COVID Vaccine Questions Answered: Can You Still Catch Virus After First Dose?
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Around the Nation Health News Dr. Mallika Marshall Dr. Max Gomez Norm Elrod Vaccination Source Type: news

Target discovered that halts osteoarthritis-type knee cartilage degeneration
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) In a mouse study, researchers used nanotechnology and previous knowledge of a protein pathway to significantly reduce knee cartilage degeneration and pain (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In lab study, nanoparticle shows promising results for treating severe allergies
For about 1 in 13 children in the U.S., usually harmless foodstuffs such as milk, eggs and peanuts can send the body ’s natural defenses into overdrive.Symptoms of food allergies can vary widely, but at worst, a systemwide allergic response can lead to anaphylaxis, a life-threatening condition characterized by a sudden drop in blood pressure and difficulty breathing.Although there are now some preventive measures for food-induced anaphylaxis, there are not yet any long-lasting solutions — treatments capable of locking the immune system into a state of tolerance, so that it doesn’t respond to allergens.Now...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 14, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life
(Universit à di Trento) A breakthrough that has implications for molecular biology, pharmacology and nanotechnologies. The fields of application are many. Identifying the mechanisms behind neurodegenerative processes in some proteins, for example, can help limit their proliferation. Understanding how a protein takes on a certain shape can open the way to use the nanomachines that nature has designed to cut, edit or block damaged or defective genes. Their study was published in the international academic journal Physical Review Letters (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Driving energetically unfavorable dehydrogenation dynamics with plasmonics
Nanoparticle surface structure and geometry generally dictate where chemical transformations occur, with higher chemical activity at sites with lower activation energies. Here, we show how optical excitation of plasmons enables spatially modified phase transformations, activating otherwise energetically unfavorable sites. We have designed a crossed-bar Au-PdHx antenna-reactor system that localizes electromagnetic enhancement away from the innately reactive PdHx nanorod tips. Using optically coupled in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy, we track the dehydrogenation of individual antenna-reactor pairs with ...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sytwu, K., Vadai, M., Hayee, F., Angell, D. K., Dai, A., Dixon, J., Dionne, J. A. Tags: Materials Science, Physics reports Source Type: news

Scientists study nanocapsules in the search for an antibiotic-free approach to superbugs
(Natural News) Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem around the world, with multiple strains of bacteria now showing adaptations designed to increase their protection against the drugs that have been formulated to kill them. One such pathogen is Helicobacter pylori, which, according to current data, is carried by around 4.4 billion people worldwide, although it... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shine on: Avalanching nanoparticles break barriers to imaging cells in real time
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) A team of researchers co-led by Berkeley Lab and Columbia University has developed a new material called avalanching nanoparticles that, when used as a microscopic probe, offers a simpler approach to taking high-resolution, real-time snapshots of a cell's inner workings at the nanoscale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nanotechnology prevents premature birth in mouse studies
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In a study in mice and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say that they have developed a tiny, yet effective method for preventing premature birth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New method helps   pocket-sized   DNA sequencer achieve near-perfect accuracy  
(University of British Columbia) Researchers have found a simple way to eliminate almost all sequencing errors produced by a widely used portable DNA   sequencer (Oxford Nanopore Technologies'   MinION   device). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New small antibodies show promising effects against COVID-19 infection
(Karolinska Institutet) Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed, in collaboration with researchers in Germany and the US, new small antibodies, also known as nanobodies, which prevent the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus from entering human cells. The research study, published in Science, shows that a combined nanobody had a particularly good effect - even if the virus mutated. According to the researchers, the nanobodies have the potential to be developed into a treatment for COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 12, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nanoparticle immunization technology could protect against many strains of coronaviruses
(California Institute of Technology) Caltech researchers are studying a new type of immunization that may be able to protect against many variants of viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 12, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nanoparticles developed for traumatic brain injury
Researchers designed a system to effectively deliver drugs across the blood brain barrier in mice using nanoparticles. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - January 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Science - January 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Health - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Laser harmony
(Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences) Would you like to capture a chemical transformation inside a cell live? Or maybe revolutionize microchips' production by printing paths in a layer that has a thickness of just 100 nanometers? These and many other goals can now be achieved with the latest femtosecond laser created by a team of scientists led by Dr. Yuriy Stepanenko. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Three cases of acute lung injury caused by occupational hydrogen sulfide poisoning - Liang Y, Zhang JJ, Gao Y, Zhang H.
OBJECTIVE To investigate the pathogenesis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in rats induced by nano-indium-tin oxide exposure, and to provide a basis for further determining the limit of occupational exposure to indium and developing related protection ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Coronavirus COVID-19 serology and viral detection tests: technical validation reports, DHSC (updated 8th January 2021)
Latest Updates 8 January 2021 Deleted the Latus validation report and added the Nonacus report. 7 January 2021 Added a new technical validation report (Latus). 23 December 2020 Added Oxford Nanopore: LamPORE: RNA RT-qPCR validation report. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nanoparticle vaccine for COVID-19
(Stanford University) Researchers at Stanford are working to develop a single-dose vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 that could potentially be stored at room temperature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Single-dose COVID-19 vaccine triggers antibody response in mice
(American Chemical Society) Across the world, health care workers and high-risk groups are beginning to receive COVID-19 vaccines, offering hope for a return to normalcy amidst the pandemic. However, the vaccines authorized for emergency use in the U.S. require two doses to be effective, which can create problems with logistics and compliance. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a nanoparticle vaccine that elicits a virus-neutralizing antibody response in mice after only a single dose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nanocrystals that eradicate bacteria biofilm
(Pohang University of Science& Technology (POSTECH)) POSTECH-UNIST joint research team finds ways to control the surface texture of nanostructures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Detecting COVID-19 antibodies in 10-12 seconds
(College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University) Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University report findings on an advanced nanomaterial-based biosensing platform that detects, within seconds, antibodies specific to SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to testing, the platform will help to quantify patient immunological response to the new vaccines with precision. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study reveals new details about how bacterial toxins cause life-threatening colitis
FINDINGSResearch led by scientists from UCLA and Harvard University has uncovered details about how the bacterium Clostridioides difficile causes excessive inflammation in the gut that can lead to potentially deadly colitis. Studying C. difficile toxin A, one of two toxins released by the bacterium, the researchers produced two key findings.They pinpointed which part of the toxic protein can permeate cell membranes to gain entry to cellular structures called endosomes, demonstrating that even fragments of the protein that contain that key segment are capable of accessing endosomes.In addition, they revealed how the toxin m...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 8, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Chemists invent shape-shifting nanomaterial with biomedical potential
(Emory Health Sciences) Made of synthetic collagen, the new nanomaterial may have a range of biomedical applications, from controlled-release drug delivery to tissue engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 7, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nanodroplets and ultrasound 'drills' prove effective at tackling tough blood clots
(North Carolina State University) Engineering researchers have developed a new technique for eliminating particularly tough blood clots, using engineered nanodroplets and an ultrasound " drill " to break up the clots from the inside out. The technique has not yet gone through clinical testing. In vitro testing has shown promising results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A noninflammatory mRNA vaccine for treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
The ability to control autoreactive T cells without inducing systemic immune suppression is the major goal for treatment of autoimmune diseases. The key challenge is the safe and efficient delivery of pharmaceutically well-defined antigens in a noninflammatory context. Here, we show that systemic delivery of nanoparticle-formulated 1 methylpseudouridine-modified messenger RNA (m1 mRNA) coding for disease-related autoantigens results in antigen presentation on splenic CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells in the absence of costimulatory signals. In several mouse models of multiple sclerosis, the disease is suppressed by treatment...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Krienke, C., Kolb, L., Diken, E., Streuber, M., Kirchhoff, S., Bukur, T., Akilli-Öztürk, O., Kranz, L. M., Berger, H., Petschenka, J., Diken, M., Kreiter, S., Yogev, N., Waisman, A., Kariko, K., Türeci, O., Sahin, U. Tags: Immunology, Medicine, Diseases r-articles Source Type: news

Nanox, USARad plan AI-powered radiology service
X-ray technology company Nanox and teleradiology services provider USARad are...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: USARad nets radiology AI utility patent Nanox, Ambra Health ink deal Turmoil roils x-ray developer Nanox Nanox, SPI to bring digital x-rays to Mexico USARad names new chief medical strategist Nanox, USARad partner to bring 3,000 systems to the U.S. (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 5, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Nanox and USARD expand their radiology diagnostic partnership; Sera Prognostics and Anthem launch a neonatal outcomes study; and more digital health deals
Also: Withings ’ remote monitoring system becomes widely available through Redox partnership. Renalytix AI and DaVita team up to offer early intervention for kidney disease. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - January 5, 2021 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Mainstream science admits COVID-19 vaccines contain mRNA "nanoparticles" that trigger severe allergic reactions
(Natural News) At least eight people who were vaccinated for the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) in the days immediately following the jab’s initial release back in December suffered severe allergic reactions that mainstream science is now claiming were caused by toxic messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticles. A compound known as polyethylene glycol (PEG) that was added to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Spider-Man-style medical gun spins out 'skin substitute' for burns
Israeli firm claims device allows patients to move freely and does away with painful dressingsDoctors in Europe, India and Israel have begun using a medical gun that spins out a protective web to cover burns and wounds, hoping the breathable “skin substitute” will help patients recover without the need for painful bandage changes.Nanomedic, an Israeli company that designedthe Spincare system, claims its device gives patients increased mobility – often essential for burn rehabilitation – and even the ability to shower, a process that can be difficult with traditional bandages. The translucent layer i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Holmes in Jerusalem Tags: Israel Medical research Science Europe India Middle East and North Africa South and Central Asia World news Source Type: news

Nanoparticle drug-delivery system developed to treat brain disorders
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) To facilitate successful delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain, a team of bioengineers, physicians, and collaborators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital created a nanoparticle platform, which can facilitate therapeutically effective delivery of encapsulated agents in mice with a physically breached or intact BBB. In a mouse model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), they observed that the delivery system showed three times more accumulation in brain than conventional methods of delivery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nanoscale control of internal inhomogeneity enhances water transport in desalination membranes
Biological membranes can achieve remarkably high permeabilities, while maintaining ideal selectivities, by relying on well-defined internal nanoscale structures in the form of membrane proteins. Here, we apply such design strategies to desalination membranes. A series of polyamide desalination membranes—which were synthesized in an industrial-scale manufacturing line and varied in processing conditions but retained similar chemical compositions—show increasing water permeability and active layer thickness with constant sodium chloride selectivity. Transmission electron microscopy measurements enabled us to dete...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Culp, T. E., Khara, B., Brickey, K. P., Geitner, M., Zimudzi, T. J., Wilbur, J. D., Jons, S. D., Roy, A., Paul, M., Ganapathysubramanian, B., Zydney, A. L., Kumar, M., Gomez, E. D. Tags: Engineering, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Achieving large uniform tensile elasticity in microfabricated diamond
Diamond is not only the hardest material in nature, but is also an extreme electronic material with an ultrawide bandgap, exceptional carrier mobilities, and thermal conductivity. Straining diamond can push such extreme figures of merit for device applications. We microfabricated single-crystalline diamond bridge structures with ~1 micrometer length by ~100 nanometer width and achieved sample-wide uniform elastic strains under uniaxial tensile loading along the [100], [101], and [111] directions at room temperature. We also demonstrated deep elastic straining of diamond microbridge arrays. The ultralarge, highly controllab...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Dang, C., Chou, J.-P., Dai, B., Chou, C.-T., Yang, Y., Fan, R., Lin, W., Meng, F., Hu, A., Zhu, J., Han, J., Minor, A. M., Li, J., Lu, Y. Tags: Engineering, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

High-speed atomic force microscopy takes on intrinsically disordered proteins
(Kanazawa University) Kanazawa University's pioneering high-speed atomic force microscope technology has now shed light on the structure and dynamics of some of life's most ubiquitous and inscrutable molecules - intrinsically disordered proteins. The study is reported inNature Nanotechnology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chemotherapy 'is made a THIRD more effective' with magnetic nanoparticles
Researchers at University College London found the combination of heat and chemo drugs makes the treatment more effective. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mini antibodies against COVID-19 isolated from llama may prevent infection
Preliminary results, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggest that the nanobody appears to work equally well in either liquid or aerosol form, suggesting it could remain effective after inhalation. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - December 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Importance of domain-specific metacognition for explaining beliefs about politicized science: the case of climate change - Fischer H, Said N.
One of the oldest debates in psychological research into politicized science such as nanotechnology, vaccination, or climate change centers around the role of knowledge. Does increased knowledge of the science affect beliefs about it? While research has tr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Coronavirus COVID-19 serology and viral detection tests: technical validation reports, DHSC (updated 23rd December 2020)
Findings from technical validations and in-service valuations reviewed by the Technical Validation Group. 23 December 2020 Added Oxford Nanopore: LamPORE: RNA RT-qPCR validation report. 16 December 2020 Add a new technical validation report (QuantuMDx). 7 December 2020 First published. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - December 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Assessment and procurement of coronavirus (COVID-19) tests, DHSC (updated 23rd December 2020)
How the government assesses offers of COVID-19 tests from developers for procurement and use in the UK. 23 December 2020 Added Oxford Nanopore: LamPORE: RNA RT-qPCR to validated technology table in'National technical validation process for manufacturers of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) tests'. 22 December 2020 Updated'National technical validation process for manufacturers of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) tests'to reflect the number of technologies currently in the TVG pipeline. 17 December 2020 Updated'National technical validation process for manufacturers of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) tests'to add a new validated technology (QuantuM...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - December 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Understanding nanoparticle entry mechanism into tumors
(Compuscript Ltd) Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this commentary the authors Phei Er Saw and Sangyong Jon from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Korea, consider how the entry mechanism of nanoparticles into tumors determines the future direction of nanomedicine development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exclusive: This D.C. med-tech startup is raising new funding for its 3D-printed implant
Nanochon is aiming to close the round in January to fund the first human study of its product. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - December 22, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

NIH neuroscientists isolate promising mini antibodies against COVID-19 from a llama
Preliminary results suggest anti-COVID19 nanobodies may be effective at preventing and diagnosing infections. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - December 22, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

New electron microscopy technique offers first look at previously hidden processes
(Northwestern University) Northwestern researchers have developed a new microscopy method that allows scientists to see the building blocks of 'smart' materials being formed at the nanoscale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NIH neuroscientists isolate promising mini antibodies against COVID-19 from a llama
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) National Institutes of Health researchers have isolated a set of promising, tiny antibodies, or " nanobodies, " against SARS-CoV-2 that were produced by a llama named Cormac. Preliminary results suggest that at least one of these nanobodies, called NIH-CoVnb-112, could prevent infections and detect virus particles by grabbing hold of SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins. In addition, the nanobody appeared to work equally well in either liquid or aerosol form, suggesting it could remain effective after inhalation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nanoplastics alter intestinal microbiome and threaten human health
(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) A review study led by the Universitat Aut ò noma de Barcelona (UAB), the CREAF and the University of Aveiro concludes that nanoplastics change the composition and diversity of gut microbiome in vertebrates and invertebrates. The effects of a widespread and prolonged exposure to nanoplastics observed in animal models could be applied to humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nanotechnology -- nanoparticles as weapons against cancer
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have developed a novel type of nanoparticle that efficiently and selectively kills cancer cells, thus opening up new therapeutic options for the treatment of tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New nanobiomaterial from the silk of a mite with 'promising biomedical properties'
(Universidad de La Rioja) An international team of researchers has developed a new nanomaterial from the silk produced by the Tetranychus lintearius mite. This nanomaterial has the ability to penetrate human cells without damaging them and, therefore, has " promising biomedical properties " . (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nanobodies that neutralize
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry, Immunology twis Source Type: news

Versatile and multivalent nanobodies efficiently neutralize SARS-CoV-2
In this study, we used camelid immunization and proteomics to identify a large repertoire of highly potent neutralizing nanobodies (Nbs) to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike protein receptor binding domain (RBD). We discovered Nbs with picomolar to femtomolar affinities that inhibit viral infection at concentrations below the nanograms-per-milliliter level, and we determined a structure of one of the most potent Nbs in complex with the RBD. Structural proteomics and integrative modeling revealed multiple distinct and nonoverlapping epitopes and indicated an array of potential neutraliza...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Xiang, Y., Nambulli, S., Xiao, Z., Liu, H., Sang, Z., Duprex, W. P., Schneidman-Duhovny, D., Zhang, C., Shi, Y. Tags: Biochemistry, Immunology reports Source Type: news

An ultrapotent synthetic nanobody neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 by stabilizing inactive Spike
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus enters host cells via an interaction between its Spike protein and the host cell receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). By screening a yeast surface-displayed library of synthetic nanobody sequences, we developed nanobodies that disrupt the interaction between Spike and ACE2. Cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) revealed that one nanobody, Nb6, binds Spike in a fully inactive conformation with its receptor binding domains locked into their inaccessible down state, incapable of binding ACE2. Affinity maturation and structure-guided design o...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Schoof, M., Faust, B., Saunders, R. A., Sangwan, S., Rezelj, V., Hoppe, N., Boone, M., Billesbolle, C. B., Puchades, C., Azumaya, C. M., Kratochvil, H. T., Zimanyi, M., Deshpande, I., Liang, J., Dickinson, S., Nguyen, H. C., Chio, C. M., Merz, G. E., Thom Tags: Biochemistry, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Colorful, magnetic Janus balls could help foil counterfeiters (video)
(American Chemical Society) Counterfeiters who sell knockoffs of popular shoes, handbags and other items are becoming increasingly sophisticated, forcing manufacturers to find new technologies to stay one step ahead. Now, researchers reporting inACS Nano have developed tiny " Janus balls " that show their colored side under a magnetic field. These microparticles could be useful in inks for anti-counterfeiting tags, which could be verified with an ordinary magnet, the researchers say. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news