Why did the passenger pigeon die out?
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) The passenger pigeon was once among the most numerous species on earth. The last passenger pigeon died in the Cinncinati Zoo just over 100 years ago. How did it all go so wrong? (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

More green for green power: Investors are migrating from the fossil fuel industry toward alternative energy
(Natural News) Times are truly changing especially for green power. Renewable energy, once limited to off-the-grid energy sources which pale in comparison to traditional energy, is steadily gaining ground. In November last year, Norway, one of Europe’s largest oil producers, had announced that it is looking to divest its funding of international petroleum companies. The... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Olympics-Norway's Cross-country Success Clouded by Asthma Drug Ethics Olympics-Norway's Cross-country Success Clouded by Asthma Drug Ethics
Norway's cross-country skiers will arrive in Pyeongchang hoping to continue their recent dominance in a sport that doubles as a national obsession, but even at home there are questions over the ethical use of medicines by athletes.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - January 9, 2018 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Orthopaedics News Source Type: news

Work environment and health in the fishing fleet: results from a survey amongst Norwegian fishers - S ønvisen SA, Thorvaldsen T, Holmen IM, Øren A.
BACKGROUND: Fishery is an important industry in Norway. Compared to other industries the number of occupational accidents is high. Fishers are exposed to a range of unfavourable working conditions, but there is limited research-based knowledge about the in... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news

Heart Benefit of Moderate Drinking Greater in Wealthy People Heart Benefit of Moderate Drinking Greater in Wealthy People
People who enjoy a few cocktails each week may be less likely to die from heart disease than people who rarely or never drink, especially if they ’ re rich, a Norwegian study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

A photovoice study of school belongingness among high school students in Norway - Lieblein VSD, Warne M, Huot S, Laliberte Rudman D, Raanaas RK.
Although high school graduation is important for living conditions and health throughout life, many students do not complete. In Norway's northern most county, Finnmark, up to 45% of students do not complete high school. Contrary to prior research that has... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Overweight children more likely to underestimate their body size
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Overweight children are less accurate in estimating their own body size than normal weight children. And the bigger their body size, the more inaccurate their guesses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart benefit of moderate drinking greater in wealthy people
(Reuters Health) - - People who enjoy a few cocktails each week may be less likely to die from heart disease than people who rarely or never drink, especially if they ’re rich, a Norwegian study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Moderate drinking is good for your heart if you're rich
A Norwegian study of more than 200,000 people showed that the risks posed by drinking alcohol varied depending on how wealthy people are. Rich, moderate drinkers fare best. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Moderate drinking is good for your heart - if you're rich
A Norwegian study of more than 200,000 people showed that the risks posed by drinking alcohol varied depending on how wealthy people are. Rich, moderate drinkers fare best. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Traumatic events increase headaches and migraines
(Reuters Health) - - Teens exposed to traumatic or terror events may have a higher risk for weekly and daily migraines, according to a study of adolescents who survived a terror attack in Norway. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Booze May Help or Harm the Heart, But Income Matters
TUESDAY, Jan. 2, 2018 -- Alcohol's effect on heart health, good or ill, may rely in part on the drinker's income, new research suggests. For example, the study of more than 200,000 Norwegian adults found that having a few drinks per week was linked... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Link between alcohol consumption and cardiovascular death depends on socioeconomics
(PLOS) Very frequent consumption of alcohol is associated with an increased risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, but only among people in the lowest socioeconomic position, according to a new research study published in PLOS Medicine by Eirik Degerud from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is there a nutritional advantage to fresh vs frozen fish? Well, that depends...
(Natural News) New research shows that frozen fish is just as good as fresh fish if properly prepared. According to an initiative by Trondheim, Norway-based research company SINTEF, the Norwegian Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), and the Icelandic research institute Matis, new methods of handling fish can make it fresh throughout the year.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Healthcare to parents of young terrorism survivors: a registry-based study in Norway - Haga JM, Thoresen S, Stene LE, Wentzel-Larsen T, Dyb G.
OBJECTIVES: To assess changes in parents' short-term and long-term primary and specialised healthcare consumption following a terrorist attack threatening the lives of their children. DESIGN: Registry-based study comparing parental healthcare servi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Poly-victimization in a Norwegian adolescent population: prevalence, social and psychological profile, and detrimental effects - Mossige S, Huang L.
This study focuses on poly-victimization, with the aim of providing a realistic estimation of the prevalence of lifetime victimization in a Norwegian adolescent population (ages 18-19 years). METHODS: Based upon the concept from previou... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The headache of terror: a matched cohort study of adolescents from the Ut øya and the HUNT Study - Stensland SØ, Zwart JA, Wentzel-Larsen T, Dyb G.
OBJECTIVE: To elaborate the risk of headache among adolescent survivors exposed to terror. METHODS: On July 22, 2011, a lone man opened gunfire, killing 69 people at a summer camp for adolescents on the Ut øya islet in Norway. All 358 adolescent su... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Consumer choices for the climate
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) The gift-giving season is upon us, and perhaps you're wondering how to give gifts that won't wreck the climate. Help is on the way. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists discover gut bacteria in bees spread antibiotic-resistant genes to each other
(Arizona State University) Researchers from Arizona State University and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences have discovered that antibiotic-resistant genes are spread in honey bee gut bacteria so that all strains of bacteria survive, rather than just one gut bacterium acquiring resistance and outcompeting others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

2017 Africa Report on Internal Displacement
Norwegian Refugee Council, Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre. 12/2017 This 56-page document, the second report on internal displacement in Africa, highlights the severity of the continent's continuing displacement crisis. It details new displacement associated with conflict and disasters in 2016, and provides new and compelling evidence for action. It calls for a new approach to displacement that addresses its causes and longer-term implications, as well as its immediate humanitarian consequences. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Another Legacy of Terror Attacks: Migraines
Norwegian researchers examined the aftermath of a 2011 terrorist attack on a summer camp in Norway that left 69 people dead and 33 severely wounded. Most of the dead were teenagers. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - December 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Witnessing Terror Event Can Lead to Daily Migraines (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Study done in young survivors of 2011 mass shooting in Norway (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - December 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Another Legacy of Terror Attacks: Migraines
WEDNESDAY, Dec. 13, 2017 -- Survivors of terror attacks may be at risk of developing frequent migraines or tension-type headaches, a new study suggests. Norwegian researchers examined the aftermath of a 2011 terrorist attack on a summer camp in... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 13, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

This Nobel Laureate Is Worried U.S. Politics Could Endanger Scientific Research
(STOCKHOLM) — An American researcher who shared this year’s Nobel Prize for medicine bluntly criticized political developments at home in his address at the awards’ gala banquet Sunday night. Michael Rosbash, who was honored for his work on circadian rhythms — commonly called the body clock — expressed concern that U.S. government support such as that received by him and colleagues Jeffrey Hall and Michael Young is endangered. “We benefited from an enlightened period in the postwar United States. Our National Institutes of Health have enthusiastically and generously supported basic resea...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: David Keyton and Jim Heintz / AP Tags: Uncategorized Budget Donald Trump Federal Budget Immigration micharl rosbash nobel prize onetime overnight politics Science United States Source Type: news

Nobel Laureate: As Long as Atomic Bombs Exist, Disaster Is Inevitable
(OSLO) — As long as atomic bombs exist, a disaster is inevitable, the head of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, the winner of this year’s Nobel Peace Prize, said Saturday. “We are facing a clear choice right now: The end of nuclear weapons or the end of us,” Beatrice Fihn told a news conference at the Norwegian Nobel Committee. “An impulsive tantrum, a calculated military escalation, a terrorist or cyberattack or a complete accident — we will see the use of nuclear weapons unless they are eliminated,” she warned. “These weapons do not make us safe, they a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: David Keyton / AP Tags: Uncategorized Nobel Peace Prize norway Nuclear Weapons onetime Source Type: news

"Maybe I will just send a quick text …" - an examination of drivers' distractions, causes, and potential interventions - Johansson OJ, Fyhri A.
Many people use cars all over the world. This is, however, not done without risk, as traffic accidents are one of the most common causes of death for adolescents worldwide. The number of deaths has steadily decreased, both worldwide and in Norway. Many of ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

US and Norwegian trials compare treatment options for opioid dependence
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) The current opioid epidemic is destroying lives, families, and communities. Medication is widely considered to be the most effective treatment, but far too few people who could benefit are actually treated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Checkup: Does an A.D.H.D. Link Mean Tylenol Is Unsafe in Pregnancy?
In a Norwegian study, pregnant women who took acetaminophen for 29 days or more had a more than twofold risk of having children with A.D.H.D. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PERRI KLASS, M.D. Tags: Pregnancy and Childbirth Women and Girls Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Fever Tylenol (Drug) Source Type: news

Developing EMS Quality Indicators in Nordic Countries
Measuring EMS quality in the Nordic countries Nordic Collaboration Editor's note: Although we usually present a single piece of research in this column, this month we instead present an important article on efforts to benchmark EMS quality in Nordic countries-Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Iceland. Prehospital services are in transition in the Nordic countries, with similar trends worldwide. Increase in population, longer life expectancy and a rapidly growing elderly population increase the need for healthcare, including EMS and out-of-hospital care. The percentage of growth in the number of calls to Norw...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Janne K. Kj øllesdal Tags: Operations Source Type: news

Developing EMS Quality Indicators in Nordic Countries
Measuring EMS quality in the Nordic countries Nordic Collaboration Editor's note: Although we usually present a single piece of research in this column, this month we instead present an important article on efforts to benchmark EMS quality in Nordic countries-Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Iceland. Prehospital services are in transition in the Nordic countries, with similar trends worldwide. Increase in population, longer life expectancy and a rapidly growing elderly population increase the need for healthcare, including EMS and out-of-hospital care. The percentage of growth in the number of calls to Norway's emergen...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Janne K. Kj øllesdal Tags: Operations Source Type: news

Does urbanization lead to less energy use on road transport? Evidence from municipalities in Norway - Liu Y, Huang L, Kaloudis A, St øre-Valen M.
The relationship between urbanization, energy use, and CO2 emissions has been extensively studied in recent years, however little attention paid to the differences in urban forms. Previous studies implicitly assume that the urban form is homogenous across ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Transportation Issues Source Type: news

Compensation after treatment for anterior cruciate ligament injuries: a review of compensation claims in Norway from 2005 to 2015 - Randsborg PH, Bukholm IRK, Jakobsen RB.
PURPOSE: To assess the most common reasons for complaints following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries reported to the Norwegian System of Patient Injury Compensation (NPE), and to view these complaints in light of the ACL reconstructions (ACL-Rs) r... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Public attitudes towards involuntary admission and treatment by mental health services in Norway - Joa I, Hustoft K, Anda LG, Br ønnick K, Nielssen O, Johannessen JO, Langeveld JH.
PURPOSE: The role of compulsory treatment of serious mental disorders has been the topic of ongoing public debate involving among others mental health professionals, service providers, service user advocates, relatives of service users, media commentators ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Meadows beat out shrubs when it comes to storing carbon
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) While the world focuses on controlling global warming caused by CO2 emissions from fossil fuels, less attention has been paid to the capacity of vegetation and soils to take up and store carbon. A remote field site in the Norwegian mountains is improving our understanding of carbon cycling in high-latitude alpine areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Metabolites altered in chronic kidney disease
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio) A new study that included researchers from Norway, the University of Washington, the University of California San Diego and The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (now called UT Health San Antonio ™ ) found that dozens of small molecules called metabolites are altered in this disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Feature Review: What factors influence the provision of care by skilled birth attendants in low- and middle-income countries?
New Cochrane evidence synthesis highlights the many factors that influence the care provided by skilled birth attendantsIn low- and middle-income countries, many mothers still die during childbirth. Women are encouraged to give birth in health facilities rather than at home so they can receive care from skilled birth attendants. A skilled birth attendant is a health worker such as a midwife, doctor, or nurse who is trained to manage a normal pregnancy and childbirth, and refer the mother and newborn when complications arise.A team of Cochrane authors based in Norway, South Africa,and Uganda worked withCochrane Effective Pr...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 21, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Featured Review: What factors influence the provision of care by skilled birth attendants in low- and middle-income countries?
New Cochrane evidence synthesis highlights the many factors that influence the care provided by skilled birth attendantsIn low- and middle-income countries, many mothers still die during childbirth. Women are encouraged to give birth in health facilities rather than at home so they can receive care from skilled birth attendants. A skilled birth attendant is a health worker such as a midwife, doctor, or nurse who is trained to manage a normal pregnancy and childbirth, and refer the mother and newborn when complications arise.A team of Cochrane authors based in Norway, South Africa,and Uganda worked withCochrane Effective Pr...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 21, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Opioid Addiction Treatments Face Off in US Trial
CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol worked about the same as an older treatment, Suboxone. Both drugs had high relapse rates and there were overdoses, including fatal ones, in the experiment in 570 adults. The study , published Tuesday in the journal Lancet, is the first to compare the two drugs in the United States, where an opioid addiction epidemic has do...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Opioid Addiction Treatments Face Off in US Trial
CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol worked about the same as an older treatment, Suboxone. Both drugs had high relapse rates and there were overdoses, including fatal ones, in the experiment in 570 adults. The study , published Tuesday in the journal Lancet, is the first to compare the two drugs in the United States, where an opioid addiction epidemic has do...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Opioid Addiction Treatments Face Off in US Trial
CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol worked about the same as an older treatment, Suboxone. Both drugs had high relapse rates and there were overdoses, including fatal ones, in the experiment in 570 adults. The study , published Tuesday in the journal Lancet, is the first to compare the two drugs in the United States, where an opioid addiction epidemic has do...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Ethiopia:AHRI's Rich Contribution to Ethiopia
[Ethiopian Herald] Dr. Tore Godal is an international Public Health Specialist currently working as a Special Adviser on global; health at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Norway. He was instrumental in the initiation of (1973-74) of the UNDP/World Bank, WHO special program for research and training in tropical diseases, leading the programs's pilot project and flagship efforts, immunology of leprosy. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 15, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

GBCA study contradicts past gadolinium retention results
In results they described as "unexpected" and "controversial," Norwegian researchers...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Norris lawsuit puts personal face on gadolinium debate Evidence mounts: Use macrocyclic GBCAs in pediatric MRI FDA panel votes to add retention warning to GBCA labels Study measures allergic event rates for gadolinium contrast Gadolinium found in animal tissue regardless of GBCA type (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 15, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Satellites could be launched from Shetland Islands' most nothern isle
Unst, which has a population of only 600, is identified in UK Space Agency research as best site in UK for spaceport to launch satellites into orbitFor the 600 residents of the most northern island in the Shetlands, it could be the most exciting thing since Unstfest – the annual shindig that this year offered, among its attractions, a scything demonstration over-16s could join.The proposals are at an early stage, but if the Shetland Space Centre Ltd gets its way,Unst could become the UK ’s premier spaceport with a local economy revitalised by blasting satellites into orbit. The company was set up on the island,...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Space Scotland Satellites Science UK news Source Type: news

Satellites could be launched from Shetland Islands' most northern isle
Unst, which has a population of only 600, is identified in UK Space Agency research as best site in UK for spaceport to launch satellites into orbitFor the 600 residents of the most northern island in the Shetlands, it could be the most exciting thing since Unstfest – the annual shindig that this year offered, among its attractions, a scything demonstration over-16s could join.The proposals are at an early stage, but if the Shetland Space Centre Ltd gets its way,Unst could become the UK ’s premier spaceport with a local economy revitalised by blasting satellites into orbit. The company was set up on the island,...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Space Scotland Satellites Science UK news Source Type: news

Carbon Pollution Levels Rose for the First Time in Four Years
(WASHINGTON) — Global carbon pollution rose this year after three straight years when levels of the heat-trapping gas didn’t go up at all, scientists reported Monday. Preliminary figures project that worldwide carbon dioxide emissions are up about 2 percent this year, according to an international team of scientists. Most of the increase came from China. The report by the Global Carbon Project team dashed hopes that emissions from the burning of coal, oil and gas had peaked. “We hoped that we had turned the corner… We haven’t,” said study co-author Rob Jackson, an Earth scientist at Sta...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

Families in Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) teams in Norway: a cross-sectional study on relatives' experiences of involvement and alienation - Weimand BM, Israel P, Ewertzon M.
International research shows that relatives of people with mental illness are rarely involved by mental health services. Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) has been recently implemented in Norway. The experience of relatives of ACT users is largely unknow... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Community-Based Prevention Source Type: news

Effects of a penalty point system on traffic violations - Sagberg F, Ingebrigtsen R.
We analysed data from the Norwegian driver's licence penalty point register over a three-year period, in order to investigate whether the number of incurred penalty points in a given time period can predict the probability of incurring additional points in... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Aid Groups Sound Alarm on DRC Crisis
By Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Nov 13 2017 (IPS)The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is on the brink of a humanitarian crisis and the international community must step in before it worsens, humanitarian agencies warn. The escalation of ethnic clashes in southeastern DRC in recent months has left millions displaced and on the verge of starvation.In the past year alone, the conflict has displaced nearly 2 million, 850,000 of whom are children and some of whom have fled to the neighboring nations of Angola and Zambia. DRC already had the highest number of new displacements in the world in 2016.Last month, the U...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Africa Aid Armed Conflicts Climate Change Crime & Justice Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Migration & Refugees Peace Religion TerraViva United Nations Water & Sanitation Source Type: news

Validating performance of TRISS, TARN and NORMIT survival prediction models in a Norwegian trauma population - Skaga NO, Eken T, S øvik S.
INTRODUCTION: Anatomic injury, physiological derangement, age, injury mechanism and pre-injury comorbidity are well-founded predictors of trauma outcome. Statistical prediction models may have poorer discrimination, calibration and accuracy when applied in... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

All forms of sexual harassment can cause psychological harm
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Even the least severe forms of sexual harassment can have serious consequences for high school students who are targeted. Girls struggle the most. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news