New class of membranes shown to regenerate tissue and bone, viable solution for periodontitis
Periodontitis affects nearly half of Americans ages 30 and older, and in its advanced stages, it could lead to early tooth loss or worse. Recent studies have shown that periodontitis could also increase risk of  heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease.A team of UCLA researchers has developed methods that may lead to more effective and reliable therapy for periodontal disease — ones that promote gum tissue and bone regeneration with biological and mechanical features that can be adjusted based on treatment needs. Thestudy is published online in ACS Nano.Periodontitis is a chronic, destructive diseas...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New technique could help regrow tissue lost to periodontal disease
(American Chemical Society) According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about half of all Americans will have periodontal disease at some point in their lives. Characterized by inflamed gums and bone loss around teeth, the condition can cause bad breath, toothache, tender gums and, in severe cases, tooth loss. Now, in ACS Nano, researchers report development of a membrane that helps periodontal tissue regenerate when implanted into the gums of rats. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovery may lead to precision-based strategy for triple negative breast cancer
(Indiana University) A researcher in the Vera Bradley Foundation Center for Breast Cancer Research at the Indiana University School of Medicine, working in collaboration with researchers from the University of Maryland, recently reported several important findings related to triple negative breast cancer and its future treatment in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Micro and nano materials, including clothing for Olympic athletes
(Swansea University) A research team of materials engineers and performance scientists at Swansea University has been awarded £ 1.8 million to develop new products -- in areas from the motor industry to packaging and sport -- that make use of micro and nano materials based on specialist inks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Want in on nanotechnology? Capitalize on collaborative environments
(Waseda University) Patent law experts demonstrate that private-public partnerships lead to promising innovation output measured in patents. Collaborations between private entities and public institutions have the potential to improve technology transfer in nanotechnology. Nations entering the nano-space can capitalize on collaborative environments, developing frameworks and close institutional networks between entities active in nanotechnology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Magnetic stir bars carry 'memory' from previous flasks and tubes
This study shows that in a regular catalysis lab almost all magnetic stir bars become permanently contaminated with metal nanoparticles. Regular cleaning procedures do not remove such contamination completely. Indeed, subsequent release of metal traces in the next reactions is unacceptable even in small quantitates. The results of this study are published in ACS Catalysis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Visualizing better cancer treatment
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) Researchers have engineered nanoscale protein micelles capable of both delivering chemotherapeutic drugs and of being tracked by MRI. The innovation allows researchers to administer therapy while noninvasively monitoring the therapeutic progress and drastically reducing the need for surgical intervention. They biosynthesized a protein block copolymer containing amino acid building blocks with fluorinated thermoresponsive assembled protein (F-TRAP), which assembles into a nanoscale micelle with the noteworthy abilities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Precision-targeted liposomes curb triple-negative breast cancer, metastases in mice
(Boston Children's Hospital) A novel precision medicine strategy described in Science Advances offers an intriguing ray of hope for triple-negative breast cancer. The proof-of-concept study shows that dually-targeted, antibody-guided nanoparticles, loaded with an existing chemotherapy drug, markedly improved tumor targeting, decreased tumor and metastatic growth and dramatically improved survival in a mouse model -- with no observable side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 20, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Wyatt Technology Launches All New Multi-Angle Light Scattering Instruments
Wyatt Technology, the world leader in instrumentation for absolute macromolecular and nanoparticle characterization, announces the launch of its next-generation multi-angle light scattering (MALS),... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Tags: The Scientist The Marketplace Source Type: news

Alcon Powers Up Portfolio Ahead of Novartis Split
It's shaping up to be an interesting year for Alcon, which is expected to split from Novartis to become a standalone Switzerland-based company during the first half of 2019. Alcon just paid $285 million to acquire PowerVision and agreed to additional milestone-based payments starting in 2023. Fort Worth, TX-based PowerVision has been working to create fluid-based intraocular lens implants, but the new IOL technology won't be commercially available until after "significant additional development and clinical trials," Alcon noted. The new lens could prove to be well worth the wait, however, as it is designed to use...
Source: MDDI - March 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Implants Source Type: news

Molecular motors run in unison in a metal-organic framework
(University of Groningen) For molecular motors to be exploited effectively, they need to be able to operate in unison. However, integrating billions of these nanometer-sized motors into a single system, and getting them to operate in unison has proved to be quite a challenge. Organic chemists at the University of Groningen have now succeeded in integrating numerous unidirectional light-driven rotary motors into a metal-organic framework (a solid material with a 3D cage-like structure). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers develop sensor to detect brain disorders in seconds
(University of Central Florida) Using nanotechnology, UCF researchers have developed the first rapid detector for dopamine, a chemical that is believed to play a role in various diseases such as Parkinson's, depression and some cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 18, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Montana State electrical engineering professor wins NSF CAREER grant for brain research
(Montana State University) Anja Kunze will use the more than $500,000 grant to further explore magnetic nanoparticle stimulation of brain neurons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SibFU researchers develop a biosensor enhanced with gold nanoparticles for express diagnostics of stress and toxicological pollution
(Siberian Federal University) A group of researchers is in the process of developing a highly sensitive biosensor designed to detect toxic substances using bioluminescent inhibitory analysis as well as to monitor a biomarker for indicating stress and cancer, namely heat shock proteins 90 (Hsp90). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nanocrystal 'factory' could revolutionize quantum dot manufacturing
(North Carolina State University) A new system for synthesizing quantum dots across the entire spectrum of visible light drastically reduces manufacturing costs, can be tuned on demand to any color and allows for real-time process monitoring to ensure quality control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 15, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Micro-CT detects early tumor growth in lymph nodes
Researchers from Japan were able to detect metastatic tumors in lymph nodes...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Phase-contrast CT captures microscopic details of mummy Micro-CT reveals hawk mummy is actually a human fetus Researchers visualize cardiac conduction system in 3D Just keep scanning: Project builds CT database of fish CT nanoparticle contrast: Good as gold? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 14, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Onkos Surgical to use Promimic ’ s nano-thin HA coating
Onkos Surgical, a surgical oncology device developer, said today that it is working with Promimic AB to commercialize Promimic’s nano-thin hydroxyapatite coating technology for use on limb salvage surgery implants. Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a major component of normal bone and teeth that is already used as a coating on orthopedic implants to promote fixation and bone in-growth. Onkos is developing 3D-printed implants with novel porous structures to facilitate hard and soft tissue attachment. Promimic’s HAnano Surface — applied in a three-step process that creates a nano-thin HA coating — doesn’t ...
Source: Mass Device - March 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News News Well Oncology Orthopedics Onkos Surgical promimic Source Type: news

Defects help nanomaterial soak up more pollutant in less time
(Rice University) Cleaning pollutants from water with a defective filter sounds like a non-starter, but a recent study by chemical engineers at Rice University found that the right-sized defects helped a molecular sieve soak up more perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) in less time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers create nano-bot to probe inside human cells
(University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science& Engineering) U of T Engineering researchers have built a set of magnetic 'tweezers' that can position a nano-scale bead inside a human cell with unprecedented precision. The nano-bot has already been used to study the properties of cancer cells, and could lead to enhanced diagnosis and treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 13, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Are Self-Sterilizing Microneedles Key to Safer Vaccines?
Researchers at the University of South Australia may have found a way to make vaccinations safer. The team developed a microneedle patch loaded with antibacterial silver nanoparticles to provide a sterilization mechanism. "Injections are one of the most common healthcare procedures used for vaccinations and curative care around the world," said Krasimir Vasilev, the lead researcher and a professor at the university's school of engineering. "But up to 40% of injections are given with improperly sterilized syringes and needles, placing millions of people at risk of contracting a range of illnesses or diseases....
Source: MDDI - March 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: R & D Source Type: news

Movie technology inspires wearable liquid unit that aims to harvest energy
(Purdue University) The Purdue team created wearable technology to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. The Purdue team invented a liquid-metal-inclusion based triboelectric nanogenerator, called LMI-TENG. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chad A. Mirkin wins Netherlands Award for Supramolecular Chemistry 2019
(Eindhoven University of Technology) The Netherlands Award for Supramolecular Chemistry is awarded to Chad A. Mirkin. He is the George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences and the director of the International Institute for Nanotechnology at Northwestern. The Netherlands Scholar Award for Supramolecular Chemistry is awarded to professor Helma Wennemers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists Thread A Nano-Needle To Modify The Genes Of Plants
Getting DNA into plant cells is tricky. Researchers have tried using infectious bacteria, as well as gene guns that shoot gold bullets. Then a physicist came up with a new approach almost by accident.(Image credit: Courtesy of Markita del Carpio Landry) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Computer-designed vaccine elicits potent antibodies against RSV
A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine candidate for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been designed in an international research effort. RSV is second only to malaria as a cause of infant mortality worldwide. The new vaccine elicits potent neutralizing antibodies against RSV in both mice and monkeys. The animal research findings, reported March 7 in the journal Cell, pave the way for human clinical trials. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - March 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Computer-Designed Vaccine Elicits Potent Antibodies
A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine candidate for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been designed in an international research effort. RSV is second only to malaria as a cause of infant mortality worldwide. The new vaccine elicits potent neutralizing antibodies against RSV in both mice and monkeys. The animal research findings, reported March 7 in the journal Cell, pave the way for human clinical trials. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - March 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

New gene hunt reveals potential breast cancer treatment target
(University of Queensland) Australian and US researchers have developed a way to discover elusive cancer-promoting genes, already identifying one that appears to promote aggressive breast cancers.The University of Queensland and Albert Einstein College of Medicine team developed a statistical approach to reveal many previously hard-to-find genes that contribute to cancer. UQ Australian Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Associate Professor Jess Mar said the majority of 'oncogenes' identified to date were in most patients with a particular cancer type. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Book Review: Breakdown:  A Clinician ’ s Experience in a  Broken System
There is no such thing as a perfect system and in the case of the mentally ill, nothing could be truer. The mentally ill face an uphill battle to secure appropriate services, avoid being caught up in the criminal justice system, and most of all, steer clear of the revolving door that has become our mental health system. Lynn Nanos, a mobile emergency psychiatric clinician, believes it is time for a change. Her new book, Breakdown: A Clinicians Experience in a Broken System of Emergency Psychiatry, reads like a clarion call to all involved in mental health care in this country. Drawing on her rich experience, Nanos highligh...
Source: Psych Central - March 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Ethics & Morality General Health Insurance Medications Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy Schizophrenia Treatment Violence & Aggression books on mental illnes Source Type: news

Optical imaging finds small tumors
A near-infrared imaging technology may be able to identify small cancers by...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: New nanomaterial may detect Alzheimer's disease earlier Shimadzu launches near-infrared imaging system Novel near-infrared agent could benefit lung nodule surgery fNIRS device connects speech and listening New imaging method helps detect ovarian tumors (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 7, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Computer-designed vaccine elicits potent antibodies against RSV
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine candidate for respiratory syncytial virus, a major cause of infant mortality worldwide, has been developed through computer design. Animal tests suggest the vaccine could provide potent, durable protection against RSV. The vaccine is being further developed for possible clinical trials. The nanoparticle platform will also be used to design potential vaccines for AIDS, hepatitis C and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 7, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Structural basis for pH-dependent retrieval of ER proteins from the Golgi by the KDEL receptor
Selective export and retrieval of proteins between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus is indispensable for eukaryotic cell function. An essential step in the retrieval of ER luminal proteins from the Golgi is the pH-dependent recognition of a carboxyl-terminal Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu (KDEL) signal by the KDEL receptor. Here, we present crystal structures of the chicken KDEL receptor in the apo ER state, KDEL-bound Golgi state, and in complex with an antagonistic synthetic nanobody (sybody). These structures show a transporter-like architecture that undergoes conformational changes upon KDEL binding and reveal a pH-...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Bräuer, P., Parker, J. L., Gerondopoulos, A., Zimmermann, I., Seeger, M. A., Barr, F. A., Newstead, S. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

Exotic states in a simple network of nanoelectromechanical oscillators
Synchronization of oscillators, a phenomenon found in a wide variety of natural and engineered systems, is typically understood through a reduction to a first-order phase model with simplified dynamics. Here, by exploiting the precision and flexibility of nanoelectromechanical systems, we examined the dynamics of a ring of quasi-sinusoidal oscillators at and beyond first order. Beyond first order, we found exotic states of synchronization with highly complex dynamics, including weak chimeras, decoupled states, traveling waves, and inhomogeneous synchronized states. Through theory and experiment, we show that these exotic s...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Matheny, M. H., Emenheiser, J., Fon, W., Chapman, A., Salova, A., Rohden, M., Li, J., Hudoba de Badyn, M., Posfai, M., Duenas-Osorio, L., Mesbahi, M., Crutchfield, J. P., Cross, M. C., DSouza, R. M., Roukes, M. L. Tags: Online Only, Physics r-articles Source Type: news

Coherent single-photon emission from colloidal lead halide perovskite quantum dots
Chemically made colloidal semiconductor quantum dots have long been proposed as scalable and color-tunable single emitters in quantum optics, but they have typically suffered from prohibitively incoherent emission. We now demonstrate that individual colloidal lead halide perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) display highly efficient single-photon emission with optical coherence times as long as 80 picoseconds, an appreciable fraction of their 210-picosecond radiative lifetimes. These measurements suggest that PQDs should be explored as building blocks in sources of indistinguishable single photons and entangled photon pairs. Our ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Utzat, H., Sun, W., Kaplan, A. E. K., Krieg, F., Ginterseder, M., Spokoyny, B., Klein, N. D., Shulenberger, K. E., Perkinson, C. F., Kovalenko, M. V., Bawendi, M. G. Tags: Chemistry, Physics reports Source Type: news

Observation and stabilization of photonic Fock states in a hot radio-frequency resonator
Detecting weak radio-frequency electromagnetic fields plays a crucial role in a wide range of fields, from radio astronomy to nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. In quantum optics, the ultimate limit of a weak field is a single photon. Detecting and manipulating single photons at megahertz frequencies presents a challenge because, even at cryogenic temperatures, thermal fluctuations are appreciable. Using a gigahertz superconducting qubit, we observed the quantization of a megahertz radio-frequency resonator, cooled it to the ground state, and stabilized Fock states. Releasing the resonator from our control, we observed it...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Gely, M. F., Kounalakis, M., Dickel, C., Dalle, J., Vatre, R., Baker, B., Jenkins, M. D., Steele, G. A. Tags: Physics reports Source Type: news

UCLA-led study could point to ways to better control inflammation in autoimmune diseases
In autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis or lupus, the immune system goes into overdrive in response to people ’s own DNA being released from damaged cells — a reaction that can cause severe inflammation in the body.Until now, the molecular processes behind that immune response have not been fully understood by scientists, but a new UCLA-led study could help change that.Researchers at UCLA and three other institutions discovered that LL37 molecules, which are found in the immune system, play an important but unexpected role in revving up the body ’s self-defense response. The finding may bring scientists ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Union rates and reported range of motion are acceptable after open forearm fractures in military combatants - Nappo KE, Hoyt BW, Balazs GC, Nanos GP, Ipsen DF, Tintle SM, Polfer EM.
BACKGROUND: High-energy open forearm fractures are unique injuries frequently complicated by neurovascular and soft tissue injuries. Few studies have evaluated the factors associated with nonunion and loss of motion after these injuries, particularly in th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Single injection gives mammals night vision
By injecting nanoparticles into mice, researchers have found a way to give mammals night vision. The implications are far-reaching. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Eye Health / Blindness Source Type: news

Kidney disease killer vulnerable to targeted nano therapy
(Clemson University) By loading a chelation drug into a nano-sized homing device, researchers at Clemson University have reversed in an animal model the deadliest effects of chronic kidney disease, which kills more people in the United States each year than breast or prostate cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cells use sugars to communicate at the molecular level
(University of Pennsylvania) Research from the University of Pennsylvania reveals how cells communicate at the molecular level. They found that sugar molecules play a key role in cellular communication, serving as the 'channels' that cells and proteins use to talk to one another. This work also provides researchers with a new tool to study other living systems in incredible detail, enabling future breakthroughs in fields from materials science to nanomedicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Safety of nanoparticles under scrutiny
With the growing use of synthetic nanoparticles in consumer and industrial products, EU-funded researchers are examining how they affect organisms including plants, worms and bivalves, laying the foundations for an integrated approach to environmental nano-safety. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - March 1, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Nanoparticles Let Mice See Near Infrared Light
Researchers injected the retinas of mice with nanoparticles that bound to photoreceptors and converted near-infrared light to green light that the animals could see. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 28, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

UMMS scientists develop technology to give night vision to mammals
(University of Massachusetts Medical School) A new study in the journal Cell describes how UMass Medical School biochemist Gang Han, PhD, and colleagues developed technology to give night vision to mammals with a simple injection that contains nanoantennae, allowing the animals to see light beyond the visible spectrum, into the range of infrared light. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Interface and heterostructure design in polyelemental nanoparticles
Nanomaterials that form as heterostructures have applications in catalysis, plasmonics, and electronics. Multielement nanoparticles can now be synthesized through a variety of routes, but how thermodynamic phases form in such structures and how specific interfaces between them can be designed and synthesized are still poorly understood. We explored how palladium-tin alloys form mixed-composition phases with metals with known but complex miscibilities. Nanoparticles with up to seven elements were synthesized, and many form triphase heterostructures consisting of either three-interface or two-interface architectures. Density...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Chen, P.-C., Liu, M., Du, J. S., Meckes, B., Wang, S., Lin, H., Dravid, V. P., Wolverton, C., Mirkin, C. A. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science r-articles Source Type: news

Precipitation strengthening of aluminum alloys by room-temperature cyclic plasticity
High-strength aluminum alloys are important for lightweighting vehicles and are extensively used in aircraft and, increasingly, in automobiles. The highest-strength aluminum alloys require a series of high-temperature "bakes" (120° to 200°C) to form a high number density of nanoparticles by solid-state precipitation. We found that a controlled, room-temperature cyclic deformation is sufficient to continuously inject vacancies into the material and to mediate the dynamic precipitation of a very fine (1- to 2-nanometer) distribution of solute clusters. This results in better material strength and elongation...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sun, W., Zhu, Y., Marceau, R., Wang, L., Zhang, Q., Gao, X., Hutchinson, C. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Phases of multielement nanoparticles
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Now you see heat, now you don't
(American Chemical Society) Hiding an object from heat-sensing cameras could be useful for military and technology applications as well as for research. Efforts to develop such a method have been underway for decades with varying degrees of success. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that they have fabricated an inexpensive, easy-to-produce film that makes objects completely invisible to infrared detectors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Directed evolution builds nanoparticles
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) Directed evolution is a powerful technique for engineering proteins. EPFL scientists now show that it can also be used to engineer synthetic nanoparticles as optical biosensors, which are used widely in biology, drug development, and even medical diagnostics such as real-time monitoring of glucose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 27, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Springer Nature expands its nanotechnology research solution with the inclusion of over 22 million patents
(Springer) A new module has now been added to the nanotechnology research database Nano. The patent module allows users to sort through over 22 million nano-related patents across all major jurisdictions and languages. This means that researchers can find patents from areas highly affected by nanotechnology, narrow their search by country, filing year and jurisdiction, and ultimately demonstrate the scientific and commercial value of their project and its anticipated impact. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Local Researchers Create Patch That Can Fight Cancer
BOSTON (CBS) – Pat Padgett fought a brave battle after a heartbreaking diagnosis. He was young, incredibly fit, but he had oral cancer, and it was terminal. “He kept a sense of humor as long as he could,” said Scott Padgett, Pat’s father. “He fought every day, and he fought to his last breath.” During that battle, Pat, who never smoked, endured a series of difficult surgeries. Pat Padgett (WBZ-TV) “They removed the majority of his tongue,” said Padgett. “It was brutal, and it’s barbaric, and it’s disfiguring.” Patrick’s struggle was the inspirati...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen Boston Next Cancer Treatment Dr. Mallika Marshall oral cancer Source Type: news

Study outlines targeted treatment option for aggressive breast cancer
(University of Maryland) New findings outline a targeted therapeutic strategy to treat triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) -- a potential first for the particularly aggressive form of breast cancer. As demonstrated in the group's paper published today in Nature Nanotechnology, the proposed strategy centers on nanotechnology-based precision-targeting of a gene known as POLR2A. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 25, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

It takes just 6 hours for billions of nanoplastics to accumulate in marine organisms
(Natural News) The next time your dinner plate contains any kind of clam harvested from the sea, you may want to order a plant-based salad instead. A recent British study has shown that scallops and other similar marine bivalve mollusks can get completely contaminated by nano-sized bits of plastics after just a few hours of exposure. The great... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news