination of resuscitation (TOR) clinical decision rules (CDRs) for OHCA exist and have been validated.5,7,8 These ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matthew House, DHC, MSc, LL.B (hons) Tags: Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

How to Read and Interpret End-Tidal Capnography Waveforms
Capnography is a great way to confirm airway device placement and monitor ventilation, but it can do so much more. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a product of metabolism transported via perfusion and expelled through ventilation. End-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) waveform monitoring allows you to measure all three simultaneously, making it the most important vital sign you use.1 To evaluate the metabolism, ventilation and perfusion of a patient through EtCO2 waveform monitoring you need to read the PQRST: proper, quantity, rate, shape and trend. Proper means that you should know the normal readings for quantity, rate, shape and tr...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rommie L. Duckworth, LP Tags: Airway & Respiratory Patient Care Source Type: news

Listening to Our Patients
When was the last time any of us used a stethoscope and felt it made a difference either to clinch a diagnosis or to change the management of a sick patient? Diagnostic Tool or Neckwear? How many of us have had a patient with a history of hypertension, diabetes or myocardial infarction (MI), who presented with complaints of chest pain and shortness of breath? On exam, he might have been anxious and diaphoretic, with a heart rate of 130, respirations of 24, blood pressure of 190/110, bilateral pedal edema, oxygen saturation (SpO2) of 89% and 12-lead ECGs showing ST-elevation. Then you put your scope on hi...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neal Richmond, MD Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

The Impact of Telehealth-Enabled EMS on Ambulance Transports
The Research Langabeer R, Gonzalez M, Alqusairi D, et al. Telehealth-enabled emergency medical services program reduces ambulance transport to urban emergency departments. West J Emerg Med. 2016;17(6):713-720. The Science Researchers in Houston wanted to measure the ability of using a combination of telemedicine, social service pathways and alternative means of patient transportation for patients who didn't require an ED visit by ambulance. It was conducted by the Houston Fire Department and termed the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN) program. Eligible patients included those with primary care-re...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Ketamine May Aid in Prehospital Management of Severe Asthma
An ALS unit that has a 60-year-old female on board in severe respiratory distress. On arrival, you find your patient altered in the back of the ambulance. She's hypoxic, with oxygen saturation (SpO2) in the upper 60s, and has audible wheezing. She will not keep the non-rebreather mask on. Initially she was found unresponsive by the ALS crew, who first attempted intubation, but had difficulty doing so as they don't carry paralytics. An 18-gauge IV had been established in the left antecubital area, and she received 125 mg of solumedrol IV. The first arriving ALS crew has treated her before and indicates she has a history of ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jennifer Keefer, BSN, CFRN, NRP Tags: Airway & Respiratory Columns Source Type: news

Mother and Baby Found in Hot Car
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (WHNT) -- Sunday morning HEMSI crews responded to a 911 call that a baby was in a car and the mother was passed out in the parking lot of the Oakwood Avenue Kroger. "We had no idea how long the child and the lady had been in the vehicle. Fortunately a person that was walking by the vehicle was very alert to their surroundings, and saw it and tried to stimulate it and then activated the 911 system," said Don Webster, HEMSI Chief Operations Officer. Webster said the baby is between four and five months old. Paramedics assessed both mother and child on the scene. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Caitlan Dallas, WHNT Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

U.S. Hospitals Set Record for Fast Heart Attack Care
There's never been a better time to be treated for a heart attack. U.S. hospitals have set a record for how quickly they open blocked arteries, averaging under one hour for the first time since these results have been tracked. More than 93 percent of patients now have their arteries opened within the recommended 90 minutes of arrival. "Things have definitely improved" from a decade ago, when less than half of heart attack patients were treated that fast, said Dr. Fred Masoudi, a University of Colorado cardiologist who led a recent report examining response times. It's based on records from about 85 percent of U.S...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 31, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marilynn Marchione, Chief Medical Writer, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation News Source Type: news

CPR App Helps Save a Man's Life
HOWARD COUNTY, Md. (ABC7) — A CPR app called “PulsePoint” helped save the life of a man having a heart attack inside of a conference room in Howard County, Maryland. While Sean McGuire was slouched over in a chair in his office, co-workers called 911. The PulsePoint app activates once a cardiac arrest and/or a 911 call is registered in the system in Howard County. The app notifies everyone in the area of the location where an incident happens or if someone needs CPR. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 28, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sam Sweeney, ABC7 Tags: News Videos Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

Parents, Players, Coaches Educated on Concussions
Jefferson County, Ohio (WTOV9) - One day after a new study was released on concussions, local experts educate parents, coaches and players on the issues. Summer is coming to a close and that means football season is quickly approaching and as exciting as that time of year is, it is also the time of year parents start to worry a little more about concussions. “Concussions are a problem and can potentially be a problem, but if found out appropriately and treated appropriately it should not be a long term issue," says Director of Trinity Sports Medicine Michael Scarpone. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 27, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kate Siefert, WTOV9 Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Librarians Being Trained to Respond to Overdoses
King County, Wash. (KING) - Unlikely recruits are now at the forefront of the heroin epidemic: librarians. Some libraries around the country are training their staff to use Naloxone, better known as Narcan, to prevent overdose deaths. “It’s been for a long time something that we’ve seen in our more urban libraries, and now we’re seeing it in our suburban libraries as well. Suburban communities are facing this issue in ways they haven’t before,” said King County librarian Angelina Benedetti. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 27, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: LiLi Tan, KING Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

New Study Examines Brain Injury in Football Players
CHICAGO (AP) — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school. It's the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss. The report doesn't confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players' repeated concussions a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 26, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

New Study Shows Prevalence of Brain Disease in Former Football Players
CHICAGO (AP) — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school. It's the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss. The report doesn't confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players' repeated concussions a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 25, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Trauma Patient Care News Source Type: news

Paramedic, EMT, Probationary EMT Save Premature Baby
DETROIT (WXYZ) - A medic-in-training is being hailed for helping to save the life of a mother and newborn. Steven Andary, a probationary technician with the Detroit Fire Department was with paramedic James LaCroix and EMT James Basirico on June 24th when they were called to the 1900 block of E. Larned. Inside the home the found a 28-year-old mother in active labor, delivering her baby 15 weeks early. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 21, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shelley Childers, WXYZ Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Unlikely Hero Helps a Family After Crash
  Amarillo, Tx (KAMR) - He's only been out of prison for three months, and was returning home before his strict curfew when he witnessed a car crash.  When he heard the cries of an infant, he ran toward the accident.  Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 18, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: KAMR Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

FDA Grants De Novo Clearance for Z-Medica ’s QuikClot Control+ Only Non-Absorbable Hemostatic Dressing for Severe Bleeding in Internal Organ Space
Wallingford, Conn. - Z-Medica, LLC, a leading developer and marketer of hemostatic devices, announces that QuikClot Control+ has been cleared for use by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under the de novo classification process and is designated as a Class II medical device. QuikClot Control+ is the first and only non-absorbable hemostatic dressing cleared for internal organ space use in severely bleeding patients. QuikClot Control+ is indicated for temporary control of internal organ space bleeding for patients displaying class III or class IV bleeding. It may also be used for control of severely bleeding wound...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dave Schemelia Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

EMT Firefighter Saves Newborn Baby
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (mypanhandle.com) -  When Panama City Firefighter and EMT, Marty McFaul, loaded up on the engine at 2 a.m., he and his crew expected nothing more than a routine medical call. It wasn't until they got on scene did they realize time was working against them. "A woman just, just had a baby unexpectedly," said McFaul. The new mom is in shock and the baby is too quiet. "The baby is not breathing, it's not moving," said McFaul. "The baby is still." Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kelsey Peck, MyPanhandle.com Tags: Airway & Respiratory News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Hospital Protocols Under Review After NYPD Officer Fatally Shot
NEW YORK (AP) — Four days before Alexander Bonds ambushed and killed a New York City police officer, he was in a hospital emergency room getting a psychiatric evaluation. The hospital released him the same day. Now the hospital's actions are under a state review ordered by the governor. St. Barnabas Hospital says it handled Bonds appropriately and welcomes the inquiry. The decision was one psychiatrists across the country make regularly: whether patients pose enough danger to themselves or others to require hospitalization. Practitioners say that it's often a difficult call to make and that even an experienced evalua...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jennifer Peltz, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

EMT Treats Girl for Allergic Reaction to Lotion, Develops Same Reaction In Spite of Following Protocol
Jerusalem - An allergic reaction is not something that is contagious, however, an unlikely situation occurred on Wednesday, when EMS teams were called to help treat a young woman who developed a severe allergic reaction to a tanning cream that she had been using. Shai Levi (17) who hails from Kibbutz Matzuva in the western Galilee, went to a tanning spa in Nahariya and applied some tanning lotion that was intended to speed up the tanning process.   “This is not the first time that I have used this cream, but it is the first time I had an allergic reaction to it,” Levi explained to Yisrael Hayom reporters. ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: United Hatzalah Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

A Profile of James Dunford, MD, Recipient of the 2017 James O. Page/JEMS Leadership Award
It would be easy to trip over the seemingly endless supply of plaques and awards possessed by James Dunford, MD, if they weren't so meticulously tucked away out of sight. The fact that the awards are hidden behind his well-organized desk isn't because their owner trivializes them. It's merely a testament to the disarming humility of this emergency physician. Dunford isn't in it for the praise. He's on a tireless quest to fix a broken system. But talent like his can't hide behind a desk, which is why it's no surprise that he's the 2017 James O. Page/JEMS Leadership Award recipient. Dunford passionately believes in helping s...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 6, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lauren Crosby, NREMT Tags: Patient Care Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

EMS Transport of Service Dogs & Support Animals
Engine 30 and Medic 6 respond to their local shopping mall and find, Nancy, a 38-year old female complaining of tightness in her chest. Nancy is sitting on a sidewalk bus bench with her dog. Bystanders tell you she seemed to get upset when she missed her bus and within minutes began complaining she wasn't feeling well. Nancy is visibly upset, but able to answer your questions appropriately. Her heart rate is 96, strong, regular and corresponds to sinus rhythm on your monitor, with a blood pressure of 156/88 and a respiratory rate of 28, non-labored. The rest of her vital signs and physical assessment are within...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 6, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Criss Brainard, EMT-P Tags: Patient Care Operations Source Type: news

Do Termination of Resuscitation Guidelines Predict Cardiac Arrest Survival?
The Research Drennan I, Case E, Verbeek P, et al. A comparison of the Universal TOR Guideline to the absence of prehospital ROSC and duration of resuscitation in predicting futility from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Resuscitation. 2017;111:96-102. The Science The authors wanted to determine how well the Universal Termination of Resuscitation (TOR) Guideline could predict survival from cardiac arrest. The TOR recommends that resuscitation be terminated in the field when all three of the following are true: 1) EMS didn't witness the arrest; 2) return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) didn't occur despite resuscitation att...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 6, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Point-of-Care Ultrasound Helps Streamline Management of Cardiac Arrest
Point-of-care ultrasound plays an important role in the management of cardiac arrest, as Dr Matthew Reed, an Emergency Medicine consultant at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, explained: “We know that the prognosis for a patient with a beating heart is far better than for someone in cardiac standstill. Using ultrasound, we can see whether or not a patient remains in cardiac standstill following a period of intensive resuscitation, and may also be able to identify a previously undetected pathology – such as cardiac tamponade or ventricular fibrillation – that was not visible on the ECG. Ultrasound can also...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 5, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: FUJIFILM SonoSite Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

Sodium Bicarbonate as a Tool for Managing Head Trauma
Your aeromedical EMS crew is dispatched to Mexico for a head injury patient who's an American citizen being repatriated back home. The patient is a 47-year-old male who was found unresponsive on the side of the road in Mexico the previous day and was diagnosed with a subarachnoid hemorrhage. It's unclear what happened, but the patient may have fallen or been hit by a car. There are no signs of external trauma noted. He was brought to the local clinic where surgery was performed for a subarachnoid hemorrhage. On arrival, the crew finds an intubated male with a Glasgow coma scale (GCS) of 3 with pupils of 4 mm and n...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 5, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jazmine Valencia, NNP-BC, RN, CCRN Tags: Trauma Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Teen Meets Paramedic Who Saved Her Life
WHEELERSBURG, Ohio (WSAZ) -- A year after suffering a health episode that nearly took her life, a teenage girl had her wish granted. She didn't want to meet anyone famous. She wanted to meet the person who helped save her life. Kayla Garland is recovering after suffering a cardiac arrest at her home last June. "It was a big shock," Kayla's mother, Tracy Grube, said. "And they still don't know what the cause of the cardiac arrest was." Kayla was 14-years-old at the time and she lost nearly all her eyesight. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 3, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WLIX Tags: News Videos Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

EMTs Help Elderly Woman Struggling in Texas Heat
WACO, Texas (KWTX) An East Texas Medical Center ambulance crew stopped to help Wednesday after spotting a 98-year-old woman mowing her lawn in the June heat. One ETMC paramedic and two EMTs were between calls Wednesday when they spotted Margaret Durham in the 3600 block of Windsor Avenue. She appeared to be overheated, an ETMC spokesman said, so the ambulance turned around and headed back to the house, and the crew finished the mowing job. "She's elderly and looked exhausted," said paramedic Kent Haney. "She was on a dangerous slope of the yard, possibly could fall and lose control of the lawn mower and...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: KWTX Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Taylor County, Texas EMTs Treat Starving Dog
ABILENE, Texas (KRBC) — More often than not, you hear the heroic stories of our first responders saving someone’s life from a dangerous accident or situation, but, what you don’t hear so often is a first responder saving an animal’s life. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 28, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amber Treybig, KRBC Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Father of LSU Star Pitcher Revives Man With No Pulse at College World Series Game
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The father of LSU pitcher Jared Poche' helped revive an 87-year-old man who was slumped on the TD Ameritrade Park concourse with no pulse during Game 1 of the College World Series finals. Dr. Jerry Poche' of Lutcher, Louisiana, was in Section 117 when he was summoned by another LSU fan in the sixth inning of the Tigers' game against Florida on Monday night. "I see an older gentleman being held up by his family, and they said he's weak," Poche' said Tuesday. "He wasn't weak. He didn't have a pulse, and he had (laboring) respirations. He was dying." Poche' said he began doing ches...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 27, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Eric Olson, Associated Press Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation News Source Type: news

Emergency Cardiac Care Leaders Take First Steps Toward Creation of a National Cardiac Arrest Collaborative
The inaugural meeting of the National Cardiac Arrest Collaborative took place on May 11th at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The meeting was a follow up to a workshop conducted in Washington, D.C. in July 2016, which explored recommendations of a Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on improving survival from cardiac arrest. Among many other focus areas, the IOM report called for fostering a culture of action by improving public awareness and training and creating a national cardiac arrest collaborative. The IOM report points out that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. Th...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 27, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mary Newman, MS Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

5 Commended for Saving Lives
SEBRING — Five Highlands County women were honored Tuesday for saving two lives in separate incidents. On May 15, while attending class at the South Florida State College, Wendy Roberts, Anne Marie Cornine, and Jenifer Bidlack “went above and beyond the call of duty,” said County Administrator June Fisher. “When they were made aware of a medical emergency in the cafeteria, they actually outran Steve Ashworth’s golf cart from quite a distance away to get to the cafeteria. Upon arriving, they immediately took over,” Fisher told the Highlands County Commissioners at their Tuesday meet...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 26, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Gary Pinnell, Highlands County Sun Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

Inmates Save Fallen Deputy, Sentences Reduced
POLK COUNTY, Ga. (WXIA) -- Polk County’s sheriff said he plans on knocking some time off of the sentences of the inmates who stepped in to help when a deputy went down. The deputy, who asked not to be identified, said that when he woke up on the morning of June 12, he didn’t feel well. It was 76 degrees outside, and the humidity was at 100 percent. He was on a work detail at a local cemetery with six inmates -- men he knew well from working together seven hours a day, five days a week. “We spend a lot of time together,” the deputy said.  Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 23, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Phillip Kish and Deborah Tuff, WXIA Tags: News Videos Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

FDA Approves New, Cheaper Rival to EpiPen Allergy Shot
There are now several cheaper alternatives to the exorbitantly priced EpiPens that should please EMS agencies. ABC News has shared this story:   U.S. regulators have approved new competition for EpiPen, the emergency allergy medicine that made Mylan a poster child for pharmaceutical company greed. The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved Adamis Pharmaceuticals Corp.'s product, which should go on sale later this year. Read more... This month’s cover story on the King County Washington EMS system (click here for a link to the article) focuses on their system’s move away from Mylan’s exorb...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 21, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT P Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Zamboni Driver Saves Hockey Player in Cardiac Arrest
  Canton, Mass. (CBS Boston) – A quick-thinking Zamboni driver helped save a Dorchester man who suffered a heart attack while playing hockey. “I came out of the compressor room and I noticed a man down on the ice,” said Eric Baker who drives the Zamboni at the Canton Sportsplex. Baker was working on Saturday as a group of forty-somethings, all friends who grew up together in Dorchester, had their yearly reunion and hockey game when 46-year-old Chris Gracia suffered cardiac arrest. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: CBS Boston Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Read About H & H Medical Corp. ’s New Hydrogel Seal Packaging to Expedite Trauma Treatment
H&H Medical Corp.’s new DualSeal occlusive chest dressing pack has been covered in a June 12 article on Qmed, “Trauma Care Eased with New Package,” by Daphne Allen. Corina Bilger, director of global sales, H&H Medical, told Qmed that “The DualSeal occlusive dressing pack is geared towards military and civilian users, primarily in emergency medicine and public safety (e.g., police, fire, EMS). We have seen interest in the product from wilderness/adventure customers for adding this to their first aid kits. There are needs in the field to respond to a casualty with multiple puncture injuries su...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: H & H Medical Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

Colo. Crews Rescue Climber After 100-Foot Fall
  DOUGLAS COUNTY, Colo. (Fox 31 Denver) - Crews rescued an injured climber from Devil's Head mountain in Pike National Forest on Sunday afternoon, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office said. The man suffered a back injury and head trauma, and is in critical condition, officials said. He was transported to a hospital. The sheriff's office, Douglas County Search and Rescue, firefighters and paramedics assisted in the rescue. Officials said the man was rock climbing when something went wrong with the rope he was using and he fell 100 feet, landing on a ledge around 30 to 40 feet high. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 19, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Anica Padilla, Fox 31 Denver Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Man Sues City After Jumping Out of Ambulance While Intoxicated
NEW YORK (AP) — A New York City man who says the city didn't do enough to keep him from drunkenly jumping out of the back of a moving ambulance has filed a lawsuit. Yaugeni Kralkin says he was intoxicated last June when he was picked up by EMTs. Court documents show police were needed to put the 54-year-old in an ambulance because he was being uncooperative. On the way to the hospital, he was able to unbuckle the straps on his stretcher and open the back door of the moving ambulance to jump out. The lawsuit says officials then found him unconscious in the street with severe injuries. Kralkin is suing the city, the fi...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 19, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Point-of-Care Ultrasound Helps Streamline Management of Cardiac Arrest
Point-of-care ultrasound plays an important role in the management of cardiac arrest, as Dr Matthew Reed, an Emergency Medicine consultant at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, explained: “We know that the prognosis for a patient with a beating heart is far better than for someone in cardiac standstill. Using ultrasound, we can see whether or not a patient remains in cardiac standstill following a period of intensive resuscitation, and may also be able to identify a previously undetected pathology – such as cardiac tamponade or ventricular fibrillation – that was not visible on the ECG. Ultrasound can also...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: FujiFilm SonoSite, Inc. Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

June 15th is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day
As the elderly population continues to grow, so does the likelihood of elder abuse taking place in our communities.  June 15th is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day and JEMS is pleased to provide several resources for more information about a difficult topic that often goes unreported. This year’s focus is financial exploitation, which is becoming prevalent in the elderly community.  According to the United Nations, 5 to 10 per cent of older people globally may experience some kind of financial exploitation. JEMS is excited to share with you an excellent resource from MerckManuals.com.  The content, which...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Sacramento, Calif. Paramedic Charged With Sexual Battery After Alleged Inappropriate Behavior With Patient
.mcclatchy-embed{position:relative;padding:40px 0 56.25%;height:0;overflow:hidden;max-width:100%}.mcclatchy-embed iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%} A Sacramento firefighter was formally charged with misdemeanor sexual battery Monday after a citizen’s complaint was filed in April. An investigation into alleged misconduct by firefighter Jared David Evans, 32, is being conducted by the Sacramento Police Department and the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office. “As soon as the complaint was received, we forwarded the complaint to local law enforcement,” said fire depar...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Walter Ko, Sacramento Bee Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

First Responders Rescue Construction Worker from Collapsed Trench
Warren, Mich. (WXYZ) - In Warren, Mich., first responders rescued a 37 year old Howell, Michigan construction worker after he became trapped in a collapsed trench.  He was rushed to the nearest trauma hospital, Beaumont Hospital, in Royal Oak and was reported to be in serious condition with injuries from the impact of the clay as well as shock.  Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WXYZ Detroit Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news