Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Bystander CPR Save Underscores Importance of Community Role
“Everyone has a part to play and when everything aligns, you get the best chance for a good outcome,” said Mike Roulette, an apparatus operator and paramedic with Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue in Portland, Oregon. Saves like the one involving Bob Brands are a daily reminder of why the work he does in the community is so important. Brands was taking a breather between go-kart races on Feb. 22, 2015, when he suddenly collapsed. An employee at the racing center immediately called 9-1-1. Evan Schenck, another racer, began CPR. Within moments, a sheriff’s deputy had arrived and was applying an automat...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeff A. Woodin, NRP, FAHA Tags: Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

A Closer Look at the Impact of Heroin Overdoses in Toledo, Ohio
TOLEDO, Ohio (13abc Action News) - The 43605 zip code has the highest number of heroin overdose in the city of Toledo and in Lucas County. Fire crews in the area responded to over 300 overdoses since the beginning of this year. There are some addresses that crews make multiple trips to, rescuing the same people multiple times. Raul is one of those people. He lives on Parker Street in East Toledo, and overdosed for the third time early on a November Morning. "Mam, I used to 100 dollars 200 dollars a day, I was bad." says Raul. While 13abc talks with Raul, a young 18-year old girl overdoses just a few feet fro...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 17, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: 13abc Action News Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Opioid Addiction Treatments Face Off in US Trial
CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol worked about the same as an older treatment, Suboxone. Both drugs had high relapse rates and there were overdoses, including fatal ones, in the experiment in 570 adults. The study , published Tuesday in the journal Lancet, is the first to compare the two drugs in the United States, where an opioid addiction epidemic has do...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Study Suggests Women Less Likely to Get CPR From Bystanders
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander and more likely to die, a new study suggests, and researchers think reluctance to touch a woman's chest might be one reason. Only 39 percent of women suffering cardiac arrest in a public place were given CPR versus 45 percent of men, and men were 23 percent more likely to survive, the study found. It involved nearly 20,000 cases around the country and is the first to examine gender differences in receiving heart help from the public versus  professional responders. "It can be kind of daunting thinking about pushing hard and fa...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation News Source Type: news

Woman Reunited with EMS Crew Who Saved Her Life
WASHINGTON (ABC7) — For 50-year-old D.C. resident, Kim Jenifer, Thursday was an emotional reunion. “Thank you so much!” She said, crying and hugging a first responder. “Ya’ll saved me. I can see my grandkids grow up and make sure they stay on the right track. It’s just a lot.” Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amy Aubert, WJLA Tags: News Videos Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

Is it an Emergency? Insurer Asks Patients to Question ED Visits
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Alison Wrenne was making waffles for her two young children one morning when abdominal pain forced her to the floor. A neighbor who is a physician assistant urged her to go to the emergency room. Wrong decision, according to her health insurer. Wrenne was diagnosed with a ruptured ovarian cyst, but Anthem said that wasn't an emergency and stuck her with a $4,110 bill. "How are you supposed to know that?" said the 34-year-old from Lexington, Kentucky. "I'm not a doctor ... that's what the emergency room is for." In an effort to curb unnecessary and costly ER visits, the Blue Cro...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tom Murphy, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Las Vegas Shooting Victims Search for Their Heroes
LOS ANGELES (AP) — As soon as Chris Gilman knew she would survive the gunshot wound she sustained in the Las Vegas massacre, she wanted to find the two strangers who saved her life — a man and woman whose names she didn't even know. She found a Facebook page called "Find My LV Hero" and posted a plea. "Looking for husband and wife who were by the VIP bleachers and helped me get out," wrote Gilman, of Bonney Lake, Washington. "My wife gave the husband her shirt and the wife held it against my side to stop bleeding as they carried me through the VIP area out to the street." Despite t...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 9, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda Lee Myers, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Mass Casualty Incidents Patient Care Source Type: news

Mobile Stroke Unit in New York Takes Treatment to the Patient
NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Ever see an ambulance stuck in traffic and say to yourself, “I hope they get to the person in time?” Seconds count in all emergency cases, but time is especially critical if the victim is having a stroke. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: CBS New York Tags: News Videos Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

Pennsylvania Trooper Saves Own Life With Tourniquet
A Pennsylvania State Police trooper who was shot several times during a traffic stop likely saved his own life by applying a tourniquet to his leg before help arrived, authorities said Wednesday as they released more details of the violent confrontation along a busy highway. Cpl. Seth Kelly, 39, remained hospitalized in critical condition after suffering gunshot wounds to his neck and shoulder area and to his leg in the close-quarters gunfight. The 13-year veteran was set to undergo another surgery to remove a bullet. "He's battling. He's certainly not out of the woods by any means, but ... he is a very strong individ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael Rubinkam, Associated Press Tags: Trauma Patient Care News Source Type: news

Public Schools in Richmond, Va. Equipped with Stop The Bleed Kits
RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — It’s every parent’s worst nightmare — a shooting at your child’s school. It’s something we all hope never happens, but now, local school staff are being equipped to respond if the worst were to ever occur. 8News got a look inside Richmond Public Schools as the new ‘bleed kits’ were delivered. Richmond Ambulance Authority and VCU Medical Center delivered the so-called “bleed kits,” or hemorrhage control kits, to Richmond Public Schools. The kits have essential tools to respond to an emergency. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 3, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Whitney Harris, WRIC Tags: News Videos Patient Care Operations Source Type: news

Mortality Rates for Overdose Patients Who Refuse Transport
This study was published March 28, 2016. The data obtained was from 2011-2013. Oh, how quickly things change in the drug trade. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported the number of opioid-related deaths in 2014 was a 9% increase from the previous year.1 The illegal drug trade changes every day. More potent forms of opioids are being manufactured, and with that, more deaths occur. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP, FAEMS Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Anticoagulant Reversal Drugs Stop Patient's Internal Hemorrhage
Pharmacology to the tune of anticoagulant reversal Your EMS flight crew is dispatched by rotor to a remote hospital in the Great Basin Desert for a patient with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The patient was brought in by her grandson. She was vomiting blood as well as suffering from bloody diarrhea. On arrival, you find an 80-year-old female sitting up in a hospital bed, although she's extremely weak. She has a Glasgow coma scale (GCS) of 15 and states she's been throwing up blood all day. She appears pale but is in no obvious distress. Her vital signs are a heart rate of 100 with regular pulse; blood pressure 60/35 mmHg...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brant Jaouen, MD Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Evaluating Temperature is Essential in the Prehospital Setting
Evaluating temperature is essential in the prehospital setting The measurement of patient temperature is, and has been, throughout the history of modern medicine, one of the four core physiological measurements that we collectively call "vital signs." Over the past decade we've added the measurement of oxygen saturation (transcutaneous pulse oximetry, or SpO2) as the fifth vital sign and we hope that in the near future we'll add end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) measurement as the sixth vital sign. Our review and discussion in this article will concentrate on the renewed importance, implications and technical meas...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joseph E. DiCorpo, BSC, MMSc, PA Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Identifying and Managing Accidental Hypothermia
Understanding, identifying & treating accidental hypothermia Learning Objectives Explain the four different ways a body can lose heat. Define the four stages of hypothermia and understand the assesment considerations. Understand the treatment strategies for accidental hypothermia. Key Terms Conduction: Transfer of heat to a solid object or a liquid by direct contact. Convection: Mechanism by which body heat is picked up and carried away by moving fluid currents. Core body temperature: The temperature in the part of the body comprising the heart, lungs, brain and abdominal viscera. Evapo...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Daniel Du Pont, BA, EMT Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

The Community Paramedicine Approach to the Opioid Epidemic
Managing the opioid epidemic with mobile integrated healthcare programs A recent meeting between police and recovering addicts provided fascinating insight into the great extent of the opioid epidemic. Most of the dozen or so officers in the workgroup shared that the epidemic had an impact on their personal lives. One detective shared that her colleagues, burned out from too many overdose responses, had verbally attacked her son when he was arrested for heroin use and possession. They told him he was a "scumbag" and an embarrassment to his mother. According to the detective, her son was neither-he was simply an a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dan Swayze, DrPH, MBA, MEMS Tags: Patient Care Mobile Integrated Healthcare Source Type: news

Quickly Recognizing a Life-Threatening Infection
Careful assessment helps recognize life-threatening infection You and an engine company arrive to a single family, two-story home. You're met at the door by a male in his late 20s. He says he called you after coming to check on his 58-year-old father after he missed their tee time. He found his father, Matt, lying in bed and unresponsive. He leads you upstairs to his father's bedroom and tells you his mom died two years ago and Matt now lives by himself. He isn't aware of his dad having any significant medical history. As you enter the bedroom you see Matt sleeping. His breathing is rapid and deep. His skin looks flushed f...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dennis Edgerly, EMT-P Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

EMS Physicians Laud Senate Passage of Bipartisan Bill Protecting Medical Treatment of Emergency Patients, Sponsored by Senators Bill Cassidy (Louisiana) and Michael Bennet (Colorado)
WASHINGTON, DC – The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) applauds the Senate’s passage of the Protecting Patient Access to Emergency Medications Act of 2017. The House of Representatives unanimously passed a similar version of the bill (H.R. 304) in January. The Senate-approved bill included minor technical changes from the House version requiring the House to approve the Senate version of the bill before it becomes law. This bipartisan legislation ensures emergency medical service (EMS) care providers, such as paramedics, are able to continue administering the appropriate life-saving emergency medi...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 27, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: National Association of EMS Physicians Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

4-Year-Old Patient Reunites With Paramedic Who Treated Him 2 Years Ago
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (11Alive.com) -- Four-year-old Dominic Mikowski has allergies to certain foods - eggs, in particular. It was 2 years ago that he had a bad reaction after eating pancakes, which triggered an interesting odyssey that has Dominic already considering a career as a paramedic. "He was at school and instead of giving him the breakfast we provided, they made a mistake and accidentally gave him the school breakfast," said Marie Sinclair, Dominic's mother. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 25, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brent Ashcroft, 11Alive.com Tags: Airway & Respiratory News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

9-1-1 Dispatcher Reunited with the Family Whose Baby She Helped Deliver
SPRINGDALE, Ark. (KFSM) -- A dispatcher with the Springdale Police Department is getting credit for helping bring a new life into the world. Monica Deason answered a father's call to 9-1-1 on Sept. 19 and helped deliver the baby via phone call. On that day, Courtney Velazquez said she was having contractions through out the day but when they went to the doctor, they were told they had a few hours. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: 5 News Web Staff, KFSM Tags: News Videos Patient Care Communications & Dispatch Source Type: news

Illinois Woman Thanks the First Responders Who Saved Her Daughter's Life
Lansing, Ill. (WGN9) - Three months ago, Elizabeth Avila’s life was turned upside down. Her 3-year-old daughter Teci choked on a grape and stopped breathing. "She was without oxygen for 19 minutes," she said. Teci was on life support for eight days, in the ICU for a month and was finally discharged from the hospital Wednesday. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kelly Davis, WGN9 Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Runner Collapses During Marathon, Nurse Rushes to Help
PORTLAND, Ore. (KGW) — It was the right place at the right time. A man running in the Portland Marathon found himself in a scary, life-threatening situation. Fortunately for him, a nurse running in the opposite direction jumped in to help. On Sunday, he got to meet her for the first time and thank her in person for saving his life. Dave Brenner has run more than 130 marathons. But as he waited for his turn to run in this year's Portland Marathon, he had no idea what would happen around mile 13. “Felt really good and felt a little light headed, and then it's like,' Oh, this isn't normal.’ I mean I've ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 16, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christine Pitawanich, KGW Tags: News Videos Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

H & H Medical Introduces the H*VENT Vented Chest Dressing
H&H Medical Corporation, a leading provider of emergency trauma products, is proud to announce the introduction of our newest product in our chest seal line, the H*VENT vented chest dressing. Open chest wounds that develop into a tension pneumothorax, commonly referred as a sucking chest wound, can be life threatening if not treated immediately by the first responder. The H*VENT from H&H Medical Products is an innovative chest seal that treats not only the presence of air in the chest (pneumothorax) but also allows fluids such as blood to be released from the chest (hemothorax). The unique six-port design of the H*...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 16, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: H & H Medical Tags: Patient Care Industry News Equipment & Gear Source Type: news

ZOLL Showcases New Ventilator Capabilities at AMTC 2017
CHELMSFORD, MASS.—ZOLL Medical Corporation, an Asahi Kasei Group Company that manufactures medical devices and related software solutions, will offer Air Medical Transport Conference 2017  (AMTC) attendees the opportunity to experience the new capabilities of its mechanical ventilation devices in booth 901 October 16-18 at the Fort Worth Convention Center in Fort Worth, Texas. Respiratory Care—Launching New Capabilities Using ZOLL’s EMV+ Ventilator, participants will experience firsthand how lungs adapt to each ventilator mode. With its unique Smart HelpT technology, ZOLL ventilators provid...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ZOLL Tags: Airway & Respiratory Cardiac Resuscitation Equipment Gear Operations Source Type: news

Flirtey Partners with Pioneering Ambulance Service to Launch First Emergency Drone Delivery Program in United States
RENO, Nev. -- Flirtey, the leading drone delivery service, and REMSA, a community-integrated emergency medical services provider, today announced a partnership to launch the first automated external defibrillator (AED) drone delivery service in the United States. Cardiac arrest is the leading cause of natural death in America, with more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cases each year, according to the American Heart Association. For every minute that a victim of cardiac arrest waits to receive defibrillation, their odds of survival decrease by about 10 percent. By using drones to deliver AEDs, Flirtey's technology will i...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Flirtey Tags: Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Cardiac Resuscitation Patient Care Operations Industry News Source Type: news

Get Ahead of Stroke Campaign Debuts App to Help EMS Assess Stroke Severity
Fairfax, Va. — The Get Ahead of Stroke campaign has debuted an app to help EMS first responders transport and triage patients quickly to stroke centers equipped to treat severe strokes. Called Stroke Scales for EMS, the app is designed to assist first responders in assessing stroke severity in emergency situations and, in cases of severe stroke, transport patients to neuroendovascular-ready stroke facilities. “Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability nationwide. This app will help first responders quickly and accurately identify cases of severe stroke so they can transport patients to appropriate treat...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Get Ahead of Stroke Campaign Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation Patient Care Communications Dispatch Industry News Source Type: news

Texas EMS System Saves Gunshot Patient with Blood Transfusion in the Field
CYPRESS, Texas (KTRK) -- Paramedics with Cypress Creek EMS most likely saved a gunshot patient's life over the weekend. But it was the groundbreaking technique that they used that not only set a milestone, but could also save countless lives across the country. Eyewitness News spoke with Wren Nealy this afternoon. He's the special operations manager for Cypress Creek EMS. Nealy said his agency is now one of only two EMS systems in the country to carry whole blood in the field at all times. "It's a true game changer," said Nealy. "You can bleed out and die within three to five minutes, depending on t...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: KTRK/ABC 13 Tags: Trauma News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Addressing Boston's 'Methadone Mile' and Other Drug Havens
BOSTON (AP) — A young woman crouches on a dusty strip of grass alongside a busy Boston thoroughfare and plunges a needle into her arm. Around the corner, a couple stands zombie-like in the middle of the sidewalk, oblivious to passing pedestrians on a muggy morning. Farther down the road, a man injects heroin into another man's hand beside a gas station convenience store. "It's hard to be out here and not be high, you know," said Jamie Allison, a 36-year-old woman with telltale black needle marks on her arms, shrugging as she took in the milieu from her curbside perch. "You need something just to get th...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 5, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Philip Marcelo, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Former EMT Jumps Into Action, Treats Victims at Las Vegas Shooting
Snohomish, Wash. (KIRO) - As a former firefighter and an EMT in Snohomish County, Scott Pettersen thought he'd seen nearly every kind of emergency. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 4, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Gary Horcher, KIRO Tags: Major Incidents Mass Casualty Incidents News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

New Resuscitation Device Provides Continuous Oxygen Delivery During CPR
"No pause should be your cause," or so French medical device manufacturer Vygon believes. In March, JEMS Editor-in-Chief A.J. Heightman and I traveled to Paris to attend a one-day emergency symposium titled, Alveolar Ventilation by Continuous Chest Compression: b-card, a new device designed for use during cardiac arrest management. During the symposium, current cardiac arrest guidelines, the Boussignac Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation Device (b-card) and how the two are interconnected were discussed. The b-card is available and in use in Europe and Canada; however, it's not available or approved for sale in the Unite...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 4, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: W. Scott Gilmore, MD, EMT-P Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Firefighters Help Develop Innovative New Patient Lifting Device
This article tells the story of recent innovations in patient lifting and transport that were designed in partnership with, and specifically for, emergency responders. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 4, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chuck Marble Tags: Patient Care Operations Source Type: news

Fresh Perspectives on Safer Patient Lifting and Moving
Lifting and moving are among the most important but dangerous endeavors in which EMS providers engage. The consequences of a misstep can be devastating and long-lasting. Consider the case of a healthy paramedic in a large municipal service. He was a former kickboxer and avid weightlifter at the time of his injury. On the day he was injured, he was taking a patient down a flight of stairs on a flexible Reeves stretcher. As he and his partner were descending the stairs, the patient moved, causing the EMS crew and patient to fall. The paramedic sustained a serious injury to his back. Due to the typical "I don't need help...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 4, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Niklavs Eglitis, BS, NRP Tags: Patient Care Operations Source Type: news

Why Do Family Members Choose to Stay or Leave During Resuscitation?
This study is a result of the PRESENCE trial which randomized 570 French family members, who were present in the home of a person in cardiac arrest, into either the intervention or control group. In the intervention group, the resuscitation team routinely asked the family members if they wanted to be present at the side of the patient being resuscitated. The control group didn't actively ask family members, but allowed them to independently decide their presence. They then categorized the family member's perception of their reason to be present or absent during the resuscitation. Four themes emerged: 1. Choosing to be acti...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 4, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP, FAEMS Tags: Columns Patient Care Source Type: news

Complicated Recovery Awaits Victims Injured in Vegas Attack
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Their concert turned into a siege, and now their lives may become a battle. The staggering count of people injured in the shooting at a Las Vegas music festival means their recoveries are likely to be as varied as the victims themselves. Some injuries are as simple as broken bones, others gunshot wounds involving multiple surgeries and potential transplants, and all come with the added emotional scars of enduring the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history, with 59 killed. At least 130 people remained hospitalized Tuesday, with 48 listed in critical condition. Hospitals said 185 others had already ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 4, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda Lee Myers and Mat Sedensky, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Mass Casualty Incidents Patient Care Source Type: news

NIH Releases New Online Tool to Support Alcohol Abuse Treatment
WASHINGTON (AP) — The phone calls come — from fellow scientists and desperate strangers — with a single question for the alcohol chief at the National Institutes of Health: Where can my loved one find good care to get sober? Tuesday, the government is releasing a novel online tool to help — directories of alcohol treatment providers paired with key questions patients should ask for a better shot at high-quality care. "Most people think treatment is detox for 28 days or Alcoholics Anonymous. There's a vast in-between," said George Koob, director of NIH's National Institute on Alcohol Abuse ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 3, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Las Vegas Hospitals See Impact of Mass Shooting
LAS VEGAS (AP) — The victims just kept coming. In cars, in ambulances waiting four or five deep, from the walking wounded to the barely alive, they arrived in droves. "I have no idea who I operated on," said Dr. Jay Coates, a trauma surgeon whose hospital took in many of the wounded after a gunman opened fire from his 32nd-floor hotel suite Sunday night on a country music concert below. "They were coming in so fast, we were taking care of bodies. We were just trying to keep people from dying." It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, with at least 59 killed and 527 injured, some...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 3, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda Lee Myers, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Mass Casualty Incidents Patient Care Operations Source Type: news

Helicopter Rescue in Nepalese Jungle
It's the middle of the day and the Grande International Hospital (GIH) EMS hotline receives a call from a group of travelers who had been out trekking in a remote jungle near Pokhara, Nepal, and had overturned their vehicle. The GIH-based helicopter EMS (HEMS) air ambulance team is activated. With three sets of jump bags always ready to go, responders go through their checklist as a call back is made to the patient party for additional details: two French citizens were injured after a brake failure overturned their vehicle. Once the team is fully prepared to tackle their condition, responders quickly make their way from th...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sanjaya  Karki, MD, MBBS Tags: International Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Nine Tips for Making a Good Impression with Your Patient
Making a good first impression is essential to establishing positive rapport with your patient. Within the first few seconds of that encounter, most patients will make a value judgment about whether they like you and whether they think you're competent to care for them. You don't get a second chance to make a great first impression! Studies show that people, including patients, are most likely to remember the beginning and the end of an encounter. This is called the "serial positioning effect." That's why, in addition to a positive first impression, a positive ending encounter with the patient is also very i...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stephen R. Wirth, Esq., EMT-P Tags: Columns Patient Care Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Firefighters Rescue Five Cats After Receiving Animal Oxygen Masks
TAYLOR, Pa. (WDAF-TV) – Newly donated oxygen masks helped save five pet cats after a fire Thursday morning in the Pennsylvania borough of Taylor, according to WNEP. The fire broke out after 10 a.m. in a building on Union Street, forcing seven people and several animals out of their homes. The Nykaza family told WNEP their badly-burned home has been in the family for generations, but now it's not clear if they'll ever be able to move back in again. Five family members were home when a stranger spotted smoke from the outside. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 29, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WDAF-TV Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

In Mexico, Survivors Recount Amazing Escapes From Quake
MEXICO CITY (AP) — A tree branch saved a maintenance mechanic from the collapsing building where a dozen co-workers died when last week's earthquake rocked central Mexico. A slap across the face startled a dazed father back to his senses, spurring him to carry his critically injured daughter to safety. Neighbors, co-workers and passers-by pulled people from the jaws of death, while taxis, private cars and even buses rushed them to hospitals. Amid the endless tragedies from the magnitude 7.1 quake that killed more than 300 people, there were incredible stories of survival. Conrad Vazquez Martinez, a 67-year-old mechan...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 28, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark Stevenson, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents Patient Care News Source Type: news

EMS Crews in St. Louis Area Compete in Warrior Challenge
St. Louis, Mo. (KSDK) - It was one part training exercise, one part friendly competition. Dozens of first responders from the St. Louis area competed in the second annual EMS Warrior Challenge, hosted by their supervisors through SSM Health. “It’s a skills challenge where we are testing not only physical, but mental abilities, and obstacles and different training aspects,” explained Dr. Justin Rapoff, who oversees the regional SSM Health EMS teams. Rapoff designed the course for the competition, which was held at Hidden Valley Ski Resort earlier this month. Teams of two from different ambulance distr...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 25, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jennifer Meckles, KSDK Tags: Training News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Sepsis Alliance Launches New Community Education Kit to Raise Sepsis Awareness Across America
Nearly half of Americans haven’t heard of sepsis, the body’s life-threatening response to infection that kills more than a quarter million people every year in the U.S. Sepsis Alliance, the nation’s leading sepsis advocacy organization, just launchead a new Sepsis 911 Community Education Kit that empowers sepsis advocates across the country to make a difference in their local community by spreading the word about sepsis. “There are passionate sepsis advocates in every corner of this country and Sepsis Alliance is excited to offer a new tool to help these leaders share their stories and raise sepsis ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 21, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sepsis Alliance Tags: Training Patient Care Source Type: news

Law Enforcement, State Attorneys Review 10 Patients who Died in Sweltering Nursing Home
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. (AP) — Ten elderly patients died after being kept inside a nursing home that turned into a sweatbox when Hurricane Irma knocked out its air conditioning for three days, even though just across the street was a fully functioning and cooled hospital. From the perspective of Florida Gov. Rick Scott and relatives of those at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, criminal charges are warranted. But under Florida law, a prosecution might be difficult. Two of three ex-state prosecutors contacted by The Associated Press had doubts as to whether Dr. Jack Michel, the home's owner, or any of his employee...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 21, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Terry Spencer, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Rapid Response Saves Veteran Firefighter and Paramedic Having Heart Attack
TUCKER, Ga. (Fox5 Atlanta) - The day that changed everything for Dave Galbraith began like any other. It was March 22,  2017.  Captain Galbraith was at his desk at DeKalb County Fire Rescue headquarters in Tucker. About 11 in the morning,  the then 46-year old veteran firefighter/paramedic began to feel off. "And started having a full, heavy, almost a pressure feeling in my torso, up into my shoulders, and down my arms," Galbraith says. So he got up and tried to walk off the pressure.Galbraith had spent years as a paramedic, working to save heart attack patients. Now, the paramedic w...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 21, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Beth Galvin, Fox 5 Atlanta Tags: News Videos Cardiac & Resuscitation Operations Source Type: news

FDA Issues Warning About Mixing Opioid Addiction Treatments With Other Meds
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration issued new warnings Wednesday about the dangers of combining medication for opioid addiction with anti-anxiety medicines and other drugs that also slow breathing and brain activity. The FDA warned that mixing such drugs can cause difficulty breathing, coma or death, so it should be done with caution. The agency said a growing number of people fighting opioid addiction with methadone or buprenorphine also take other prescription drugs that slow action of the central nervous system. The warning lists several dozen brand-name and generic drugs that could be risky, in...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Linda A. Johnson, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

H & H Medical Announces Acquisition of Rights to SWAT-T Tourniquet
H&H Medical Corporation, a leading provider of emergency trauma products, is proud to announce the acquisition of the right to produce the SWAT-T elastic tourniquet from TEMS Solutions, LLC. The addition of this product will expand H&H Medical’s line of “Stop The Bleed” products available to military and civilian customers worldwide. The SWAT-T was developed by a former Operator/Medic with 14 years’ experience in Operational Medicine - former USAF Pararescue Journeyman (Para-Jumper or PJ), Contractor DoJ/FBI SWAT Operations, National Registry Paramedic, and Emergency Medicine Physician. The ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 18, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: H & H Medical Tags: Trauma Industry News Equipment & Gear Source Type: news

Israeli Team Assisting Florida Keys Residents Save Dozens on Tuesday, To Continue Rescue Operations in the Area For the Duration of Mission  
Jerusalem - On Tuesday, the Israel Rescue Coalition and United Hatzalah first response teams divided up into two groups with one headed to Key West, and the other headed to Naples. In Naples, the team walked into pandemonium. Houses were completely destroyed and people were without food, water and electricity. The team was warned by local officials that there were groups of looters who had no hesitation to shoot at first responders. Luckily, the group did not encounter any of these groups. They worked with community centers that were taking in displaced people who had stayed in the city during the hurricane but were f...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 14, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: United Hatzalah Tags: Major Incidents Patient Care News Source Type: news

After Natural Disasters, Risk of Death and Injury Rises
ATLANTA (AP) — Irma's deadly rampage is over but authorities say the risk of deaths and injuries rises significantly after natural disasters. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says all kinds of hazards can endanger storm survivors, returning evacuees, emergency responders and cleanup crews. "The aftermath of disasters such as Hurricanes Harvey and Irma can be just as dangerous as the storms themselves," notes CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald. And Orlando Fire Department Lt. Aaron Rhodes, notes stress and fatigue can lead to trouble after a disaster: "For one, people get tired, people ge...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 14, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents Patient Care News Source Type: news

Deaths from Carbon Monoxide, Power Outages Reported After Irma
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. (AP) — Florida residents struggling to put their lives back together in Hurricane Irma's wake fell victim to new hazards, including oppressive heat, brush-clearing accidents, house fires and deadly fumes from generators. Five residents of a Hollywood nursing home that lost power in the storm died, authorities said Wednesday. They gave no immediate details on the cause. Police and fire crews began evacuating Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills after the deaths there. In the Miami area, a Coral Gables apartment building was evacuated after authorities determined a lack of power made it unsafe for e...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Terry Spencer and Jason Dearen, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents Patient Care News Source Type: news

Do You Listen to Heart Sounds? This May be Another Reason Why You Should.
I’m not sure about you, but when I went to school to become a paramedic (and a nurse for that matter), one thing I never really understood was heart sounds, or heart tones, depending on who taught you. My attempt at learning resorted to scouring textbooks, journals, online editorials, watching clips on YouTube and listening… lots of listening to sound bites from CDs. You know the ones, they come free when you buy a new stethoscope. Instead of turning to digital media, I should’ve been listening to the hearts of my patients. Hindsight is 20/20, especially in this case. All my self-guided education yielded...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Bruce Hoffman, MSN,BSN-RN, NR-P, CFRN Tags: Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

The Tourniquet Gap
The 2016 White House Stop The Bleed (STB) initiative was created to address specific medical issues surrounding the alarming increase in U.S. mass casualty Incidents (MCIs). Supported by recommendations from the Hartford Consensus1and lessons learned during military combat,2,3 the STB initiative seeks to: 1) train laypersons to provide hemorrhage control; and 2) strategically place hemorrhage control supplies in public spaces at highest risk for an MCI. National health organizations and industry leaders have embraced this well-constructed initiative. From this effort, there’s been some i...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elliot M. Ross, MD, MPH Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news