Metachronous colorectal cancer following segmental or extended colectomy in Lynch syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AbstractAround 5% of colorectal cancers are due to mutations within DNA mismatch repair genes, resulting in Lynch syndrome (LS). These mutations have a high penetrance with early onset of colorectal cancer at a mean age of 45  years. The mainstay of surgical management is either a segmental or extensive colectomy. Currently there is no unified agreement as to which management strategy is superior due to limited conclusive empirical evidence available. A systematic review and meta- analysis to evaluate the risk of metach ronous colorectal cancer (MCC) and mortality in LS following segmental and extensive colectomy. A systematic review of the PubMed database was conducted. Studies were included/ excluded based on pre-specified criteria. To assess the risk of MCC and mortality attributed to segmental or extensive cole ctomies, relative risks (RR) were calculated and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). Publication bias was investigated using funnel plots. Data about mortality, as well as patient ascertainment [Amsterdam criteria (AC), germline mutation (GM)] were also extracted. Statistical analysis was c onducted using the R program (version 3.2.3). The literature search identified 85 studies. After further analysis ten studies were eligible for inclusion in data synthesis. Pooled data identified 1389 patients followed up for a mean of 100.7 months with a mean age of onset of 45.5 years of age. A total 1119 patients underwent segmental colectomies with an...
Source: Familial Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

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Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer. This review gives an overview of the current knowledge of molecular mechanisms of colorectal carcinogenesis and the role of molecular testing in the management of CRC. The majority of CRCs arise from precursor lesions such as adenoma, transforming to adenocarcinoma. Three molecular carcinogenesis pathways have been identified; (1) chromosomal instability, (2) microsatellite instability (MSI), and (3) CpG island methylator phenotype, each account for ~85%, 15%, and 17%, respectively. Evaluation of MSI status, extended RAS mutation analysis, and BRAF mutati...
Source: Advances in Anatomic Pathology - Category: Pathology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
AbstractLynch syndrome accounts for 3 –5% of colorectal cancers and is due to a germline mutation in one of the mismatch repair genesMLH1,MSH2,MSH6, andPMS2. Somatic hypermethylation of theMLH1 promoter is commonly associated to sporadic cases. Strategies have been developed to identify patients with Lynch Syndrome based on clinical findings, tumoral phenotype, family history and immunohistochemistry analysis. However, there still are some pitfalls in this strategy, possibly responsible for an underdiagnosis of Lynch syndrome. Here we report the case of a 37 years-old man presenting with two concomitant tumors locate...
Source: Familial Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of reviewDecades have passed since the underlying molecular etiologies of the most common hereditary forms of colorectal cancer (CRC), Lynch syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) were first described. With the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels, the landscape of hereditary CRC testing has changed dramatically. We review available screening strategies, novel CRC predisposition genes, and challenges and opportunities in this field.Recent findingsImproved sensitivity and availability of NGS panel testing have greatly expanded our understanding regarding the number of CRC syndromes a...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
We report the case of a Lynch syndrome patient with metastatic CRC and urothelial cancer who was treated sequentially with pembrolizumab (targeting PD1), atezolizumab (targeting PD‐L1), brief rechallenge with pembrolizumab, and finally the combination of ipilimumab (targeting CTLA‐4) and nivolumab (targeting PD1). Over a 28‐month period the patient experienced prolonged disease control with each different regimen the first time it was given, including metabolic response by positron emission tomography and computed tomography scanning and tumor marker reductions. The case suggests that some patients with advanced MMR...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Precision Medicine Clinic: Molecular Tumor Board, Gastrointestinal Cancer Precision Medicine Clinic: Molecular Tumor Boards Source Type: research
An estimated 130,000 individuals are diagnosed with colorectal carcinoma each year, and approximately 50,000 will die from this disease, making colorectal carcinoma the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.1 Heritable forms of colorectal carcinoma are common. These heritable conditions may manifest as a polyposis or as colorectal carcinoma. In this review, the pathology of hamartomatous polyps will be discussed with particular emphasis on clues that should alert pathologists to the possibility of a polyposis syndrome.
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - Category: Pathology Authors: Tags: Mini-symposium: Gastrointestinal/Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Pathology Source Type: research
Since 2017, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has recommended molecular testing of all patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) to identify those with suspected Lynch syndrome who should be referred to clinical genetics for germline testing. The pathway involves firstly determining the mismatch repair (MMR) expression status by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or performing microsatellite instability testing. This may be followed by BRAF V600E mutation testing and then MLH1 promoter hypermethylation analysis depending on the result.
Source: Diagnostic Histopathology - Category: Pathology Authors: Tags: Mini-symposium: Gastrointestinal/Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our results suggest that transcriptional patterns are indicative for TMM pathway activation with subtle differences between TEL and ALT mechanisms in a CRC subtype-specific fashion. Sequencing data potentially provide a suited measure to study alterations of telomere length and of underlying transcriptional regulation. Further studies are needed to improve this method.
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of reviewIdentification of Lynch syndrome is important from an individual patient and public health standpoint. As paradigms for Lynch syndrome diagnosis have shifted in recent years, this review will discuss rationale and limitations for current strategies as well as provide an overview of future directions in the field.Recent findingsIn recent years, the use of clinical criteria and risk scores for identification of Lynch syndrome has been augmented by universal testing of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancers with molecular methods to screen for mismatch repair deficiency with high sensitivity and speci...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION:  LS colonic and extracolonic clinical management, surveillance and therapy are complex and several aspects remain unclear. In the future, surveillance and clinical management need to be more tailored to gene and gender. Future prospective trials are needed. PMID: 31739377 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Zeitschrift fur Gastroenterologie - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Z Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominant hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome caused by pathogenic germline variants in DNA mismatch repair genes (MMR) MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. LS accounts for 3 –5% of all colorectal cancers (CRC). LS associated CRC generally has microsatellite instability and lacks for MMR protein expression. The risk of CRC in LS patients is between 10 and 82% depending on the involved MMR gene. LS patients are at high risk to develop synchronous/metachronous cancer bot h colonic and extracolonic (e.g.
Source: Digestive and Liver Disease - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
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