Johnson & Johnson hits the Big Apple with latest JLabs site
Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) opened its latest life science incubator in New York City, the healthcare giant said today. The 30,000-square-foot JLabs @ NYC is a collaboration between Johnson & Johnson Innovation, New York State and the New York Genome Center. Sited at the genome center in SoHo, the incubator is home to 26 startups and has room for four more, New Brunswick, N.J.-based J&J said. “Johnson & Johnson has deep entrepreneurial roots in New York and we are pleased to see our unique JLabs model applied in this rich ecosystem to foster the creation of new healthcare innovations that have t...
Source: Mass Device - June 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Funding Roundup Research & Development johnsonandjohnson Source Type: news

Researchers solve major challenge in mass production of low-cost solar cells
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) A team led by led by Andr é D. Taylor of NYU Tandon School of Engineering and Yifan Zheng of Peking University solved a major fabrication challenge for perovskite cells -- the intriguing potential challengers to silicon-based solar cells. In a cover article in the June 28, 2018 issue of Nanoscale, a publication of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the team reveals a new scalable means of applying the compound PCBM, a critical component, to perovskite cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A nanostructure quantum simulator
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stajic, J. Tags: Physics twis Source Type: news

Anomalously low dielectric constant of confined water
We report local capacitance measurements for water confined between two atomically flat walls separated by various distances down to 1 nanometer. Our experiments reveal the presence of an interfacial layer with vanishingly small polarization such that its out-of-plane is only ~2. The electrically dead layer is found to be two to three molecules thick. These results provide much-needed feedback for theories describing water-mediated surface interactions and the behavior of interfacial water, and show a way to investigate the dielectric properties of other fluids and solids under extreme confinement. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Fumagalli, L., Esfandiar, A., Fabregas, R., Hu, S., Ares, P., Janardanan, A., Yang, Q., Radha, B., Taniguchi, T., Watanabe, K., Gomila, G., Novoselov, K. S., Geim, A. K. Tags: Physics, Applied reports Source Type: news

Supplement your diet with vitamin D3 to have a healthier heart and cardiovascular system
(Natural News) Vitamin D provides other health benefits besides supporting bone health. A study published in the International Journal of Nanomedicine found that vitamin D3, which is naturally produced by the body when the skin is exposed to the sun, can also make the cardiovascular system healthier. The study was carried out by a team of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A collaborative development of a dengue vaccine candidate
(Institut Pasteur) In-Cell-Art (ICA), a biotechnology company specialized in nanocarrier technologies, BioNet-Asia (BNA), an innovative vaccine developer, and the research team led by Dr. Anavaj Sakuntabhai at the Functional Genetics of Infectious Diseases Unit, Institut Pasteur Paris France, (GFMI-IP), announce today the promising development of Nanotaxi ® formulated DNA vaccine to induce strong immune response against dengue virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 20, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A collaborative development of a dengue vaccine candidate successful in preclinical study
(Institut Pasteur) In-Cell-Art (ICA), a biotechnology company specialized in nanocarrier technologies, BioNet-Asia (BNA), an innovative vaccine developer, and the research team led by Dr. Anavaj Sakuntabhai at the Functional Genetics of Infectious Diseases Unit, Institut Pasteur Paris France, (GFMI-IP), announce today the promising development of Nanotaxi ® formulated DNA vaccine to induce strong immune response against dengue virus, after successful preclinical study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nano-sized cellulose fibers beat spider silk in being the strongest material on Earth
(Natural News) What is the strongest material on Earth? If you answered “spider silk,” you have just named the former champion, now demoted to second place. In a study published in ACS Nano, researchers reported that new nanoscale cellulose fibers have become the Superman of building materials. Many of our scientific advances pale in comparison to what nature has... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Army plans to license nanogalvanic aluminum powder discovery
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) The US Army Research Laboratory plans to license its discovery of a nanogalvanic aluminum powder for hydrogen generation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

HKBU scholars invent medical device for safe growth of neural stem cells
(Hong Kong Baptist University) The research team of Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) invented a medical device with a specific nanotechnology layer for the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tattoo-Like Sensor Could Provide Continuous Monitoring of Vital Signs
Sometimes a doctor needs to measure his or her patient’s cardiac activity for longer than a brief ECG reading would record. In this instance, a physician might prescribe a Holter monitor to record long-term vital signs during normal physical activity, but these devices can have some drawbacks. They might be bulky to wear and could cause itchiness and skin irritations where they are attached to the body. And they don’t provide information in real time. Umana Medical Technologies has developed products that aim to make wearing a heart monitor more convenient for patients and offer the ability of being able to tra...
Source: MDDI - June 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Susan Shepard Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveries
(University of Basel) Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have developed a method for tracing the movement of proteins within the cell. They tagged proteins with tiny nanosensors, so-called nanobodies, which enable the scientists to live track and trace the proteins' pathway through the cell. The method described in the current issue of PNAS is suitable for a wide range of research purposes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computing
(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) Researchers at Los Alamos and partners in France and Germany are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. Their analysis of progress in the field is published in this week's edition of the journal Nature Materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ready or Not, Changes Are Coming to Legacy Device Requirements in the EU
Currently, all medical devices must comply with the Medical Device Directive (MDD) or the Active Implantable Medical Device Directive (AIMDD). However, by 2020, this will change and new medical device products distributed within Europe must comply with the new European Medical Device Regulation (MDR).   Legacy devices, currently manufactured and marketed/CE marked under existing directives, will be expected to meet the new requirements set out in the MDR. However, for devices CE marked under the current directives utilizing a Notified Body there will be an additional transition time of up to four years after full appl...
Source: MDDI - June 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Paul Brooks Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

QUT to put grass pollen research to Swiss nanotech
(Queensland University of Technology) Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia, and Swiss medtech company Abionic SA are collaborating to develop rapid, targeted tests for allergies to subtropical grass pollens -- tests that could be administered in a GP office. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pioneering food packaging
EU-funded researchers are pilot testing a pioneering, nano-based packaging material that releases antimicrobial oils to slow food spoilage and prevent foodborne illnesses. This could bolster Europe's efforts to tackle food waste and food safety. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - June 15, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

A sprinkle of platinum nanoparticles onto graphene makes brain probes more sensitive
(University of California - San Diego) Graphene electrodes could enable higher quality brain imaging thanks to new research by a team of engineers and neuroscientists at UC San Diego. The researchers developed a technique, using platinum nanoparticles, to lower the impedance of graphene electrodes by 100 times while keeping them transparent. In tests on transgenic mice, the electrodes were able to record and image neuronal activity (calcium ion spikes) at of large groups of neurons and individual brain cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop molecular assembly method for cancer therapy and diagnostics
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Cancer is a complex disease to treat, and yet the operating principle of many current treatments is to simply kill healthy cells a little slower than cancerous ones. In response, an international team of researchers from Russia and Australia has developed a sophisticated nanoparticle-based treatment.They created a universal assembly method, which allows a number of molecules with therapeutic and diagnostic potential to be easily combined while preserving their spatial structure and properties. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Minimalist biostructures designed to create nanomaterials
(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) Researchers from the IBB-UAB fabricate 4 molecules of only 7 amino acids with the ability to self-assemble and rapidly and inexpensively form nanomaterials for biomedical and nanotechnological purposes. Inspired on a type of natural assembly seen in amyloid fibres, four peptides were used to create one of the most resistant bionanomaterials described to date, nanocables and mini enzymes to act as a catalyst for the formation of nanomaterials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Improving mechanical sensor performance through larger damping
Mechanical resonances are used in a wide variety of devices, from smartphone accelerometers to computer clocks and from wireless filters to atomic force microscopes. Frequency stability, a critical performance metric, is generally assumed to be tantamount to resonance quality factor (the inverse of the linewidth and of the damping). We show that the frequency stability of resonant nanomechanical sensors can be improved by lowering the quality factor. At high bandwidths, quality-factor reduction is completely mitigated by increases in signal-to-noise ratio. At low bandwidths, notably, increased damping leads to better stabi...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Roy, S. K., Sauer, V. T. K., Westwood-Bachman, J. N., Venkatasubramanian, A., Hiebert, W. K. Tags: Physics, Applied, Engineering, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

E- textiles control home appliances with the swipe of a finger (video)
(American Chemical Society) Electronic textiles could allow a person to control household appliances or computers from a distance simply by touching a wristband or other item of clothing -- something that could be particularly helpful for those with limited mobility. Now researchers, reporting in ACS Nano, have developed a new type of e-textile that is self-powered, highly sensitive and washable. A video of an e-wristband in action is available. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Graphene carpets: So neurons communicate better
(Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati) A work led by SISSA and published on Nature Nanotechnology reports for the first time experimentally the phenomenon of ion 'trapping' by graphene carpets and its effect on the communication between neurons. The researchers have observed an increase in the activity of nerve cells grown on a single layer of graphene. Combining theoretical and experimental approaches they have shown that the phenomenon is due to the ability of the material to 'trap' several ions present in the surrounding environment on its surface, modulating its composition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nanobiotechnology researchers seek natural agrochemicals to use for crop protection
(Natural News) Zealous overuse of synthetic agrochemicals to protect food crops from microbial pests has backfired on the agricultural industry. Not only has the environment ended up heavily contaminated, but the microbes are now gaining resistances to the chemicals. An article in Nanowerk.com states that nanobiotechnology experts are seeking out biological and natural alternatives. The... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Precision NanoSystems raises $6m to fund nanomedicine manufacturing tech
Vancouver-based Precision NanoSystems said today that it closed a $6m Series B round, with investments from 5AM Ventures, Telegraph Hill Partners and Rising Tide Fund. The company is slated to use its newly-acquired funds to support the expansion of its services, including its nanomedicine manufacturing platform, NanoAssemblr. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Precision NanoSystems raises $6m to fund nanomedicine manufacturing tech appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - June 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Funding Roundup Pharmaceuticals precisionnanosystems Source Type: news

A new way to measure energy in microscopic machines
(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) In work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. By using microscopy to track and analyze the fluctuating motion or configuration of single molecules or other small objects, the new method can be applied to a greater variety of microscopic and nanoscopic systems than previous techniques. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Silk hybrid material can attack bacteria when illuminated by a green light
(Natural News) Indiana and Korean researchers have found a way to fuse a far-red fluorescent protein into silk. When exposed to green light, the resulting material will release molecules that kill bacteria and other dangerous pathogens, according to a NanoWerk article. Touted to be all-natural by its creators, the new biomaterial offers an alternative way to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Imaging-based molecular barcoding with pixelated dielectric metasurfaces
Metasurfaces provide opportunities for wavefront control, flat optics, and subwavelength light focusing. We developed an imaging-based nanophotonic method for detecting mid-infrared molecular fingerprints and implemented it for the chemical identification and compositional analysis of surface-bound analytes. Our technique features a two-dimensional pixelated dielectric metasurface with a range of ultrasharp resonances, each tuned to a discrete frequency; this enables molecular absorption signatures to be read out at multiple spectral points, and the resulting information is then translated into a barcode-like spatial absor...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tittl, A., Leitis, A., Liu, M., Yesilkoy, F., Choi, D.-Y., Neshev, D. N., Kivshar, Y. S., Altug, H. Tags: Physics, Applied reports Source Type: news

Organic matter preserved in 3-billion-year-old mudstones at Gale crater, Mars
We report the in situ detection of organic matter preserved in lacustrine mudstones at the base of the ~3.5-billion-year-old Murray formation at Pahrump Hills, Gale crater, by the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite onboard the Curiosity rover. Diverse pyrolysis products, including thiophenic, aromatic, and aliphatic compounds released at high temperatures (500° to 820°C), were directly detected by evolved gas analysis. Thiophenes were also observed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Their presence suggests that sulfurization aided organic matter preservation. At least 50 nanomoles of organic carbo...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eigenbrode, J. L., Summons, R. E., Steele, A., Freissinet, C., Millan, M., Navarro-Gonzalez, R., Sutter, B., McAdam, A. C., Franz, H. B., Glavin, D. P., Archer, P. D., Mahaffy, P. R., Conrad, P. G., Hurowitz, J. A., Grotzinger, J. P., Gupta, S., Ming, D. Tags: Geochemistry, Geophysics, Planetary Science reports Source Type: news

Turning Surgeons Into Innovators Without Taking Them Out of the OR
Academic hospitals have all the makings for rich medical device development. They have physicians to identify surgical needs, researchers to test theories, bioengineers to design and create devices and patients to participate in clinical trials. However, disconnect between engineering and surgical departments makes innovation a challenge. So does surgeons' all-consuming job Number One—treating patients. Surgical Innovations, part of the University of California, San Francisco's Department of Surgery and Bioengineering & Therapeutic Sciences, aims to open communication between clinical academic surgeons and bioeng...
Source: MDDI - June 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Heather R. Johnson Tags: R & D Source Type: news

Scientists see inner workings of enzyme telomerase, which plays key roles in aging, cancer
Cancer, aging-related diseases and other illnesses are closely tied to an important enzyme called “telomerase.” UCLA researchersreport in the journal  Cell the deepest scientific understanding yet of this once-mysterious enzyme, whose catalytic core — where most of its activity occurs — can now be seen in near atomic resolution.“We’re now seeing not just the face of the clock, we’re seeing how the components inside interact to make it work,” said Juli Feigon, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry in the UCLA College and a senior author of the study. “At ea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

NASA funds Rutgers scientists' pursuit of the origins of life
(Rutgers University) What are the origins of life on Earth and possibly elsewhere? Did 'protein nanomachines' evolve here before life began to catalyze and support the development of living things? Could the same thing have happened on Mars, the moons of Jupiter and Neptune, and elsewhere in the universe? (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nanomedical Diagnostics Releases Report on Field Effect Biosensing...
ITC, commonly used to analyze small molecule and protein interactions, consumes large amounts of sample and has low throughput. Nanomedical Diagnostics presents a possible alternative.(PRWeb June 05, 2018)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/06/prweb15530954.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - June 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Abbott is developing a dual-chamber leadless pacer
Even before its acquisition by Abbott, St. Jude Medical had begun developing a dual-chamber leadless pacemaker, which would be a first if it succeeds. Abbott and Medtronic are the only companies that have developed single-chamber leadless pacemakers; St. Jude recalled its version, Nanostim, in October 2017 after receiving 7 reports of lost telemetry and pacing output. Get the rest of the story at our sister site, Medical Design & Outsourcing. The post Abbott is developing a dual-chamber leadless pacer appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - June 4, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Cardiovascular Research & Development Abbott Cardiac Rhythm Management Source Type: news

New nanoparticles help to detect serious scarring of wounds
(Nanyang Technological University) A new way of seeing when heavy wound scars are forming, and providing doctors the chance to intervene, has been developed by scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Northwestern University in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 4, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Oil companies in Saudi Arabia use nanotechnology for petroleum extraction to minimize environmental pollution
(Natural News) There are few greater oxymorons than “environment-friendly oil company,” especially if said company is the biggest example in the world. But Saudi Aramco is trying to do just that, using nanotechnology to max out the petroleum from its oil wells while minimizing environmental pollution, an article in Nanowerks stated. Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) professor... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Novel microscopy technique developed to analyze cellular focal adhesion dynamics
(Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology) Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory at the University of Illinois have developed a new form of microscopy that allows them to observe the formation and evolution of cell membrane focal adhesions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nanorobots help remove bacteria, toxins from blood
Nanorobots that are about 25 times smaller than the width of a human hair have been developed to remove harmful bacteria and toxins by swimming through blood. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists use a photonic quantum simulator to make virtual movies of molecules vibrating
Scientists have shown how an optical chip can simulate the motion of atoms within molecules at the quantum level, which could lead to better ways of creating chemicals for use as pharmaceuticals. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 30, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Physics, Faculty of Science, The Bristol Centre for Nanoscience and Quantum Information, Institutes, Institutes, Bristol Quantum Information Institute; Press Release Source Type: news

Silk fibers may become the secret ingredient in the next round of high tech natural “metamaterials”
(Natural News) Far from just being a luxurious clothing material, silk could have numerous applications in engineering and biomedicine. This was the conclusion that an international team of multi-disciplinary scientists came to in their study, published in Nature Communications. According to the investigators, the nano-architecture of silk makes it highly effective at causing “Anderson localization... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NanOlogy touts preclinical data for inhaled NanoPac cancer drug
NanOlogy touted results today from preclinical studies of its inhaled submicron particle formulation of paclitaxel, NanoPac. The company said animal studies have shown prolonged retention of the cancer drug in lung tissue and significant tumor regression without adverse drug-related side effects. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post NanOlogy touts preclinical data for inhaled NanoPac cancer drug appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - May 29, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Oncology Pharmaceuticals Research & Development nanology Source Type: news

MIT researchers send drug-ferrying nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier
Image courtesy of MIT Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology demonstrated in an animal study that nanoparticles shuttling two different cancer drugs could effectively cross the blood-brain barrier and target tumor cells. The team of scientists evaluated the drug combination in mice that had gliobastoma – an aggressive form of brain cancer that is notoriously hard to treat. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post MIT researchers send drug-ferrying nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - May 29, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Neurological Oncology Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Massachusetts Institute of Technology Source Type: news

NSF CAREER winner Sheereen Majd to improve drug delivery
(University of Houston) The National Science Foundation has awarded University of Houston engineer Sheereen Majd with a Career Award and $500,000 to improve nanoparticle drug delivery, making systems more robust and more precise in targeting their prey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Combination pack battles cancer
(Wiley) For efficient cancer therapy with few side effects, the active drug should selectively attain high concentration in the tumor. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have introduced a new approach, in which two synergistic drug components are combined into a dimer. This dimer can be incorporated into polymeric nanotransporters at exceptionally high concentration. The components are activated when the dimer is split within the tumor. In addition, they enable use of two different imaging techniques. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 29, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Leading the fight against antimicrobial resistance
EU-funded researchers have shown how nanoparticles can deliver drugs directly to the site of an infection. This preclinical research promises more effective treatments and the prospect of bypassing the threat of antimicrobial resistance. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 29, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

NUST MISIS scientists' anticancer drug doubles lifetime of sick animals
(National University of Science and Technology MISIS) A research team from NUST MISIS and Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University has successfully conducted preclinical trials of a new anticancer drug based on magnetite nanoparticles. In the test results, the lifetime of sick mice who were given the drug was doubled. The research results have been published in Nanomedicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Deciphering the language of cells using observation chambers
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) EPFL researchers have developed an innovative label-free method for studying the behavior of single cells continuously and in real time. By placing a cell in a small chamber containing nanosensors and observing it over many hours, it is possible to identify the cell's unique personality and understand how it communicates. This powerful new technology could be used to select the most aggressive cells to combat an enemy. Potential applications include treatments for cancer and autoimmune diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel method to fabricate nanoribbons from speeding nano droplets
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) An international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has discovered a novel method for the synthesis of ultrathin semiconductors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tiny particles could help fight brain cancer
Glioblastoma multiforme, a type of brain tumor, is one of the most difficult-to-treat cancers. Only a handful of drugs are approved to treat glioblastoma, and the median life expectancy for patients diagnosed with the disease is less than 15 months. MIT researchers have now devised a new drug-delivering nanoparticle that could offer a better way to treat glioblastoma. The particles, which carry two different drugs, are designed so that they can easily cross the blood-brain barrier and bind directly to tumor cells. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - May 25, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Polymer crystals hold key to record-breaking energy transport
Scientists from the universities of Bristol and Cambridge have found a way to create polymeric semiconductor nanostructures that absorb light and transport its energy further than previously observed. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry; Press Release Source Type: news

Chameleons are masters of nanotechnology (video)
(American Chemical Society) Chameleons are nature's most talented masters of color. They use their unique color-changing abilities for all sorts of reasons. But how do they alter their hue? They wield a combination of pigments and specialized nano-scale crystals. In this video, Reactions explains how chameleons have mastered nanotech: https://youtu.be/UNj7ngzDHfk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news