Cross-talk between enzymes that read and correct recipes in the cookbook of life
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Even the best chef can make mistakes - even when using the recipes (genes) from the 'cookbook of life' -- DNA. A new discovery as to how cells repair their DNA may have implications for the future drug development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Whisky Knows Her Toys
A Border collie in Norway learned the names and categories of her many, many toys, just by playing a game with her owners. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Gorman Tags: Animal Cognition Dogs Scientific Reports (Journal) Oregon State University Udell, Monique A R Claudia Fugazza your-feed-science Source Type: news

Anterior cruciate ligament-return to sport after injury scale: validation of the Norwegian language version - Faleide AGH, Inderhaug E, Vervaat W, Breivik K, Bogen BE, Mo IF, Tr øan I, Strand T, Magnussen LH.
PURPOSE: Evidence is emerging on the importance of psychological readiness to return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (ACL-RSI) is developed to assess this. The aim of the current st... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Light Sedation, No Sedation Mortality Comparable in Ventilated ICU Patients Light Sedation, No Sedation Mortality Comparable in Ventilated ICU Patients
Among intensive care unit patients receiving mechanical ventilation, it makes little difference whether they are receiving light sedation with daily interruption or no sedation at all when it comes to 90-day mortality rates, ICU-free days or ventilator-free days, according to a comparison involving 700 patients treated in Denmark, Norway and Sweden.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - February 19, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Critical Care News Source Type: news

Are robots designed to include the LGBTQ+ community?
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Robot technology is flourishing in multiple sectors of society, including the retail, health care, industry and education sectors. However, are the perspectives of minority groups, such as the LGBTQ+ community, considered in robot and AI development? (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Going On A Cruise? Here ’ s How The Coronavirus Will Change Your Trip
(CNN) — Royal Caribbean normally encourages cruise-goers to drop off their luggage, hop on the ship and run off to enjoy their vacations. That’s all changed since the coronavirus outbreak. Spooked by the deadly disease, cruise companies around the world are imposing extraordinary measures to curb its spread, from taking passengers’ temperature before boarding to denying entry to people who’ve recently visited China. Those fears were on full display in the past two weeks, with at least three cruises being quarantined after some passengers showed symptoms. CBS New York: Cruise Ship Passengers Screened...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Coronavirus Source Type: news

Mediterranean sea urchins are more vulnerable than previously thought
(University of Barcelona) The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, an eatable species of great commercial interest found in the Mediterranean and North-East Atlantic, is more vulnerable than so far believed. This is stated in a study by the University of Barcelona, the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the University of Troms ø (Norway) on the genetic distribution of populations of this species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Life satisfaction and mental health among transgender students in Norway - Anderssen N, Sivertsen B, L ønning KJ, Malterud K.
BACKGROUND: Social attitudes to transgender persons and other gender minorities vary around the world, and in many cultures, prejudices and social stigma are common. Consequently, transgender persons face challenges related to discrimination and negative a... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Action competence after the course "First Aid in Suicide Hazard" - a quantitative study from ten Norwegian municipalities - Skrindo AS, S æheim A.
The workshop Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) is delivered by the organisation Vivat Suicide Prevention (Vivat). Vivat is one of the suicide preventive actions from the Norwegian Directorate of Health. In a quantitative survey, we looke... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news

Vision may be the real cause of children's problems
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Do you have poor motor skills or struggle to read, write or solve math problems? Maybe it's really because of how your brain interprets what it sees. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Trees struggle when forests become too small
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) As forest areas shrink and become fragmented, many tree species face problems. They often rely on animals that can no longer disperse their seeds effectively. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Major boost to open access publishing as Norway signs new national agreement
(Frontiers) A landmark national agreement has today been signed by the Norwegian Directorate for ICT and Joint Services in Higher Education& Research (Unit) and the leading open access publisher Frontiers. The terms of the agreement will simplify the publishing process for Norwegian researchers who publish in Frontiers' journals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dugnad: a fact and a narrative of Norwegian prosocial behavior - Simon C, Mobekk H.
Evolved mechanisms of phenotypic plasticity, which are evolutionary processes in their own right, enable species to respond adaptively to their environments. The Scandinavian countries, and Norway in particular, have for many years scored exceptionally hig... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Plane travel destroys polar bear habitat
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) A group of polar bear researchers wants you to do more than worry about the fate of these beautiful animals. They've calculated how much summer sea ice is melted per metric ton of CO2 emissions. Then you can decide if the flight you're planning to take is worth destroying polar bear habitat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'We need to make sure that we are always something else': victim support organisations and the increasing responsibility of the state in supporting crime victims in Finland and Norway - Helminen M.
In response to international obligations many Western states have strengthened their responsibility for crime victims' access to support services. This is also the case in Finland and Norway where this interview study explored the views of representatives ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Keeping Up with Personalized Medicine: Adapting to Meet Patients ’ Needs
Medical technology is revolutionizing healthcare for patients worldwide and is now more than ever becoming crucial in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and management of numerous diseases. We are increasingly seeing the ability of medical technology to personalize treatments and target patients’ individual needs. However, to ensure we are enabling access to these treatments, regulatory agencies need to consider new approaches to the approval process. Historically, product approvals have focused on the standardization of a drug or a therapy to treat a large population of people with the same disease, s...
Source: MDDI - January 22, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mike Izon Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

How the Digital Marketplace Is Changing the Way We Eat
This article was originally published onDigital @ DAI. You can read it here.  (Source: IntraHealth International)
Source: IntraHealth International - January 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: Nutrition Digital Health Source Type: news

Trust after terror: institutional trust among young terror survivors and their parents after the 22nd of July terrorist attack on Ut øya Island, Norway - Nilsen LG, Thoresen S, Wentzel-Larsen T, Dyb G.
In the aftermath of terrorist attacks and disasters, public institutions play an important role in re-establishing safety and justice. However, little is known about the importance of institutional trust for victims' potential for healing in the aftermath ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Associations between psychoactive substance use and sensation seeking behavior among drivers in Norway - Jamt REG, Gjerde H, Furuhaugen H, Romeo G, Vindenes V, Ramaekers JG, Bogstrand ST.
BACKGROUND/AIM: Drug use and risky driving is associated with sensation seeking. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between use of psychoactive substances and levels of the sensation seeking personality trait as measured with the Brie... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

How you 'attach' to people may explain a lot about your inner life
Early interactions with caregivers can dramatically affect your beliefs about yourself, your expectations of others, and how you cope with stress and regulate your emotions as an adultIn 2006, a team of Norwegian researchers set out to study how experienced psychotherapists help people to change. Led by Michael R ønnestad, a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Oslo, the teamfollowed 50 therapist-patient pairs, tracking, in minute detail, what the therapists did that made them so effective. Margrethe Halvorsen, a post-doc at the time, was given the job of interviewing the patients at the end of the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Elitsa Dermendzhiyska Tags: Psychology Mental health Family Relationships Science Parents and parenting Life and style Source Type: news

How you attach to people may explain a lot about your inner life
Early interactions with caregivers can dramatically affect your beliefs about yourself, your expectations of others, and how you cope with stress and regulate your emotions as an adultIn 2006, a team of Norwegian researchers set out to study how experienced psychotherapists help people to change. Led by Michael R ønnestad, a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Oslo, the teamfollowed 50 therapist-patient pairs, tracking, in minute detail, what the therapists did that made them so effective. Margrethe Halvorsen, a post-doc at the time, was given the job of interviewing the patients at the end of the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Elitsa Dermendzhiyska Tags: Psychology Mental health Family Relationships Science Parents and parenting Life and style Source Type: news

From as young as 4, children see males as more powerful than females
(CNRS) As early as 4 years old, children associate power and masculinity, even in countries considered to be more egalitarian like Norway. This is what scientists at the Institut des Sciences Cognitives Marc Jeannerod (CNRS/UCBL1) report, in collaboration with the universities of Oslo (Norway), Lausanne and Neuch â tel (Switzerland), in a study published on Jan. 7, 2020, in Sex Roles. They also show that in some situations the power-masculinity association does not manifest in girls. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Here Are 50 of the Best Workout Songs to Get You Motivated
With the thrill of New Year’s resolutions behind us and a long winter ahead, it can be hard to keep going with workout goals. But sometimes, all you need is the right song to give you the push you need to keep at it — whether running, biking or weight lifting. TIME is here to help with an essential workout playlist: a mix of songs that are tried-and-tested crowd favorites and some deeper cuts worth your attention from recent years and beyond. Normani’s “Motivation,” Lizzo’s “Good As Hell” and Travis Scott’s “Sicko Mode” are just the beginning; from hip-hop t...
Source: TIME: Health - January 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Raisa Bruner Tags: Uncategorized clickmonsters Music Source Type: news

Drinking stories as a narrative genre: the five classic themes - Sandberg S, Tutenges S, Pedersen W.
Drinking stories feature widely in Western societies. Many people eagerly share their stories in the aftermath of drinking events. These stories are also common in books, movies, music and the media. Based on qualitative interviews with 104 young Norwegian... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Little in Norway: a prospective longitudinal community-based cohort from pregnancy to child age 18 months - Moe V, Fredriksen E, Kjellevold M, Dahl L, Markhus MW, Stormark KM, von Soest T, Olafsen KS, Vannebo UT, Smith L.
PURPOSE: The Little in Norway (LiN) project is a cross-disciplinary prospective longitudinal study starting in pregnancy. It was set up to investigate maternal and paternal mental health functioning in the transition to parenthood, detect pathways to healt... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Reporters Pick Their Favorite Global Stories Of The Decade
The topics range from a ticking time bomb in the Arctic to the art of taking selfies in an ethical way. Here are the stories selected by our contributors.(Image credit: From left: John Poole/NPR; Jason Beaubien/NPR; Courtesy of Be Girl Inc.; SAIH Norway/Screenshot by NPR; Marc Silver/NPR ) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marc Silver Source Type: news

Fecal-Microbiota Transplantation Improves IBS Symptoms Fecal-Microbiota Transplantation Improves IBS Symptoms
Fecal-microbiota transplantation (FMT) improves symptoms and quality of life in patients with irritable-bowel syndrome (IBS), researchers from Norway report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Little reason for moral panicking after #MeToo
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Men and women generally agree on what constitutes sexual harassment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hodeidah still most dangerous place in Yemen
One year since Stockholm Agreement, Hodeidah is still most dangerous place in Yemen for civilians. A quarter of all civilian casualties across Yemen in 2019 were recorded in Hodeidah governorate. Despite a ceasefire in the port city being at the heart of last year’s Stockholm Agreement, Hodeidah has seen 799 civilian casualties since the Agreement was signed, the highest toll countrywide.   Families continue to flee for their lives with close to 390,000 Yemenis uprooted from their homes across the country so far in 2019. Half of all those displaced came from just three governorates – Hajjah, Hode...
Source: Doctors of the World News - December 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Weather and daily mobility in international perspective: a cross-comparison of Dutch, Norwegian and Swedish city regions - B öcker L, Priya Uteng T, Liu C, Dijst M.
With climate change, weather has emerged as an important theme in transport research and planning. Although recent studies demonstrate profound weather effects on mobility in single case study areas, international cross-comparisons are required to reveal h... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

How minds make meaning
(Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics) Meaning is central to language. But how do we combine the building blocks of thought and language to compose meaning? A special issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, edited by Andrea E. Martin from the Max Planck Institute of Psycholinguistics and Giosu è Baggio from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, brings together fifteen contributions from the fields of linguistics, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and computer science to answer this age-old question. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Countering right-wing extremism: lessons from Germany and Norway - Hardy K.
The growing threat of right-wing extremism (RWE) creates challenges for countering violent extremism (CVE) strategies. For countries like Australia with little historical background in countering RWE, there is a need to update and adapt CVE programs that w... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Gaming their way to sustainable development
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Researchers wanted to involve local people living around Kenya and Tanzania's Serengeti-Mara parks in developing a sustainable future for them and the parks. They developed a board game to get people talking to the researchers -- and to each other. That game has now won an international award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scandinavians' little linguistic hat trick
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Moving a word to the beginning of a sentence is a useful trick to draw attention to the most important topic you want to relay. The researchers of a new study have found that the Scandinavian languages are unique in their use of this technique. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gastric Bypass Surgery Linked to Bone-Strength Improvement in New Study Gastric Bypass Surgery Linked to Bone-Strength Improvement in New Study
Bone strength increases in the year after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in patients with and without type 2 diabetes, researchers from Norway report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - December 10, 2019 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Orthopaedics News Source Type: news

The role of social cognition in perceived thresholds for transport mode change - Nordfj ærn T, Lind HB, Şimşekoğlu, Jørgensen SH, Lund IO, Rundmo T.
This article is based on a study that investigated social cognitive psychological factors associated with economic thresholds related to using public or other sustainable transport modes. A survey was conducted using a random sample of the Norwegian popula... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Pedestrians and Bicycles Source Type: news

Elsevier Signs Open Access Deal with U.S. Institution
Elsevier, which now describes itself as an “information analytics business,” has inked an open-access agreement with Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), the first U.S. institution to enter such an agreement with Elsevier. The “transformative agreement” was announced on November 22, 2019. The agreement allows researchers at CMU to both publish open-access articles in any Elsevier journal and access paywalled Elsevier articles by paying one flat fee. Previously, publishing and accessing open-access articles involved two separate payment mechanisms. CMU was engaged in negotiations for an open-access dea...
Source: Public Policy Reports - December 10, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Childhood abuse and unplanned pregnancies: a cross-sectional study of women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study - Drevin J, Hallqvist J, Sonnander K, Rosenblad A, Pingel R, Bjelland EK.
OBJECTIVE: To study if childhood emotional, physical and sexual abuse are determinants for having an unplanned pregnancy, if the categories of abuse interact, and if a potential bias due to the selection of the participants (collider stratification bias) c... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Who dies early? Education, mortality and causes of death in Norway - Grytten J, Skau I, S ørensen R.
We estimated the effects of education on mortality and causes of death in Norway. We identified causal effects by exploiting the staggered implementation of a school reform that increased the length of compulsory education from seven to nine years. The mun... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

19 people report illness on cruise ship in California
Authorities were called to evaluate patients on a Norwegian Cruise Line ship. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - December 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Can the use of road safety measures on national roads in Norway be interpreted as an informal application of the ALARP principle? - Selvik JT, Elvik R, Abrahamsen EB.
The ALARP principle, stating that risks should be reduced to a level "As Low As Reasonably Practicable", is widely known and discussed in risk management. The principle is flexible, as the interpretation of the key concepts of reasonable and practicable ca... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Public acceptance of driverless shuttles in Norway - Roche-Cerasi I.
The main objective of the present study is to evaluate individuals' views on the usefulness of driverless shuttles and to examine if the provision of better access to public transit (thanks to the connection provided by shuttles) would make them consider p... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Perception and Communication, Warnings, Operating Instructions Source Type: news

Gastric Bypass Beats Sleeve Gastrectomy for Diabetes Remission Gastric Bypass Beats Sleeve Gastrectomy for Diabetes Remission
Among obese patients with type 2 diabetes, gastric bypass is associated with higher rates of diabetes remission at one year than is sleeve gastrectomy, researchers from Norway report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - November 26, 2019 Category: Surgery Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

It ’s Not Just Flooding in Venice. Here’s How Climate Change Threatens World Heritage Sites Everywhere
Venice is reeling from the worst flooding the city has experienced in 50 years, the city is “on its knees,” Venetian Mayor Luigi Brugnaro tweeted as water submerged much of the the famous historical city. The floods penetrated Saint Mark’s Basilica, a 1,000 year old church that is considered to be one of the finest examples of Byzantine architecture in the world and one of the city’s most famous landmarks. While floods are a normal part of life in Venice, which is famously built on a lagoon at the edge of the Adriatic Sea, they have never happened with such frequency before. Experts say that climate...
Source: TIME: Science - November 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Science Source Type: news

Buy less, be happier and build a healthy planet
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) You may feel like you can't do anything to stop climate change. But climate activists who joined in grassroots movements managed to cut their carbon footprints and were still happier than their non-activist peers, new research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Settled status: UNISON can help
After the EU referendum the government decided to introduce a new immigration status for EU citizens called ‘settled status’. What does this mean? People who are citizens or have a passport of a European Union member state, or Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Switzerland, and are in the UK by the 31 December 2020, are required to apply (along with family members) to the EU settlement scheme to continue living and working in the UK after 30 June 2021. The Home Office campaign does not cover the full range of citizens who can apply under the scheme. The messaging is centred on “white” EU/EEA/Swiss c...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - November 21, 2019 Category: Food Science Authors: Janey Starling Tags: Article BREXIT EU EU Citizens eu migrant migrant workers Source Type: news

Artificial Intelligence Could Help Solve America ’s Impending Mental Health Crisis
Five years from now, the U.S.’ already overburdened mental health system may be short as many as 15,600 psychiatrists as the growth in demand for their services outpaces supply, according to a 2017 report from the National Council for Behavioral Health. But some proponents say that, by then, an unlikely tool—artificial intelligence—may be ready to help mental health practitioners mitigate the impact of the deficit. Medicine is already a fruitful area for artificial intelligence; it has shown promise in diagnosing disease, interpreting images and zeroing in on treatment plans. Though psychiatry is in many...
Source: TIME: Health - November 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence Mental Health/Psychology MSFTAI2019 Source Type: news

Correlates of commuter cycling in three Norwegian counties - Nordengen S, Ruther DC, Riiser A, Andersen LB, Solbraa A.
Globally, there is an increasing challenge of physical inactivity and associated diseases. Commuter cycling is an everyday physical activity with great potential to increase the health status in a population. We aimed to evaluate the association of self-re... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Pedestrians and Bicycles Source Type: news

Nisonic Demonstrates Automatic Measurements of Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter as a Marker for Increased Intracranial Pressure Using Transorbital Ultrasound at Medica In Düsseldorf, Germany
DÜSSELDORF, Germany, Nov. 18, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Nisonic AS, a startup co-founded by SINTEF and Cofounder in Norway, aims to make intracranial pressure (ICP) assessment as simple and easy as measuring body temperature. ... Devices, Neurosurgery, Monitoring Nisonic , intracranial pressure, ICP , optic nerve sheath (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - November 18, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Fractures diagnosed in primary care - a five-year retrospective observational study from a Norwegian rural municipality with a ski resort - Vabo S, Steen K, Brudvik C, Hunskaar S, Morken T.
Objective: The aim of this study was to characterize fractures recorded at a Norwegian primary care centre near a ski resort.Design: A retrospective five-year observational study in the period 2010-2014.Setting: A primary care centre e... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news