DNA robots designed in minutes instead of days
(Ohio State University) Someday, scientists believe, tiny DNA-based robots and other nanodevices will deliver medicine inside our bodies, detect the presence of deadly pathogens, and help manufacture increasingly smaller electronics.Researchers took a big step toward that future by developing a new tool that can design much more complex DNA robots and nanodevices than were ever possible before in a fraction of the time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

MicroMesh: a microscopic polymeric network to attack glioblastoma multiforme
(Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia - IIT) MicroMESH is a new nanomedicine device capable to conform around the surface of tumor masses and efficiently deliver drugs. It is made of micrometric thick polymeric fibers which are very flexible and are arranged to form regular openings, which are also micrometric, just like the size of cancer cells. The new biomedical implant has been validated in preclinical studies that demonstrate its effectiveness for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. Published in Nature Nanotechnology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Ion-capture electrodialysis using multifunctional adsorptive membranes
We report a series of robust, selective, and tunable adsorptive membranes that feature porous aromatic framework nanoparticles embedded within ion exchange polymers and demonstrate their use in an efficient, one-step separation strategy termed ion-capture electrodialysis. This process uses electrodialysis configurations with adsorptive membranes to simultaneously desalinate complex water sources and capture diverse target solutes with negligible capture of competing ions. Our methods are applicable to the development of efficient and selective multifunctional separations that use adsorptive membranes. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Uliana, A. A., Bui, N. T., Kamcev, J., Taylor, M. K., Urban, J. J., Long, J. R. Tags: Chemistry, Engineering reports Source Type: news

Lipid research may help solve COVID-19 vaccine challenges
(University of Texas at Dallas) New research by University of Texas at Dallas scientists could help solve a major challenge in the deployment of certain COVID-19 vaccines worldwide -- the need for the vaccines to be kept at below-freezing temperatures during transport and storage. In a study published online April 13 in Nature Communications, the researchers demonstrate a new, inexpensive technique that generates crystalline exoskeletons around delicate liposomes and other lipid nanoparticles and stabilizes them at room temperature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Self-assembling nanofibers prevent damage from inflammation
(Duke University) Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a self-assembling nanomaterial that can help limit damage caused by inflammatory diseases by activating key cells in the immune system. In mouse models of psoriasis, the team showed that their nanofiber-based drug could effectively mitigate damaging inflammation as effectively as a gold-standard therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Superbug killer: New nanotech destroys bacteria and fungal cells
(RMIT University) A new dual bug killer is one of the thinnest antimicrobial coatings to date.The coating works by tearing bacteria and fungal cells apart, offering a smart solution to the twin global health threats of drug-resistant bacterial and fungal infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AI predicts heart disease risk in DEXA images
A deep-learning algorithm designed to read dual-energy x-ray absorptiometr...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: How well can AI software spot intracranial bleeding on head CT? After hurdles, FDA clears Nanox's digital x-ray system DBT shows potential to assess bone health in women CT lung screening scans also work for bone density Cardiac CT shows promise for osteoporosis screening (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 12, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Sanofi acquires Cambridge mRNA startup for $470M
Sanofi is looking to get into the mRNA game. The French pharmaceutical giant, the parent of Cambridge-based Sanofi Genzyme, has acquired Tidal Therapeutics, a startup developing nanoparticles that deliver genetic instructions to reprogram immune cells with messenger RNA, or mRNA. Even though Tidal is still in the preclinical stage and does n ot yet have a website, Sanofi paid $160 million up front for the startup, with up to $310 million more in milestone payments. Founded in 2019, Tidal is a resident… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 12, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Rowan Walrath Source Type: news

GreenMark Secures FDA Clearance for LumiCare â„¢ Caries Detection Rinse
GreenMark Secures FDA Clearance for LumiCare ™ Caries Detection RinseEnhanced Visualization of Dental Caries is the First Commercial Application of Startup Venture's Nanotechnology PlatformEast Lansing& Ann Arbor, MI, April 8, 2021–GreenMark Biomedical Inc. announced that the company has secured regulatory clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its LumiCare ™ Caries Detection Rinse as a 510(k) Class II Medical Device. " Gaining FDA clearance for our LumiCare ™ device at this particular time is especially gratifying given the significant pandemic challenges of t...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - April 9, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

A new agent for the brain diseases: mRNA
(Tokyo Medical and Dental University) Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers prepared a nanomicelle delivery system to transport BDNF mRNA to the site of ischemic injury. The nanomicelle successfully produced BDNF and prevented the death of neurons when dosed 2 days after ischemia in rats. Long-term experiments showed significant improvements in memory compared with untreated rats. The findings are expected to extend the potential treatment window for preventing neuronal death after ischemic attack, and significantly improve outcomes for patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mechanism and dynamics of fatty acid photodecarboxylase
Fatty acid photodecarboxylase (FAP) is a photoenzyme with potential green chemistry applications. By combining static, time-resolved, and cryotrapping spectroscopy and crystallography as well as computation, we characterized Chlorella variabilis FAP reaction intermediates on time scales from subpicoseconds to milliseconds. High-resolution crystal structures from synchrotron and free electron laser x-ray sources highlighted an unusual bent shape of the oxidized flavin chromophore. We demonstrate that decarboxylation occurs directly upon reduction of the excited flavin by the fatty acid substrate. Along with flavin reoxidati...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sorigue, D., Hadjidemetriou, K., Blangy, S., Gotthard, G., Bonvalet, A., Coquelle, N., Samire, P., Aleksandrov, A., Antonucci, L., Benachir, A., Boutet, S., Byrdin, M., Cammarata, M., Carbajo, S., Cuine, S., Doak, R. B., Foucar, L., Gorel, A., Grü Tags: Biochemistry, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

High-throughput injection molding of transparent fused silica glass
We present a process for glassworks using high-throughput IM of an amorphous silicon dioxide nanocomposite that combines established process technologies and low-energy sintering. We produce highly transparent glass using classical IM and sintering, allowing for a potentially substantial reduction in energy consumption. Our strategy merges polymer and glass processing, with substantial implications for glass utilization. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Mader, M., Schlatter, O., Heck, B., Warmbold, A., Dorn, A., Zappe, H., Risch, P., Helmer, D., Kotz, F., Rapp, B. E. Tags: Engineering, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

For highly active, sustainable catalysts, just add phosphorus
(Osaka University) Osaka University researchers have developed a single-crystal cobalt phosphide nanorod catalyst for the reductive amination of carbonyl compounds to primary amines. The nanorod catalyst performed better than conventional catalysts, was stable in air, and was effective under mild conditions. Additionally, it could be reused multiple times without loss of activity. It is hoped that the nanorod catalyst will provide a green and sustainable alternative for the synthesis of valuable products such as pharmaceuticals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 7, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nanoconfinement concept improves safety of diagnostic contrast agent
The Yale-led research team found that when packaged in a nanoparticle, CT contrast agents, such as iodine, increased the absorption of X-rays. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 6, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

nanoMesh(TM) LLC (a subsidiary of Exogenesis Corporation) Announces Completion Filing of a Second Pre-Marketing Notification Application (510(k)) with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Innovative Soft Tissue Repair Implant Possesses a Unique Nanometer-level Surface Texture BILLERICA, Mass., April 6, 2021 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- nanoMesh™ LLC, a subsidiary of Exogenesis Corporation, announced today that it has suc... Devices, Surgery, FDA Exogenesis, nanoMesh, hernia repair (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - April 6, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Tattoo made of gold nanoparticles revolutionizes medical diagnostics
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) Scientists have developed a novel type of implantable sensor that continuously transmits information on vital values and concentrations of substances or drugs in the body and can be operated in the body for several months. The sensor is based on color-stable gold nanoparticles that are modified with receptors for specific molecules. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

< a href= " /news-events/nih-research-matters/nanoparticle-based-flu-vaccine " > Nanoparticle-based flu vaccine < /a >
A nanoparticle-based vaccine protected against a broad range of flu virus strains in animals. The vaccine may prevent flu more effectively than current vaccines. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Towards global flood mapping onboard low cost satellites with machine learning - Mateo-Garcia G, Veitch-Michaelis J, Smith L, Oprea SV, Schumann G, Gal Y, Baydin AG, Backes D.
Spaceborne Earth observation is a key technology for flood response, offering valuable information to decision makers on the ground. Very large constellations of small, nano satellites- 'CubeSats' are a promising solution to reduce revisit time in disaster... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

UMass Amherst team discovers use of elasticity to position microplates on curved 2D fluids
(University of Massachusetts Amherst) A team of polymer science and engineering researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has demonstrated for the first time that the positions of tiny, flat, solid objects integrated in nanometrically thin membranes - resembling those of biological cells - can be controlled by mechanically varying the elastic forces in the membrane itself. This research milestone is a significant step toward the goal of creating ultrathin flexible materials that self-organize and respond immediately to mechanical force. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 5, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Phase 1 clinical trial of WRAIR-developed COVID-19 vaccine begins
(Walter Reed Army Institute of Research) A unique vaccine to protect against COVID-19 begins clinical testing Tuesday, 6 April, at WRAIR. Scientists developed a nanoparticle vaccine, based on a ferritin platform, which offers a flexible approach to targeting multiple variants of SARS-COV-2 and potentially other coronaviruses as well. This platform is the next generation vaccine, one that paves the way for a universal vaccine to protect against not only the current virus, but also counter future variants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 5, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

DNA methylation from bacteria & mircobiome using nanopore technology discovered
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Researchers discover multiple types of DNA methylation from bacteria and microbiome using nanopore technology, opening new opportunities to discover novel drug targets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 5, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

After hurdles, FDA clears Nanox's digital x-ray system
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared x-ray developer Nanox'...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Nanox speeds up construction of fabrication plant Nanox announces secondary share offering FDA asks Nanox for more info on x-ray system Nanox hires 3 key senior executives Nanox, USARad plan AI-powered radiology service (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 2, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Digital X-ray company Nanox scores first FDA clearance
The company landed a 510(k) for its single-source digital X-ray Nanox.ARC, and said more clearances are in the pipeline.   (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - April 2, 2021 Category: Information Technology Tags: Digital Health, Regulation, Technology, Public Policy Source Type: news

Designed proteins assemble antibodies into modular nanocages
Multivalent display of receptor-engaging antibodies or ligands can enhance their activity. Instead of achieving multivalency by attachment to preexisting scaffolds, here we unite form and function by the computational design of nanocages in which one structural component is an antibody or Fc-ligand fusion and the second is a designed antibody-binding homo-oligomer that drives nanocage assembly. Structures of eight nanocages determined by electron microscopy spanning dihedral, tetrahedral, octahedral, and icosahedral architectures with 2, 6, 12, and 30 antibodies per nanocage, respectively, closely match the corresponding c...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Divine, R., Dang, H. V., Ueda, G., Fallas, J. A., Vulovic, I., Sheffler, W., Saini, S., Zhao, Y. T., Raj, I. X., Morawski, P. A., Jennewein, M. F., Homad, L. J., Wan, Y.-H., Tooley, M. R., Seeger, F., Etemadi, A., Fahning, M. L., Lazarovits, J., Roederer, Tags: Biochemistry, Materials Science, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Creation of 3D organoid models to fine-tune radiation dose for nasopharyngeal cancer
(Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore) A*STAR's Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) has teamed up with the Singapore Institute of Advanced Medicine Holdings Pte Ltd (SIAMH) to establish the first of its kind in-vitro patient-derived 3D organoid models of Nasopharyngeal Cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 31, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

From dinner to sustainable electronics, the surprising versatility of crabs
(Osaka University) Osaka University researchers have developed 3D porous nanocarbon materials through the pyrolysis of chitin nanofiber papers derived from crab shells. The properties of the pyrolyzed chitin nanofiber papers could be controlled using the pyrolysis temperature, and the materials were successfully used as photosensors, as well as supercapacitor electrodes for energy storage. It is hoped that the high performance achieved using the renewable raw material will highlight the viability of sustainable electronics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 31, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Oxford Nanopore float offers London a proper tech future
Planned IPO of life science group will test LSE ’s appetite for funding high-growth techOxford Nanopore to float on London Stock ExchangeAnother day, another tech float on the way for London. This one involves proper technology too: cutting-edge DNA sequencing and analytics, as opposed to takeaway food delivered by bicycle.Oxford Nanopore ’s likely arrival on the London Stock Exchange later this year is therefore very welcome. The UK market is short on life sciences companies capable of commanding multibillion-pound valuations.Let ’s not pretend, though, that the choice of London is some sort of national ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 30, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nils Pratley Tags: Technology sector Business Biometrics Nanotechnology Science Deliveroo IPOs Stock markets Coronavirus Industrial policy Steel industry Kwasi Kwarteng Politics University of Oxford Technology startups Source Type: news

New technology could replace Pap smear in cervical cancer screening, researchers say
New nanotechnologies and machine learning approaches may replace the Pap smear as the primary method for cervical cancer screening because they can accurately identify women with the disease, according to a new analysis. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Oxford Nanopore picks London for latest tech IPO
DNA sequencing group expected to be valued at £4bn to £7bn in one of largest UK floats this year (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - March 30, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Cervical cancer testing tech could replace pap smears, save lives
(American Institute of Physics) Emerging technologies can screen for cervical cancer better than Pap smears and, if widely used, could save lives in areas where access to health care may be limited. In Biophysics Reviews, scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital write advances in nanotechnology and computer learning are among the technologies helping develop HPV screening that take the guesswork out of the precancer tests. That could mean better screening in places that lack highly trained doctors and advanced laboratories. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 30, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase B promotes Ca2+ mobilization and the inflammatory activity of dendritic cells
Innate immune responses to Gram-negative bacteria depend on the recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by a receptor complex that includes CD14 and TLR4. In dendritic cells (DCs), CD14 enhances the activation not only of TLR4 but also that of the NFAT family of transcription factors, which suppresses cell survival and promotes the production of inflammatory mediators. NFAT activation requires Ca2+ mobilization. In DCs, Ca2+ mobilization in response to LPS depends on phospholipase C 2 (PLC2), which produces inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). Here, we showed that the IP3 receptor 3 (IP3R3) and ITPKB, a kinase that converts...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - March 30, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Marongiu, L., Mingozzi, F., Cigni, C., Marzi, R., Di Gioia, M., Garre, M., Parazzoli, D., Sironi, L., Collini, M., Sakaguchi, R., Morii, T., Crosti, M., Moro, M., Schurmans, S., Catelani, T., Rotem, R., Colombo, M., Shears, S., Prosperi, D., Zanoni, I., G Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

"Forever" diamond battery takes up to 28,000 years to run out of charge
(Natural News) California startup Nano Diamond Battery (NDB) says it has designed a battery made from nuclear waste that will take up to 28,000 years to run out of charge. The “forever” diamond battery was developed for use in deep space and other niche applications, but a consumer-facing prototype is also in the works. The firm said that the latter model will be able to last for nine consecutive... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New UCF nanotech gives boost to detection of cancer and disease
(University of Central Florida) Early screening can mean the difference between life and death in a cancer and disease diagnosis. That's why University of Central Florida researchers are working to develop a new screening technique that's more than 300 times as effective at detecting a biomarker for diseases like cancer than current methods. The technique was detailed recently in the Journal of the American Chemical Society and uses nanoparticles to increase the sensitivity of ELISA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 25, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Nanorod alignment for optical asymmetry
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Enhanced optical asymmetry in supramolecular chiroplasmonic assemblies with long-range order
Chiral assemblies of plasmonic nanoparticles are known for strong circular dichroism but not for high optical asymmetry, which is limited by the unfavorable combination of electrical and magnetic field components compounded by strong scattering. Here, we show that these limitations can be overcome by the long-range organization of nanoparticles in a manner similar to the liquid crystals and found in helical assemblies of gold nanorods with human islet amyloid polypeptides. A strong, polarization-dependent spectral shift and the reduced scattering of energy states with antiparallel orientation of dipoles activated in assemb...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Lu, J., Xue, Y., Bernardino, K., Zhang, N.-N., Gomes, W. R., Ramesar, N. S., Liu, S., Hu, Z., Sun, T., de Moura, A. F., Kotov, N. A., Liu, K. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Stabilizing black-phase formamidinium perovskite formation at room temperature and high humidity
The stabilization of black-phase formamidinium lead iodide (α-FAPbI3) perovskite under various environmental conditions is considered necessary for solar cells. However, challenges remain regarding the temperature sensitivity of α-FAPbI3 and the requirements for strict humidity control in its processing. Here we report the synthesis of stable α-FAPbI3, regardless of humidity and temperature, based on a vertically aligned lead iodide thin film grown from an ionic liquid, methylamine formate. The vertically grown structure has numerous nanometer-scale ion channels that facilitate the permeation of formamidi...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hui, W., Chao, L., Lu, H., Xia, F., Wei, Q., Su, Z., Niu, T., Tao, L., Du, B., Li, D., Wang, Y., Dong, H., Zuo, S., Li, B., Shi, W., Ran, X., Li, P., Zhang, H., Wu, Z., Ran, C., Song, L., Xing, G., Gao, X., Zhang, J., Xia, Y., Chen, Y., Huang, W. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Three-dimensional vectorial imaging of surface phonon polaritons
Surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) are coupled photon-phonon excitations that emerge at the surfaces of nanostructured materials. Although they strongly influence the optical and thermal behavior of nanomaterials, no technique has been able to reveal the complete three-dimensional (3D) vectorial picture of their electromagnetic density of states. Using a highly monochromated electron beam in a scanning transmission electron microscope, we could visualize varying SPhP signatures from nanoscale MgO cubes as a function of the beam position, energy loss, and tilt angle. The SPhPs’ response was described in terms of eigenm...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Li, X., Haberfehlner, G., Hohenester, U., Stephan, O., Kothleitner, G., Kociak, M. Tags: Physics reports Source Type: news

Mapping nanostructure surface excitations
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Osborne, I. S. Tags: Physics twis Source Type: news

Potential COVID-19 treatment identified in UCLA-led lab study
This study identified a new potential therapy that could help the global fight against COVID-19 and support populations that have been disproportionately affected by this deadly disease.”Drugs are categorized as small molecules when their individual molecules are tiny enough that they can penetrate to where they are needed. The researchers screened 430 drugs from among the approximately 200,000 compounds in CNSI ’sMolecular Screening Shared Resource libraries. They identified 34  that demonstrated at least some ability to halt the coronavirus, and eight that did so at relatively lower doses, before zeroing...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 24, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Do you know the way to Berkelium, Californium?
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Scientists at Berkeley Lab have demonstrated how to image samples of heavy elements as small as a single nanogram. The new approach will help scientists advance new technologies for medical imaging and cancer therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 24, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Small robot swimmers that heal themselves from damage (video)
(American Chemical Society) Living tissue can heal itself from many injuries, but giving similar abilities to artificial systems, such as robots, has been extremely challenging. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have developed small, swimming robots that can magnetically heal themselves on-the-fly after breaking into two or three pieces. The strategy could someday be used to make hardier devices for environmental or industrial clean up, the researchers say. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nanoparticle flu vaccine blocks seasonal and pandemic strains
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) Experimental flu shots have now been developed that protect animals from a wide variety of season and pandemic influenza strains. The vaccine candidate is being advanced toward clinical testing. If proven safe and effective, these next-generation influenza vaccines could replace seasonal options by protecting against more strains that current vaccines don't adequately cover. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 24, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Copper foam as a highly efficient, durable filter for reusable masks and air cleaners
(American Chemical Society) During the COVID-19 pandemic, people have grown accustomed to wearing facemasks, but many coverings are fragile and not easily disinfected. Metal foams are durable, and their small pores and large surface areas suggest they could effectively filter out microbes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS'Nano Letters have transformed copper nanowires into metal foams that could be used in facemasks and air filtration systems. The foams filter efficiently, decontaminate easily for reuse and are recyclable. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 24, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Deactivating cancer cell gene boosts immunotherapy for head and neck cancers
By targeting an enzyme that plays a key role in head and neck cancer cells, researchers from theUCLA School of Dentistry were able to significantly slow the growth and spread of tumors in mice and enhance the effectiveness of an immunotherapy to which these types of cancers often become resistant.Their findings,  published online in the journal Molecular Cell, could help researchers develop more refined approaches to combatting highly invasive head and neck squamous cell cancers, which primarily affect the mouth, nose and throat.Immunotherapy, which is used as a clinical treatment for various cancers, harnesses t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 23, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Sirtex launches study to assess SIR-Spheres for HCC
Radiation oncology firm Sirtex Medical said it has received U.S. Food and Dru...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: U.K.'s NICE recommends Sirtex's microsphere for liver cancer Sirtex invests in BlackSwan Vascular Sirtex signs new executive VP of international sales Sirtex invests in Nanospectra Biosciences Sirtex hits milestone in China for yttrium-90 microspheres (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 22, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

A sense for the unseen: Novel DNA sensor can rapidly detect antibiotic-resistant pathogens
(University of Fukui) The persistent overuse of antibiotics has led to the evolution of antibiotic resistant pathogens, or " superbugs, " which can cause severe life-threatening infections that must be diagnosed and treated early on. However, antibiotic sensitivity assays used to detect resistance rely on cell culture that can take several days. Overcoming this limitation, researchers have now designed a novel self-driven DNA nanosensor that can rapidly detect methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a lethal superbug, with high sensitivity and specificity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 22, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Planting the seed for DNA nanoconstructs that grow to the micron scale
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Nanobiotechnologists at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have devised a programmable DNA self-assembly strategy that solves the key challenge of robust nucleation control and paves the way for applications such as ultrasensitive diagnostic biomarker detection and scalable fabrication of micrometer-sized structures with nanometer-sized features. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nanobiomaterial boosts neuronal growth in mice with spinal cord injuries
(Department of Orthopedics, Tongji Hospital of Tongji University) A nanobiomaterial called layered double hydroxide (LDH) has been shown to inhibit the inflammatory environment surrounding spinal cord injuries in mice, accelerating regeneration of neurons. An understanding of the process could allow development of a comprehensive therapeutic system for spinal cord injuries in people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Plastic 'nanoparticles' can pass from pregnant mothers to fetuses, rat study shows
The new study, done by Rutgers University scientists, is the first to show that the particles can not only get lodged in the placenta, but can pass through this sac, to the developing fetus. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Advancement creates nanosized, foldable robots
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Army-funded researchers created nanosized robots that could enable locomotion, novel metamaterial design and high-fidelity sensors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news