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High-capacity nanoparticle holds potential for targeted cancer therapies

Image: Jeremiah Johnson Chemists from the Mass. Institute of Technology developed a nanoparticle that they can pack with 3 or more drugs to create custom combination therapies for cancer, according to a study published this week in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. The team also revealed that cisplatin, a powerful anti-cancer drug, doesn’t work using the same DNA-damaging mechanism when delivered via nanoparticle compared to traditional methods. The team uses a unique nanoparticle production method, which they 1st reported in 2014. Instead of trying to load the drugs onto nanoparticles that are already built, they create the nanoparticles from building blocks already containing the drugs. This gives them more precise control over the structure of the nanoparticle and the dosage of each drug, they argue. “We can take any drug, as long as it has a functional group [a group of atoms that allows a molecule to participate in chemical reactions], and we can load it into our particles in exactly the ratio that we want, and have it release under exactly the conditions that we want it to,” senior author Jeremiah Johnson explained to MIT News. “It’s very modular.” The researchers delivered doses of 3 different cancer-fighting drugs – cisplatin, doxorubicin and camptothecin – to mice and observed that ovarian tumors shrank among mice that received treatment. The team also found that survival rates were higher for treated mice t...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Oncology Research & Development Mass. Institute of Technology Source Type: news

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Scientists at the Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center (VIC) at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered a novel, two-agent immunotherapy combination that worked surprisingly well in animal models with malignant mesothelioma. The discovery has sparked new optimism for immunotherapy, which has struggled to provide consistently positive results with aggressive cancers such as mesothelioma. “This is the beginning of a new story of hope, a new combination of immunotherapy,” Dr. Mark Poznansky, director of the VIC and associate professor at Harvard Medical School, told Asbestos.com. “It worked quite well in a...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Authors: Skoda AM, Simovic D, Karin V, Kardum V, Vranic S, Serman L Abstract The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway was first identified in the common fruit fly. It is a highly conserved evolutionary pathway of signal transmission from the cell membrane to the nucleus. The Hh signaling pathway plays an important role in the embryonic development. It exerts its biological effects through a signaling cascade that culminates in a change of balance between activator and repressor forms of glioma-associated oncogene (Gli) transcription factors. The components of the Hh signaling pathway involved in the signaling transfer t...
Source: Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences - Category: General Medicine Tags: Bosn J Basic Med Sci Source Type: research
In this study, we tested the binding of radiolabeled mAb 376.96 to human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells and localization in xenografts in immune-deficient mice and evaluated 212Pb-labeled 376.96 (212Pb-376 .96) for PDAC therapy.
Source: Nuclear Medicine and Biology - Category: Nuclear Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Safdar MH, Hussain Z, Abourehab MAS, Hasan H, Afzal S, Thu HE Abstract This review aims to overview and critically analyses recent developments in achieving tumour-specific delivery of anticancer agents, maximizing anticancer efficacy, and mitigating tumour progression and off-target effects. Stemming from critical needs to develop target-specific delivery vehicles in cancer therapy, various hyaluronic acid (HA)-conjugated nanomedicines have been fabricated owing to their biocompatibility, safety, tumour-specific targetability of drugs and genes, and proficient interaction with cluster-determinant-44 (CD44...
Source: Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology - Category: Biotechnology Tags: Artif Cells Nanomed Biotechnol Source Type: research
Shares in Novocure (NSDQ:NVCR) are on the rise today after the medical device maker topped revenue and losses-per-share expectations on Wall Street with its 3rd quarter earnings results. The St. Helier, N.J.-based company posted losses of $11.5 million, or 13¢ per share, on sales of $50.1 million for the 3 months ended September 30, seeing losses on the bottom-line shrink 65.8% while sales grew 131.2% compared with the same period during the previous fiscal year. Losses per share for the quarter came in under the 17¢ consensus on Wall Street, while sales beat the $43.6 million expectations on The Street. &ld...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business/Financial News MassDevice Earnings Roundup NovoCure Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: ROR1 is a promising immunotherapeutic target in many epithelial tumors, however high cell-surface ROR1 expression in multiple normal tissues raises concerns for on-target off-tumor toxicities. Clinical translation of ROR1 targeted therapies warrants careful monitoring of toxicities to normal organs, and may require strategies to ensure patient safety. PMID: 27852699 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Cancer Res Source Type: research
Abstract Given that most malignant tumors are derived from epithelium, developing a strategy for treatment of epithelium-derived cancers (i.e., carcinomas) is a pivotal issue in cancer therapy. Carcinomas, including ovarian, breast, prostate, and pancreatic cancers, are known to overexpress various claudins (CLDNs); in particular, CLDN-3 and -4 are frequently overexpressed in malignant case. The generation of CLDN binders is a key for expanding CLDN-targeted cancer therapy but has been delayed due to the small size of CLDN extracellular domains (approximately 50 amino acids for the first domain and 15 amino acids ...
Source: Pflugers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology - Category: Physiology Authors: Tags: Pflugers Arch Source Type: research
uch H Abstract Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-related 7 (TRPM7) is a non-selective cation channel fused with a functional kinase domain. Physiologically, TRPM7 channel is involved in magnesium homeostasis, cell survival and gastrulation. The channel part is responsible for calcium, magnesium, and metal trace entries. Cation current through TRPM7 channel is inhibited by both intracellular magnesium and magnesium complexed with nucleotides. In parallel, the kinase is able to phosphorylate cytoskeleton proteins like myosin chain regulating cell tension and motility. Moreover, TRPM7 kinase domain can be cleav...
Source: Current Medicinal Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Curr Med Chem Source Type: research
Molecular Pathways: The Balance between Cancer and the Immune System Challenges the Therapeutic Specificity of Targeting Nuclear Factor-κB Signaling for Cancer Treatment. Clin Cancer Res. 2016 Jul 15; Authors: Zeligs KP, Neuman MK, Annunziata CM Abstract The Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway is a complex network linking extracellular stimuli to cell survival and proliferation. Cytoplasmic signaling to activate NF-kB can occur as part of the DNA damage response or in response to a large variety of activators including viruses, inflammation, and cell death. NF-κB transc...
Source: Clinical Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Cancer Res Source Type: research
Conclusion Much of modern cancer treatment is aimed at finding the right treatment for the right person, and this type of genetic research may help doctors to target treatments at the people who are most likely to benefit from them. It's not news that mutations in DNA repair genes like BRCA2 are linked to an increased risk of prostate cancer, although we are still some way from understanding how that link works. But the finding that these mutations seem to be much more common in men whose cancer has spread around the body is interesting. Doctors have long wanted a test that could identify which prostate cancers are more ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news
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