Hope for Broken Hearts
Biolife4D has achieved a milestone in its ultimate quest to develop human organs for transplant. The company recently announced that it has developed a cardiac patch using a highly specialized 3D printer designed to protect living cells during the printing process. The patch is designed to help patients recover heart function after an acute myocardial infarction, said Ravi Birla, PhD, the company’s chief science officer, in an interview with MD+DI. “Over several weeks, acute myocardial infarction results in scar formation and progresses to chronic heart failure, severely damp...
Source: MDDI - October 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Susan Shepard Tags: 3-D Printing Source Type: news

Amgen Invests £50 Million ($66 Million) In Oxford Nanopore Technologies
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. and OXFORD, England, Oct. 18, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) and Oxford Nanopore Technologies Ltd. today announced Amgen's equity investment of £50 million ($66 million) in Oxford Nanopore, a privately-owned, UK-based company advancing a new generation of portable, real-time genetic sequencing technology. Oxford Nanopore has developed and brought to market a proprietary sequencing technology that uses many nanopores (nano-scale holes made by proteins contained within a synthetic membrane) in combination with electronics to perform direct, real-time sequencing of DNA and RNA. The...
Source: Amgen News Release - October 18, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Chiral Lewis acids integrated with single-walled carbon nanotubes for asymmetric catalysis in water
The development of highly reactive and stereoselective catalytic systems is required not only to improve existing synthetic methods but also to invent distinct chemical reactions. Herein, a homogenized combination of nickel-based Lewis acid–surfactant-combined catalysts and single-walled carbon nanotubes is shown to exhibit substantial activity in water. In addition to the enhanced reactivity, stereoselective performance and long-term stability were demonstrated in asymmetric conjugate addition reactions of aldoximes to furnish chiral nitrones in high yields with excellent selectivities. The practical and straightfor...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kitanosono, T., Xu, P., Kobayashi, S. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Carbon nanotubes help nickel work in water
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Hyperfine interaction of individual atoms on a surface
Taking advantage of nuclear spins for electronic structure analysis, magnetic resonance imaging, and quantum devices hinges on knowledge and control of the surrounding atomic-scale environment. We measured and manipulated the hyperfine interaction of individual iron and titanium atoms placed on a magnesium oxide surface by using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy in combination with single-atom electron spin resonance. Using atom manipulation to move single atoms, we found that the hyperfine interaction strongly depended on the binding configuration of the atom. We could extract atom- and position-dependent infor...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Willke, P., Bae, Y., Yang, K., Lado, J. L., Ferron, A., Choi, T., Ardavan, A., Fernandez-Rossier, J., Heinrich, A. J., Lutz, C. P. Tags: Physics reports Source Type: news

Nanobiotix reels in $18.5m tranche from European Investment Bank
Nanobiotix (PAR:NANO.PA) received €16 million ($18.5 million) in the first tranche of a previously-announced non-dilutive loan from the European Investment Bank. The five-year funding deal is designed to support the company’s development of nanoparticle-based cancer therapies. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Nanobiotix reels in $18.5m tranche from European Investment Bank appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - October 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Funding Roundup Oncology Pharmaceuticals Wall Street Beat nanobiotix Source Type: news

Good for the lungs, too: Resveratrol found to reduce pulmonary toxicity
(Natural News) A natural substance-turned-supplement can help protect your lungs from toxic nanoparticles generated by industrial air pollution. Taiwanese researchers reported that resveratrol can reduce the toxic effect of carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) on the lungs. Nanoparticles are tiny particles that are measured in terms of nanometers. Synthetic ones are used in all kinds of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nano composite inventor enters the Inventors Hall of Fame
2 0 1 8 N AT I O N A L I N V E N T O R S HALL OF FAME INDUCTEE Sumita Mitra BORN FEBRUARY 27, 1949 Sumita Mitra ’s dental innovations capture the importance of strength and the elegance of beauty, allowing her to solve ongoing issues plaguing both dental patients and professionals. By revolutionizing the field of dentistry with her invention of the first nanocomposite dental materials, she made the developm ent and commercialization of many dental products possible. Mitra’s invention of Filtek™ Supreme Universal Restorative improved upon previous dental composites by providing superior optical properties ...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - October 16, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Public opinion on GMOs might impact similar technologies in stores
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that an individual's perception of genetically modified organisms might impact their judgments about whether or not nanotechnology-enabled products should be labeled in stores. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA awarded US/international patents on material that attacks multiple cancers
(University of Texas at Arlington) The University of Texas at Arlington has been awarded U.S. and international patents on a nanoparticle material that can be activated by light, microwave, X-ray, or ultrasound to kill multiple kinds of cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Combined with BONCAT, Nanomedical Diagnostics Graphene Biosensor...
In this publication, the Keck Graduate Institute (KGI) at Claremont Colleges uses the Agile R100 graphene biosensor to develop a lab-on-a-chip with reduced sample size, complexity, cost, and time.(PRWeb October 16, 2018)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/combined_with_boncat_nanomedical_diagnostics_graphene_biosensor_identifies_circulating_biomarkers_of_aging/prweb15838387.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - October 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Nanotechnology: the future of fire safety - Olawoyin R.
This study reviews fire protection developments and explores the applicability of nanotechnology for mitigating emerging issues. There are many types of fire retardant materials that can mitigate damage and compartmentalize fire, but nanotechnology has bee... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Big award enables study of small surfaces
(Rice University) Rice chemist Matt Jones is one of 18 scientists to receive the Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering this year. Jones will use Rice's advanced transmission electron microscope to study the dynamics of chemical processes at the nanoscale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global Health: Tiny Nanoparticles to Treat a Huge Problem: Snakebites
Snakes kill or cripple 500,000 people a year, but antivenins are costly and rare in poor countries. Now scientists are testing injectable nanoparticles that neutralize venom. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Nanotechnology Snakes Tissue (Human) Emergency Medical Treatment Poisoning and Poisons Third World and Developing Countries PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases (Journal) University of California, Irvine Source Type: news

FDA: TearLab ’ s Discovery MMP-9 test 510(k) fails to meet substantial equivalence
TearLab Corp. (OTC:TEAR) said this week that the FDA ruled that the company’s 510(k) submission for its TearLab Discovery MMP-9 test, designed to measure an inflammatory biomarker found in tears, did not meet criteria for substantial equivalence. The San Diego-based company’s TearLab Discovery lab-on-a-chip platform is intended to analyze multiple biomarkers in human tears with nanoliter volume tear collection. The MMP-9 test is intended to aid in the diagnosis of dry eye disease, the company added. Read the whole story on our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News  The post FDA: TearLab’s Dis...
Source: Mass Device - October 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: 510(k) Clinical Trials Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Tearlab Corp. Source Type: news

Pulse Biosciences launches NPS cutaneous wart feasibility study
Pulse Biosciences (NSDQ:PLSE) said today that it launched a clinical feasibility study of its Nano-Pulse Stimulation platform intended to treat cutaneous warts. The Nano-Pulse Stimulation system is a novel, non-thermal tech platform designed to deliver nanosecond duration energy pulses intended to disrupt functions of internal cell structures while maintaining outer cell membranes, the Hayward, Calif.-based company said. Pulse Biosciences said that the device’s mechanism of action has been shown in previous clinical studies to eliminate treated cells with only mild inflammatory response and favorable healin...
Source: Mass Device - October 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Cosmetic/Aesthetic Pulse Biosciences Source Type: news

Construction of multifunctional boron nitride nanosheet towards reducing toxic volatiles (CO and HCN) generation and fire hazard of thermoplastic polyurethane - Wang J, Zhang D, Zhang Y, Cai W, Yao C, Hu Y, Hu W.
Considerable toxic volatiles (CO and HCN) generation and high fire hazard has definitely compromised the application of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). Here, a novel functionalization strategy for bulky h-BN is adopted to obtain the multifunctional CPBN,... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Latest Cornell dot features a new cancer weapon: Antibodies
(Cornell University) Ulrich Wiesner, the Spencer T. Olin Professor of Engineering in materials science and engineering at Cornell University, in collaboration with Dr. Michelle Bradbury of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and Weill Cornell Medicine, has proposed a novel approach to antibody-based imaging of cancer, using ultrasmall silica nanoparticles -- better known as 'Cornell dots' (or C dots) -- invented in his lab more than a dozen years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The twisted carbon nanotube story
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Engineering, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Entropy-driven stability of chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes
Single-walled carbon nanotubes are hollow cylinders that can grow centimeters long via carbon incorporation at the interface with a catalyst. They display semiconducting or metallic characteristics, depending on their helicity, which is determined during their growth. To support the quest for a selective synthesis, we develop a thermodynamic model that relates the tube-catalyst interfacial energies, temperature, and the resulting tube chirality. We show that nanotubes can grow chiral because of the configurational entropy of their nanometer-sized edge, thus explaining experimentally observed temperature evolutions of chira...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Magnin, Y., Amara, H., Ducastelle, F., Loiseau, A., Bichara, C. Tags: Engineering, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Fighting forgetfulness with nanotechnology
(Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research) About 29 million people around the world are affected by the disease 'Alzheimer'. In an international collaboration, scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz together with teams from Italy, Great Britain, Belgium and the USA are now working together on an approach for a therapy. On the one hand, the goal is to understand the processes occurring in the brain that lead to the disease; on the other hand the development of a method for targeted drug delivery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tiny tools for a big industry
(American Chemical Society) Even with technological advances in recent years, the petroleum industry still struggles to squeeze as much oil and gas as possible out of underground reservoirs. Now the big industry is looking to nanotechnology to boost efficiency. According to an article inChemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the tiny particles could help pinpoint oil pockets, monitor underground conditions and extract more trapped oil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

DGIST, identifying an initial growth process of calcium phosphate
(DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology)) Korean researchers identified the initial growth process of calcium phosphate, a key component of bones, using 'TOP-MEIS (Time-of-Flight Medium Energy Ion Scattering)'. The research findings differ from existing theories and are expected to be used in research into controlling the growth and characteristics of nanoparticles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

This bacterium gets paid in gold
(University of California - Berkeley) UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab scientists have placed light-absorbing gold nanoclusters inside a bacterium, creating a biohybrid system that produces a higher yield of chemical products, such as biofuels, than previously demonstrated. The biohybrid captures sunlight and carbon dioxide to make chemicals useful not only on Earth but also in the exotic environment of space. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Preassembled GPCR signaling complexes mediate distinct cellular responses to ultralow ligand concentrations
G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of cell surface signaling proteins, participate in nearly all physiological processes, and are the targets of 30% of marketed drugs. Typically, nanomolar to micromolar concentrations of ligand are used to activate GPCRs in experimental systems. We detected GPCR responses to a wide range of ligand concentrations, from attomolar to millimolar, by measuring GPCR-stimulated production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) with high spatial and temporal resolution. Mathematical modeling showed that femtomolar concentrations of ligand activated, on average, 40% o...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - October 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Civciristov, S., Ellisdon, A. M., Suderman, R., Pon, C. K., Evans, B. A., Kleifeld, O., Charlton, S. J., Hlavacek, W. S., Canals, M., Halls, M. L. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Big discoveries about tiny particles
(University of Delaware) Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoparticles are essential to realizing their promise in being used to create exciting new products. This new research has taken a significant step toward gaining the knowledge that can lead to better performance with products using polymer nanoparticles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How can gold help repair muscle injuries?
In a new and innovative study, researchers have found that gold nanoparticles attached to anti-inflammatory agents can work to promote muscle regeneration. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Muscular Dystrophy / ALS Source Type: news

Nanoplatform developed with three molecular imaging modalities for tumor diagnosis
(Universidad Complutense de Madrid) Nanotechnology and biotechnology are bringing us increasingly closer to personalised cancer treatment. With proven effectiveness in mice, the JANUS hybrid nanoplatform developed by a team of researchers from the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) incorporates three types of molecular medical imaging to locate and diagnose solid tumours, thereby increasing the sensitivity, resolution and specificity of these tests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nanopore technology with DNA computing easily detects microRNA patterns of lung cancer
(Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology) Researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have developed a simple technique that allows detection of two independent microRNAs as an early diagnosis marker of Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) , which is very aggressive. In this technique, they combined nanopore and DNA computing technologies as rapid and label-free detection. This method, therefore, could help to identify SCLC in the early stage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New method measures single molecules from nanoliter of blood in real time
(University of Groningen) University of Groningen scientists, led by Associate Professor of Chemical Biology Giovanni Maglia, have designed a nanopore system that is capable of measuring different metabolites simultaneously in a variety of biological fluids, all in a matter of seconds. The electrical output signal is easily integrated into electronic devices for home diagnostics. The results were published in Nature Communications on Oct. 5. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Applying Nanotechnologies for Immunotherapy
Nanotechnological strategies are making preclinical strides toward more effective, less toxic, immunotherapies. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - October 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Source Type: news

How Scientists Are Treating Breast Cancer Using the Immune System
As a pharmacist, Kathy James considers herself well educated about the importance of getting regular cancer screenings. Even though the 55-year-old had no history of cancer in her family, she never skipped her regular mammograms, and she gave herself regular breast exams. So she was dumbfounded when, during one of those self-exams in May 2017, she felt a marble-size lump in her left breast. A visit to the doctor confirmed it. “The radiologist came in with his hands in his pockets and looked down and said, ‘It doesn’t look good,'” James says. After a biopsy, James and her husband learned she had meta...
Source: TIME: Health - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized breast cancer news Frontiers of Medicine Source Type: news

How Scientists Are Treating Breast Cancer Using the Immune System
As a pharmacist, Kathy James considers herself well educated about the importance of getting regular cancer screenings. Even though the 55-year-old had no history of cancer in her family, she never skipped her regular mammograms, and she gave herself regular breast exams. So she was dumbfounded when, during one of those self-exams in May 2017, she felt a marble-size lump in her left breast. A visit to the doctor confirmed it. “The radiologist came in with his hands in his pockets and looked down and said, ‘It doesn’t look good,'” James says. After a biopsy, James and her husband learned she had meta...
Source: TIME: Science - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized breast cancer news Frontiers of Medicine Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Immunotherapy: 'Killer' cells get boost in fight against cancer
Nanoparticles can boost the immune system's natural killer cells in the fight against cancer, making immunotherapy successful in more patients. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Nanoparticles to treat snakebites
(PLOS) Venomous snakebites affect 2.5 million people, and annually cause more than 100,000 deaths and leave 400,000 individuals with permanent physical and psychological trauma each year. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now described a new approach to treating snake bites, using nanoparticles to bind to venom toxins and prevent the spread of venom through the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Quantifying hot carrier and thermal contributions in plasmonic photocatalysis
We report the substantial light-induced reduction of the thermal activation barrier for ammonia decomposition on a plasmonic photocatalyst. We introduce the concept of a light-dependent activation barrier to account for the effect of light illumination on electronic and thermal excitations in a single unified picture. This framework provides insight into the specific role of hot carriers in plasmon-mediated photochemistry, which is critically important for designing energy-efficient plasmonic photocatalysts. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zhou, L., Swearer, D. F., Zhang, C., Robatjazi, H., Zhao, H., Henderson, L., Dong, L., Christopher, P., Carter, E. A., Nordlander, P., Halas, N. J. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

In situ collection of dust grains falling from Saturns rings into its atmosphere
We report the direct in situ detection of material from Saturn’s dense rings by the CDA impact mass spectrometer. Most detected grains are a few tens of nanometers in size and dynamically associated with the previously inferred "ring rain." Silicate and water-ice grains were identified, in proportions that vary with latitude. Silicate grains constitute up to 30% of infalling grains, a higher percentage than the bulk silicate content of the rings. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hsu, H.-W., Schmidt, J., Kempf, S., Postberg, F., Moragas-Klostermeyer, G., Seiss, M., Hoffmann, H., Burton, M., Ye, S., Kurth, W. S., Horanyi, M., Khawaja, N., Spahn, F., Schirdewahn, D., ODonoghue, J., Moore, L., Cuzzi, J., Jones, G. H., Srama, R. Tags: Geochemistry, Geophysics, Online Only, Planetary Science special/r-articles Source Type: news

Dust grains fall from Saturns D-ring into its equatorial upper atmosphere
The sizes of Saturn’s ring particles range from meters (boulders) to nanometers (dust). Determination of the rings’ ages depends on loss processes, including the transport of dust into Saturn’s atmosphere. During the Grand Finale orbits of the Cassini spacecraft, its instruments measured tiny dust grains that compose the innermost D-ring of Saturn. The nanometer-sized dust experiences collisions with exospheric (upper atmosphere) hydrogen and molecular hydrogen, which forces it to fall from the ring into the ionosphere and lower atmosphere. We used the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument to detect and chara...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mitchell, D. G., Perry, M. E., Hamilton, D. C., Westlake, J. H., Kollmann, P., Smith, H. T., Carbary, J. F., Waite, J. H., Perryman, R., Hsu, H.- W., Wahlund, J.- E., Morooka, M. W., Hadid, L. Z., Persoon, A. M., Kurth, W. S. Tags: Geochemistry, Geophysics, Online Only, Planetary Science special/r-articles Source Type: news

Nanosonics launches US probe disinfection system
Nanosonics announced that its new trophon2 high-level disinfection system for...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: GE partners with Nanosonics (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 3, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

NanoValent Pharmaceuticals Awarded NIH SBIR Grants Totaling ~$4...
NanoValent Pharmaceuticals, Inc., (NanoValent) a development-stage pharmaceutical company advancing targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) like, lipid based therapeutics, today announced the National...(PRWeb October 01, 2018)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/nanovalent_pharmaceuticals_awarded_nih_sbir_grants_totaling_4_million/prweb15774427.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - October 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New nanotherapy offers hope in treating drug-resistant renal cell carcinoma
A research team led by Arun Iyer, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences in the Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at Wayne State University, has developed a nanoplatform technology that works in combination with existing chemotherapeutic drugs that may reverse drug-resistance in renal cell carcinoma.09/26/2018 (Source: Kidney Cancer Association)
Source: Kidney Cancer Association - September 26, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news

Breakthrough In Nanotechnology Brings Nanomotors Closer To Reality For Drug Delivery
Researchers have now developed the first approach for altering the mechanical motion of nanomotors by using visible light as the stimulus. The implications of this discovery are far reaching and may lead to a new class of nanorobotic and nanoelectromechanical devices for drug delivery. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 26, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robert Glatter, MD, Contributor Source Type: news

Nano-Optic Endoscope Offers Anatomic Pathologists, Medical Laboratories Higher Resolution and Precision Optical Imaging
New metalens technology from MGH and SEAS researchers gives greater endoscopic optical imaging resolution and sample detail for anatomic pathologists performing diagnostics Anatomic pathologists and clinical laboratories know that biopsy samples are necessary to diagnose many diseases. But, current endoscopic imaging techniques used by physicians sometimes fail to clearly visualize disease sites. Consequently, biopsies collected […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - September 26, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations adenocarcinoma anatomic path Source Type: news

Partnership with Google to grow quantum software industry in the UK
The University of Bristol is joining forces with UCL and Google to launch a £ 5.5m Prosperity Partnership, which aims to harness the revolutionary power of quantum computers for applications in modelling and simulation. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - September 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Business and Enterprise, Grants and Awards; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, The Bristol Centre for Nanoscience and Quantum Information, Faculty of Science, School of Physics, Faculty of Science, School of Mathematics, Institutes, Institutes, Brist Source Type: news

New nanotherapy offers hope in treating drug-resistant renal cell carcinoma
(Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research) A research team led by Arun Iyer, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences in the Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at Wayne State University, has developed a nanoplatform technology that works in combination with existing chemotherapeutic drugs that may reverse drug-resistance in renal cell carcinoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UT engineers develop first method for controlling nanomotors
(University of Texas at Austin) Engineers at UT Austin develop world's first method for controlling the motion of nanomotors with simple visible light as the stimulus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Viral RNA sensing
(Wiley) Even tiny amounts of viruses can have disastrous consequences. RNA identification can reveal the type of virus present. A fast and sensitive technique based on optical detection has now been outlined in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Scientists from Germany and Finland have demonstrated the binding of an RNA target to a probe made of gold nanorods and a DNA origami structure. Chirality switches triggered by binding can be measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chitinase as 'burnt-bridge' Brownian monorail efficiently hydrolyzing recalcitrant biomass
(National Institutes of Natural Sciences) Serratia marcescens Chitinase A (SmChiA) is a molecular motor efficiently hydrolyzing recalcitrant crystalline chitin by moving on the surface processively. By using gold-nanoparticle probe, researchers revealed 1-nm stepping motion of SmChiA rectified forward by fast catalysis. X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulation also revealed that motion of SmChiA is driven by the Brownian motion. The results show SmChiA is 'burnt-bridge' Brownian ratchet monorail, and give an insight to design engineered and artificial molecular motors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nucleation a boon to sustainable nanomanufacturing
(Washington University in St. Louis) Young-Shin Jun, professor of energy, environmental& chemical engineering in the School of Engineering& Applied Science, and Quingun Li, a former doctoral student in her lab, are the first to measure the activation energy and kinetic factors of calcium carbonate's nucleation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Silver nanoparticles are toxic for aquatic organisms
(University of the Basque Country) Silver nanoparticles are increasingly being used in consumer products, such as clothing and personal care products, in the medical and pharmaceutical industry, and in the food industry. That is why their presence is expected to increase in the environment where they can exert harmful effects on organisms. The UPV/EHU's 'Cell Biology in Environmental Toxicology' research group has analysed adult zebrafish to find out the effects that in the long term can be caused by these silver particles present in fresh water. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news