Opioid Addiction Treatments Face Off in US Trial

CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol worked about the same as an older treatment, Suboxone. Both drugs had high relapse rates and there were overdoses, including fatal ones, in the experiment in 570 adults. The study , published Tuesday in the journal Lancet, is the first to compare the two drugs in the United States, where an opioid addiction epidemic has doctors and policymakers deeply divided over treatment strategies. Many addiction treatment programs don't offer either medication, or only one of them. "Let's not keep arguing about the exact batting averages of these two things," and make them more available, said study co-author Dr. Joshua Lee of New York University School of Medicine. President Donald Trump recently declared the crisis a national public health emergency. Overdoses, most involving prescription painkillers and other opioids, killed 64,000 people in the United States last year. "Addiction medicine physicians are hungry to get data, especially from head-to-head comparisons like this one," said Dr. Joseph Garbely of Pennsylvania-based Caron Treatment Centers, who wasn't involved in the research. A smaller Norwegian study, published last month, also found the two medications ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: A high level of willingness to wear an overdose detection device was observed in this setting and a range of factors associated with overdose were positively associated with willingness. Since some factors, such as homelessness may be a barrier, further research is needed to investigate explanations for unwillingness and to evaluate real world acceptability of a wearable overdose detection devices as this technology becomes available. PMID: 31269963 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Addiction Science and Clinical Practice - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addict Sci Clin Pract Source Type: research
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; 2018), an estimated 68% of the 70,200 drug overdose deaths in the United States (US) in 2017 involved the use of an opioid. In fact, the number of drug overdose deaths that implicated opioids increased six-fold between 1999 and 2017 (CDC, 2018). In the current climate of the opioid addiction epidemic, various stakeholders are calling for tighter opioid access policies, more rigorous prescribing standards, and increasingly tailored patient and community education mechanisms (Christie et al., 2017; National Academies of Sciences [NAS], 2017; National Academy of Medicine, 2017).
Source: Nursing Outlook - Category: Nursing Authors: Source Type: research
You're reading Options to Opioids: How to Manage Chronic Pain Without Prescribing Pain-Killers, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. While there is considerable debate as to how much blame doctors should be assigned for the ongoing opioid crisis, there is little doubt they can do something to curtail it -- that instead of prescribing drugs that have been found to be highly addictive they can resort to alternate forms of pain management. Doctors’ prescription of powerful painkillers like OxyContin is frequ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: health and fitness addiction health and wellness opioids self improvement Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: With approximately 100 million people suffering from both chronic and acute pain in the United States (US) in 2016, opiates will continue to remain a prominent class of medication in healthcare facilities and homes across the US. Over 66% of total overdose episodes in 2016 were opioid-related, a figure that attests to the severity and wide-spread nature of this issue. A three-point approach accentuating the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of both those currently affected and at-risk in the future may be the comprehensive solution.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Source Type: research
With the opioid epidemic now claimingnearly 2000 lives from overdose in the United States each month, the medical profession is increasingly accepting the assessment of noted surgeon and writer Atul Gawande, MD:“We started it.” Specialty societies such as theAmerican Academy of Family Physicians andAmerican College of Physicians are offering tools to reduce the unnecessary use of opioids for pain and the risk of addiction. The Federation of State Medical Boards has releasedguidelines for the treatment of chronic pain, and many state medical boards have adopted their own policies. Physicians are responding. Sinc...
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusion
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs
Deaths from opioid overdoses have increased dramatically over the last decade. In 2017, the latest year for which the U.S. government has statistics on the trend, more than 47,000 Americans died of opioid overdoses. One major factor contributing to the rising number of people who get addicted to opioids and die from overdoses is the increasing number of prescriptions written by doctors to treat pain. Overdose deaths related to such prescriptions increased five times from 1999 to 2017. But according to the latest study looking at opioid prescribing patterns, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, recent efforts t...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs Source Type: news
Zach (left) and Bob (right) According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more than 70,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2017, including illicit drugs and prescription opioids, a two-fold increase in a decade. Opioids include prescription opioids and methadone, heroin, and other synthetic narcotics like fentanyl. Bob Paff has directly suffered the casualties of this epidemic. On January 21 of this year he lost his son Zach to an accidental overdose of fentanyl. A highly sought-after communications expert, business leader, and internationally recognized author, Bob now uses his communications platform to bring ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Recovery Stigma Opioid Epidemic Opioids Suicide synthetic fentanyl Source Type: blogs
The cell phone blares out reveille. Your eyes open reluctantly and you realize it’s morning, having only gone to bed four hours earlier because of a late-night party. You creak out of bed to ready yourself for work, arthritic joints hurting much more than usual. A painful day lies ahead even after taking ibuprofen. Does this sound familiar? If it does, you are not alone. Nearly 70% of Americans report getting insufficient sleep on a regular basis, and approximately 20% of Americans suffer from chronic pain. Recently, the intersection between these two conditions has become more apparent. The association between sleep...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Pain Management Sleep Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Our results suggest Medicaid expansion benefited a population with unique needs, and that Medicaid expansion could be a valuable tool in addressing the opioid overdose epidemic.
Source: Medical Care - Category: Health Management Tags: Brief Reports Source Type: research
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