COVID-19 vaccines: Safety, side effects –– and coincidence
As the pandemic rages on, it’s increasingly clear that widespread vaccination is essential to help contain it. Physical distancing, universal face coverings, and frequent handwashing are effective, but not foolproof. And of course, these measures don’t work if they are not followed. So, the rapid development of mRNA vaccines and other vaccines to prevent COVID-19 is welcome — some say miraculous — news. But while many people are scrambling to get a vaccine, others are hesitating. Start here: Are these vaccines safe and effective? It’s natural to wonder if brand new vaccines against a novel cor...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Vaccines Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 8th 2021
This study was divided in two phases: CALERIE-1 and CALERIE-2. CALERIE-1 study was performed to assess the possible effects induced by a reduction of 10-30% of caloric intake on body composition parameters and lipid profile after 6 and 12 months in a population of middle-aged non-obese subjects. CALERIE-1 results showed an improvement in lipid and glycemic profile and a reduction in body weight (BW) and fat mass. CALERIE-2 was the largest multi-center study on CRD. A total of 220 subjects were enrolled randomly with a 2:1 allocation into two subgroups: 145 in the CRD group and 75 in the ad libitum group. The CRD gro...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 7, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Notes on European Longevity Industry Startups
While much of the longevity industry is based in the US, there are a fair number of companies elsewhere in the world, working on approaches that target the mechanisms of aging in order to better treat age-related conditions or improve health in later life. The article here notes some of the European biotech startups in the industry. The main body of commentary on the industry in this article suffers from much the same issues as most popular science coverage of research into the treatment of aging as a medical condition, in that the author makes no attempt to distinguish between parts of the field that cannot possible do mu...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 4, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Understanding Leprosy on World Leprosy Day
Leprosy is a chronic and progressive disease that primarily affects the skin and peripheral nervous system. Leprosy has been with us for thousands of years. There is evidence of the disease as far back as 4000 BC, in ancient Egypt.[1] In 1873, Norwegian physician Dr. Gerhard Armauer Hansen discovered that leprosy was caused by a bacterium. [2] Today, we call this bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, and we often refer to leprosy as Hansen’s Disease, in honor of Dr. Hansen. While leprosy caused significant morbidity and mortality in the past, cases today are rare and are curable with proper treatment. How Is Leprosy Transm...
Source: GIDEON blog - January 28, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Uri Blackman Tags: News Leprosy Source Type: blogs

All you need to know about waterborne diseases
  Waterborne diseases are contracted through exposure to contaminated water including drinking water, water used in food preparation, and swimming water.  They can be caused by bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Below is a partial list of waterborne disease pathogens, their microbial classification, and their resulting illnesses. Classification Microorganism Disease Bacterium Campylobacter spp. Campylobacteriosis Bacterium Escherichia coli E. Coli Diarrhea Bacterium Legionella pneumophila Legionnaires’ Disease Bacterium Salmonella enterica Salmonellosis Bacterium Salmonella typhi Typhoid fev...
Source: GIDEON blog - January 14, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Microbiology News Tips Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 11th 2021
This study demonstrates the potential of a natural (o-Vanillin) and a synthetic (RG-7112) senolytic compounds to remove senescent IVD cells, decrease SASP factors release, reduce the inflammatory environment and enhance the IVD matrix production. Removal of senescent cells, using senolytics drugs, could lead to improved therapeutic interventions and ultimately decrease pain and a provide a better quality of life of patients living with intervertebral disc degeneration and low back pain. From Ying Ann Chiao of Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation: Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in aging and cardiovasc...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 10, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Report from the 7th Annual Aging Research and Drug Discovery (ARDD) Meeting
Most 2020 conferences were held online as a result of COVID-19, curtailing the networking, discovery, and serendipitous discussion that is most of the point of attending a conference. Presentations were still given and research results announced, however. It remains useful to glance over conference reports for a sense of the mood and focus of the academic research and clinical development communities. A tremendous growth in the proportion of elderly people raises a range of challenges to societies worldwide. Healthy aging should therefore be a main priority for all countries across the globe. However, science behi...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 6, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Healthcare for visitors to the UK from the EU
Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) - This guidance provides information on accessing healthcare for visitors to the UK from EU countries, Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Switzerland.Guidance  (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - January 4, 2021 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Brexit Source Type: blogs

Goin ’ Greyhound – Travels in Australia
Goin’ Greyhound by Dave Bradley (Kindle/eReader version here) Jaden leapt from the Greyhound into fetid coach-stop air that felt as heavy as a steam room but without the scent of eucalytpus oil despite this being the Northern Territory. He dashed to the gents and en route doused his ready-pasted toothbrush in tepid water from the nearest tap, and shuffled into a gap at the rankest-smelling trough for a well-earned pee, chewing on the toothbrush as he went. “You must be German,” a fellow backpacker one splash along asserted, “only a German would urinate and clean their teeth at the same time.” ...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - December 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Goin ’ Greyhound
Goin’ Greyhound by Dave Bradley (Kindle/eReader version here) Jaden leapt from the Greyhound into a Turkish bath, doused his toothbrush in tepid water from the nearest tap, and shuffled into place at the rankest smelling trough for a well-earned pee, chewing on the toothbrush as he went. “You must be German,” a fellow backpacker one splash along asserted, “only a German would urinate and clean their teeth at the same time.” The accent was Scandi…Norwegian perhaps. “Gngnsh,” chewed Jaden. “Aah, British, yes, a Brit would probably do that too.” It was the briefest ...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - December 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Income-related inequalities in affordability and access to primary care in eleven high-income countries
The Commonwealth Fund - To compare the health experiences of adults with lower income during the pandemic and the effect of income-related disparities, the Commonwealth Fund surveyed adults across 11 high-income countries: Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the U.S. In nearly all countries, adults with lower income were significantly more likely than those with higher income to have multiple chronic health conditions.Report (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - December 15, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Covid-19 Public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Standing Together on NATO's North Flank: UK-Norwegian Defence Cooperation
The UK and Norway share a long and close history, bound by shared experiences as seafaring nations whose political, cultural, and economic development have been shaped in part by their exploitation of the North Sea and North Atlantic. Much could remain to be gained from continuing to deepen and evolve their longstanding partnership to meet the new challenges of the 21st century. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - December 9, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Anna Knack; James Black; Ruth Harris Source Type: blogs

Some Perspective on China and “Rare Earth” Minerals
Scott LincicomeFor morethan a decade now, Chinese production and processing of " rare earth " minerals -- critical inputs in many high-tech products -- has raised concerns among U.S. policymakers about the economic and national security risks arising from potential American " dependence " on China for these goods. Though the specific minerals at issue change from year-to-year, the concerns remain the same, as do domestic producers'use of the "China Threat" to seek financial and other support from the federal government. Today, the mineral is cobalt, Chinese control of which, according to a new...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 3, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Scott Lincicome Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: My Letter to BMJ Paediatrics Open about the CBT-Music Therapy Study
This study was published in April by BMJ […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - November 25, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized BMJ music therapy norway Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Update on BMJ ’ s CBT-Music Therapy Study (h/t Steinkopf and Tack)
By David Tuller, DrPH I have written multiple posts this year about a Norwegian study of cognitive behavior therapy plus music therapy as a treatment for chronic fatigue after acute EBV infection (aka mononucleosis and glandular fever). The study, published in April by BMJ Paediatrics Open, was rife with methodological and ethical flaws. It should not have […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - November 24, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized BMJ CBT music therapy Nina Steinkopf norway Tack Source Type: blogs

Therapist or Patient: Who ’ s in Charge?
Let’s talk about psychotherapy. Why hasn’t it changed much in the last century? And if a patient isn’t getting well, is it the fault of the patient, the therapist or the therapy itself? In today’s podcast, Gabe and psychologist Barry L. Duncan discuss the idea of holding therapists more accountable when the patient isn’t getting better. Join us for a great discussion that sheds new light on how we should be treating mental health issues. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW   Guest information for ‘Barry L. Duncan- Therapist or Patient’ Podcast Episode Barry L. Duncan, Psy.D. . is CEO ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Psychotherapy The Psych Central Show Treatment Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: BMJ Retracts Music Therapy-CBT Study, But …
By David Tuller, DrPH *October is crowdfunding month at Berkeley. I conduct this project as a senior fellow in public health and journalism and the university’s Center for Global Public Health. If you would like to support the project, here’s the place: https://crowdfund.berkeley.edu/project/22602 I have written many posts this year about a Norwegian study of cognitive […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - October 27, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized BMJ CBT music therapy study norway Source Type: blogs

Fascinating case of dynamic shark fin morphology - what is going on?
 Case submitted by Magnus Nossen MD from Norway, written by Pendell MeyersA man in his 50s with no pertinent medical history suffered a witnessed cardiac arrest. EMS found the patient in VFib and performed ACLS for 26 minutes then obtained ROSC. 12 minutes later, the patient went back into VFib arrest and underwent another 15 minutes of resuscitation followed by successful defibrillation and sustained ROSC. In total, he received approximately 40 minutes of CPR and 7 defibrillation attempts. Here is his first ECG recorded after stable ROSC:Originally recorded in 50 mm/s (the standard in Norway), here converted to ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - October 26, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 19th 2020
In conclusion, we found that regardless of the presence of multimorbidity, engaging in a healthier lifestyle was associated with up to 6.3 years longer life for men and 7.6 years for women; however, not all lifestyle risk factors equally correlated with life expectancy, with smoking being significantly worse than others. A Hydrogel Scaffold to Encourage Peripheral Nerve Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/10/a-hydrogel-scaffold-to-encourage-peripheral-nerve-regeneration/ The nervous system of mammals is poorly regenerative at best. The use of implantable scaffold materials is one of the...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 18, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Evidence for High Intensity Interval Training to be More Beneficial than Moderate Exercise in the Elderly
Researchers here report on the results five years in to a study comparing the effects of different exercise programs on mortality in older people. While the high intensity interval training group are clearly doing well in comparison to their peers, there is a cautionary tale in study design for the other two groups, in that the control individuals appear to have been inspired by their inclusion in the study to exercise more than the study participants who were assigned to the moderate intensity training group. Taken as a whole, the results nonetheless provide yet more corroborating evidence for exercise to reduce mortality...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 15, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

How feeling awe in nature can spur mental well-being and personal growth
You might enjoy skiing or hiking. But do you feel at home in the mountains? Do you feel connected to the wilderness? According to a new study, that sense of being “home” in nature could be linked to your life satisfaction and personal growth, at least for young people. Another new study of older people finds that a connection to nature seems to make them happier and more willing to help others. In the first study, a team of researchers in Norway followed a group of college students who were training to lead wilderness expeditions in one of two settings: either in a forest in the middle of a storm or across a hi...
Source: SharpBrains - October 12, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Peak Performance awe Brain Teasers brain-teaser mental health mental well being nature personal growth well-being wilderness Source Type: blogs

Conspiracy Theories And Winter Wellbeing: The Week ’s Best Psychology Links
Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web Displaying empathy towards others seems like an obvious virtue — but it can have a dark side, writes Richard Fisher at BBC Future. Empathising with a single, identifiable individual can divert time and money away from causes that could benefit many more people, for instance. And bad actors can harness our tendency to empathise with those who are similar to us in order to get us to act aggressively towards the out-group. We often think of punishment as a tool to exact revenge on those who have wronged us. But this can’t be ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Weekly links Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: The Lightning Process Strikes Again
By David Tuller, DrPH The Lightning Process was founded more than two decades ago by Phil Parker, a British Tarot reader and specialist in auras and spiritual guides. The LP, as it is often called, could be described as “a neuro-physiological training programme based on self-coaching, concepts from Positive Psychology, Osteopathy and Neuro Linguistic Programming,” […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - August 27, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: David Tuller ME/CFS Crawley Lightning Process norway phil parker Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Columbia Experts Urge BMJ to Retract Not-Fully-Reviewed Study
By David Tuller, DrPH On Thursday, Professors Vincent Racaniello and Mady Hornig, both from Columbia University, wrote to BMJ’s research integrity coordinator. I have been corresponding with BMJ, and specifically the research integrity coordinator, about the Norwegian study of cognitive behavior therapy combined with music therapy as a treatment for chronic fatigue in adolescents after […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 25, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized BMJ CBT mononucleosis music therapy norway Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Columbia Experts Urge BMJ to Retract Problem-Plagued Study
By David Tuller, DrPH On Thursday, Professors Vincent Racaniello and Mady Hornig, both from Columbia University, wrote to BMJ’s research integrity coordinator. I have been corresponding with BMJ, and specifically the research integrity coordinator, about the Norwegian study of cognitive behavior therapy combined with music therapy as a treatment for chronic fatigue in adolescents after […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 25, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized BMJ CBT mononucleosis music therapy norway Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Another Letter About BMJ ’ s Music Therapy Study
By David Tuller, DrPH I am still waiting for answers from BMJ about the Norwegian study of cognitive behavior therapy plus music therapy for treatment of chronic fatigue in adolescents after mononucleosis. The study was published in BMJ Paediatrics Open. I have written about it here. This morning I sent the following letter to the […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 21, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: David Tuller ME/CFS BMJ CBT music therapy norway Source Type: blogs

COVID-19:  Too Much Time to Think
Slights, mistakes, embarrassments, accidents, catastrophes. Are these things flooding your mind? Is your self-esteem in the toilet? Have you stopped to ask yourself why? Here’s the reason — COVID-19 is doing a number on our brain. Pre-COVID, we had a million distractions. It was safe to roam the earth. You could go to a store for a little shopping without fearing for your life. You could venture out to a restaurant and have a meal cooked for you. Heck, you could even take your kid to a drama class, which is now being taught via ZOOM meetings. Since March of 2020, there are just fewer things to do to take out mi...
Source: World of Psychology - July 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura Yeager Tags: Personal Self-Esteem Self-Help Boredom coronavirus COVID-19 Embarrassment Memory pandemic quarantine Shame social distancing Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Nudge for BMJ About Music Therapy; Letter to “ Health Anxiety ” Expert
By David Tuller, DrPH I have written two more letters and have posted them below. The first letter is a nudge to BMJ’s research integrity department, which missed a deadline this week for providing me with an update on the status of that music therapy study from Norway. You know, the one that started off […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 3, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized CBT health anxiety jo daniels music therapy Source Type: blogs

Models of Social Interaction Do Not Reflect Current Social Life  
Are you secretly dreading the day when social distancing is just a vague memory? When you once again have to physically interact with other people, whether you like them or not? Chances are you are not a social deviant or a freak, but a representative of the new normal.  It’s Time to Rethink “Normal” The long-established preference for, and mastering of, face-to-face interaction with other people is considered tantamount to a high level of social functioning. Conversely, the image of a person with low social functioning is one who avoids physical contact, peering out at the real world through a (digi...
Source: World of Psychology - June 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Communication Family Friends General Psychology Relationships Research coronavirus COVID-19 extravesion Introversion Social Behavior social distancing social life Social Psychology Socialization Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 22nd 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 21, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: BMJ Responds to Appeals About Norway ’ s CBT-Music Therapy Study
By David Tuller, DrPH Earlier this week, I sent a nudge to Professor Imti Choonara, editor-in-chief of BMJ Paediatrics Open, and Fiona Godlee, editorial director of BMJ, about a problematic “feasibility study” published a few months ago. That followed a letter two weeks ago, to which I had not received a response. Previous posts on […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - June 18, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized BMJ CBT Fiona Godlee music therapy norway wyller Source Type: blogs

Quantifying Loss of Kidney Function with Age in a Human Population
Kidney function is critical to health, but, as is the case for all organs, the kidneys declines with age. The damage of aging produces harmful outcomes in many ways. For example, hypertension causes structural pressure damage in sensitive tissues in the kidneys. Further, senescent cells and other sources of chronic inflammation disrupt normal tissue maintenance processes in the kidneys, leading to the scar-like collagen deposits of fibrosis. In turn, loss of kidney function accelerates many other aspects of aging, including neurodegeneration and the onset of cognitive decline. An international study that has been ...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 16, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: A Letter to KCL, Another Letter to BMJ
By David Tuller, DrPH Last week, I wrote about a troubling press release issued by King’s College London regarding a major study of cognitive behavioural therapy as a treatment for so-called dissociative seizures. On Friday, I sent a letter to the two communications people listed on the press release about the study, as well as […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - June 15, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized BMJ CBT Fiona Godlee music therapy norway Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: A Response from Dagbladet
The Norwegian tabloid Dagbladet, taking a page from prestigious UK news organizations, has recently published a series of articles portraying ME patients as anti-scientific and belligerent. As I noted in a letter to Dagbladet two weeks ago, the journalist also misrepresented my academic and professional credentials. Since I didn’t hear back, I recently posted both […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - June 3, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Dagbladet Lightning Process norway Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Letter to BMJ Paediatrics Open About that CBT-Music Therapy Study
UPDATE: I sent the following correction to Dr Choonara shortly after sending the letter of concern. Dear Dr Choonara: I wanted to make a slight correction in point #3 below. The first sentence should have read: “Why was the outcome of recovery not mentioned in the trial registration and statistical analysis plan yet still highlighted […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 31, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized BMJ music therapy norway Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Two Letters to Dagbladet About Its ME Coverage
In recent weeks, the Norwegian tabloid Dagbladet has published a series of articles about ME, which it also calls CFS/ME. These articles have promoted the use of the Lightning Process as an intervention, criticized patients and the Norwegian ME Association for expressing opinions about the Lightning Process and cognitive behavior therapy, and engaged in multiple […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 30, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Lightning Process norway Source Type: blogs

Trial by Error: Tack ’ s Take on BMJ ’ s CBT-Music Therapy “ Feasibility Study ”
I have always made it clear that I pay attention when smart patients assess bad research. That’s how I stumbled into this whole mess in the first place–by reading what patients were writing about the PACE trial. (In that case, I at first dismissed the concerns when I read about how participants could get worse […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 28, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized BMJ CBT norway Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: My Letter to Senior Author of Norway ’ s CBT-Music Therapy Study
By David Tuller, DrPH In the past week, I have written three posts about a Norwegian study of cognitive behavior therapy plus music therapy for adolescents with chronic fatigue after acute Epstein-Barr virus infection–an illness known as mononucleosis in the US and glandular fever in the UK. The corresponding author of the study is Vegard […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 22, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Norway ’ s Double Whammy of Fuzzy Science
By David Tuller, DrPH Norway’s got a double whammy going on. First there’s the group of investigators that seems to have had trouble determining whether their newly published research on CBT and music therapy was an actual randomized trial or merely a feasibility study. (More on that below.) Then we have Dagbladet, a widely read […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 20, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: David Tuller ME/CFS Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: More Strangeness with that Norwegian CBT/Music Therapy Study
By David Tuller, DrPH In a well-designed clinical trial, the protocol, the registration and the statistical analysis plan should complement and not contradict each other. Investigators spend huge amounts of time developing clinical trial protocols. These are road-maps to the project, complete with (hopefully) well thought-out and clearly defined primary and secondary outcomes. These documents have […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 18, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: More on that Norwegian CBT/Music Therapy Study
By David Tuller, DrPH After the debacle with the Lightning Process study, you would think that BMJ would have learned an important lesson—editors and peer-reviewers should scrutinize the background materials for the trials they publish. That’s the best way to prevent selective outcome reporting and ensure that findings are reported as described in the trial […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 16, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Keep Petri Dishes in the Lab
By KIM BELLARD COVID-19 is changing the landscape of our healthcare system, and, indeed, of our entire society, in ways that we hadn’t been prepared for and with implications that we won’t fully grasp for some time.  As we grapple with how to reshape our healthcare system and our society in the wake of the pandemic, though, I worry we’re going to focus on the wrong problems.   Take, for example, nursing homes, prisons, and the meatpacking industry.   Anyone who has been paying attention to the pandemic will recognize that each of these have been “hot spots,&rdq...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Kim Bellard Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 and Fame
Ask anybody on the planet, “What do Tom Hanks, Boris Johnson, and Prince Charles have in common?” and they will instantly shout – “Corona.” Ask these same people, “Who were the three Prime Ministers that died of Coronavirus last month?” Few will respond, “Well…there was Nur Hassan Husein from Somalia, Mahmoud Jabril from Libya and Joachim Yhombi-Opango from Congo – who died (respectively) in London, Cairo, and Paris.” As of May 4, no fewer than eleven movie stars had contracted COVID-19, nine with fatal results. Other victims include retired Commanders of ...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 4, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Cases Events VIPatients Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Norway ’ s Proposed Lightning Process Trial
By David Tuller, DrPH Last year, Archives of Disease in Childhood slapped a 3000-word correction on a University of Bristol study of the Lightning Process. The lead investigator was Bristol’s ethically and methodologically challenged pediatrician, Professor Esther Crawley, who failed to disclose to the journal that the study had violated core scientific principles. As I […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 3, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

---
U.S. policymakers and health care leaders are looking for effective strategies to curtail the COVID-19 pandemic; they may well learn from innovative strategies used in other countries. Working this year in the United States as Commonwealth Fund Harkness Fellows, we have tracked the response efforts in our home countries of Canada, France, the Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom while watching the pandemic unfold in the U.S. In this post, we share some of these strategies.         (Source: The Commonwealth Fund: Blog)
Source: The Commonwealth Fund: Blog - May 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Umar Ikram, Christer Mj åset, M.D., Anne-Marie Boxall, Mylaine Breton, Ines Gravey, Holly Krelle, Véronique Raimond, Reginald D. Williams II Source Type: blogs

Keeping Kids Healthy in the Age of Coronavirus: Dr. Greene on The People ’ s Pharmacy
Transcript [00:00:00] Joe Graedon: I’m Joe Graedon. [00:00:01] Terry Graedon: And I’m Terry Graedon. Welcome to this podcast of the People’s Pharmacy. [00:00:06] Joe Graedon: You can find previous podcasts and more information on a range of health topics at PeoplesPharmacy.com.  [00:00:14] How’s your family holding up during the coronavirus pandemic? Isolation can be especially challenging for children. [00:00:22] This is the People’s Pharmacy with Terry and Joe Graedon. [00:00:33] Terry Graedon:  Children appear less susceptible than older adults to serious complications of COVID-19...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - April 21, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Alan Greene MD Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog COVID COVID-19 Viral Infection Source Type: blogs

How Norway's Allies View Its Defense Challenges and Opportunities
Norway's Ministry of Defence will shortly publish its next Long Term Plan, which outlines how the Armed Forces, in tandem with other elements of government and society, can best address the threats to Norway. Other countries can learn from how Norway chooses to tackle emerging challenges, and can benefit from its lessons learned. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - April 15, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Stephen J. Flanagan; James Black Source Type: blogs

Dreams Aren ’t Just Visual: We Often Hear Voices And Other Sounds Too
By Emma Young “At least since the philosophers of ancient Greece, scholars have pointed out the analogy between madness (psychosis) and dreaming…” So begins a new paper, published in PLoS One, that seems to shore up that analogy. Dreams and psychotic hallucinations do have things in common. They both feature perceptual sensations that seem real, but which are conjured up by our brains. However, there are also differences. While dreams are known to be highly visual, psychotic hallucinations are primarily auditory. They generally involve hearing things that aren’t real rather than seeing things ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Perception Psychosis Sleep and dreaming Source Type: blogs

The Elephant and the Virus
With respect to the coronavirus pandemic, I am concerned about India. Given their population density and more than 1.3 billion residents, the virus situation there could soon make what’s happening in Italy and Spain look tame. Earlier this week India was reporting only 129 infections and 2 deaths. Today it’s at 249 cases and 5 deaths. While those numbers may seem ridiculously low relative to India’s population, they appear to be starting out much the same as any other country. While mathematical illiterates might dismiss these numbers as trivial, fortunately India’s Prime Minister and their Na...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - March 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Steve Pavlina Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

The Cruise Industry Assistance Washington Should Give: Repeal the Passenger Vessel Services Act
Colin GrabowAs the coronavirus produces gaping holes in the balance sheets of companies throughout the economy, President Trumphasgivennumerousindications that he considers the cruise industry a  prime candidate for a federal bailout. With many of the world’s major cruise lines headquartered in electorally‐​important Florida, that’s not a surprise.But before appropriating a  single dollar of taxpayer money to these cruise lines, Congress and the White House should opt for another form of relief: repeal of the Passenger Vessel Services Act (PVSA). Passed in 1886, the law mandates that ves...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 19, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Colin Grabow Source Type: blogs