World No Tobacco Day 2016

31 May is World No Tobacco Day. It is organized by the World Health Organization to draw attention to the health risks associated with the use of tobacco and what can still be done to reduce tobacco consumption around the world.Here we focus on a Cochrane Review of a medical intervention - nicotine receptor partial agonists for smoking cessation - and what the available evidence tells us about its effectiveness. Cochrane Review provides more support for medication as long-term aid to quitting smokingWhen people stop smoking, they experience cravings to smoke and unpleasant mood changes. Nicotine receptor partial agonists aim to reduce these withdrawal symptoms and the pleasure people usually experience when they smoke. The most widely available treatment in this drug type is varenicline, which is available worldwide as an aid for quitting smoking. Cytisine is a similar medication, but is only available in Central and Eastern European countries, and through internet sales.A team of Cochrane authors based in the UK, working with the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group, updated their review of the efficacy of nicotine receptor partial agonists, including varenicline and cytisine, for smoking cessation. Findings take from 44 studies, which include 25,200 people.Varenicline at standard dose more than doubled the chances of quitting compared with placebo. Low-dose varenicline roughly doubled the chances of quitting, and reduced the number and severity of side effects associated with u...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news

Related Links:

Let’s get candid about male mental health. Men don’t get a lot of compassion — not as a gender, not toward one another, and not toward ourselves. We are the more impulsive, less refined gender that has not progressed much since our cave-dwelling days. We’ve learned to use a salad fork since then, however, and we pretend to enjoy chivalry. Sadly — and perhaps due to our ruffian status — men are often perceived as an expendable lot, regularly sent to do life’s dirty work like unclogging municipal sewers, diffusing IEDs, repossessing tractors, or mining for coal and ore miles below E...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Anxiety Career Depression Men's Issues Personal Stories Sleep Stress Suicide Source Type: news
In a May 14  blog post, Food and Drug Commissioner Scott Gottlieb expressed concern about the effect the  nation ’s restrictive policy towards the manufacture and prescription of opioids is having on patients with chronic pain conditions. This is one of the first signs that someone in the administration has taken note of the unintended consequences of this misguided policy—a policy that is based upon the false narrative that the overdose crisis is primarily the result of doctors prescribing opioids to patients in pain.In response to a wide range of public input solicited by th...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Okun (2012).New England Journal of Medicine.Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus inParkinson's disease (PD) has been highly successful in controlling the motor symptoms of this disorder, which include tremor, slowed movement (akinesia), and muscle stiffness or rigidity. The figure above shows the electrode implantation procedure for PD, where a stimulating electrode is placed in either thesubthalamic nucleus, (STN), a tiny collection of neurons within the basal ganglia circuit, or in the internal segment of theglobus pallidus, another structure in the basal ganglia (Okun, 2012). DBS of the STN is more co...
Source: The Neurocritic - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Source Type: blogs
The men file in, a few wearing pressed button-down shirts, others jeans caked in mud from work on a construction site. They meet in the living room of an old taupe bungalow on a leafy street in a small Southern city. Someone has shoved a workout bike into the corner to make room for a circle of overstuffed chairs dug up at the local Goodwill. The men jockey for a coveted recliner and settle in. They are complaining about co-workers and debating the relative merits of various trucks when a faint beeping interrupts the conversation. One man picks up a throw pillow and tries to muffle the sound of the battery running low on h...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized nation sex offender therapy Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Individuals engaging in NSSI are at increased risk for suicide, and common heritable factors contribute to these associations. Preventing trauma exposure may help to mitigate risk for self-harm and suicide, either directly or indirectly via reductions in liability to psychopathology more broadly. In addition, targeting pre-existing vulnerability factors could significantly reduce risk for life-threatening behaviors among those who have experienced trauma. PMID: 29729685 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Psychological Medicine - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Psychol Med Source Type: research
(Centre for Addiction and Mental Health) A specific kind of brain stimulation is effective in reducing suicidal thinking in a significant portion of people with hard-to-treat depression, according to a new CAMH study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. Forty per cent of people in the study reported that they no longer experienced suicidal thoughts after receiving bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Authors: Bjerregaard P, Larsen CVL Abstract Greenland is a country in transition from a colonial past with subsistence hunting and fishing to an urban Nordic welfare state. Epidemiological transition from infectious to chronic diseases has been evident since the 1950s. Ninety percent of the population is Inuit. We studied three public health issues based on published literature, namely adverse childhood experiences, addictive behavior, and suicide; diet and obesity; and smoking. Alcohol consumption was high in the 1970s and 1980s with accompanying family and social disruption. This is still a cause of poor mental h...
Source: Public Health Reviews - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Rev Source Type: research
This study explo...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Men's mental health should be recognized as a social issue as much as a medical issue, with special attention paid to problems such as unemployment, familial disruption, and substance abuse. These problems, and especially those of major societal impact including violence and suicide which are much more frequently the product of male youth and men, should have more male-tailored options for service provision that respond to men's mental health needs. PMID: 29679360 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: World Journal of Pediatrics : WJP - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: World J Pediatr Source Type: research
Authors: Kabir SMS Abstract The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the deleterious effects of climate change on psychological health of the Hill-Tracts and government to deal with these adverse psychological health impacts. Although knowledge is still limited about the connections between climate change and psychological health, the evidence is indicating that impacts can be felt at both the individual and community levels, with psychological health outcomes ranging from psychological distress, depression, and anxiety, to increased addictions and suicide rates. Drawing from 125 in-depth interviews condu...
Source: Asian Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Asian J Psychiatr Source Type: research
More News: Addiction | Bupropion | Cardiology | Chantix | Depression | Health | Heart | Information Technology | International Medicine & Public Health | Internet | Nicotine | Nicotine Replacement Therapy | Psychiatry | Smokers | Study | Suicide | Warnings | Wellbutrin | WHO