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No tricks — only treats and happy times for sick kids hospitalized at UCLA

If laughter is the best medicine, then kids staying at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA got a healthy dose of it today during a Halloween celebration filled with giggles and smiles. For 6-year-old patient Abby Karr, Halloween couldn’t come soon enough. She had been planning her transformation into a pink, bedazzled Batgirl all week long, said her mother Megan Karr. Abby, who suffers from a heart and lung condition and has been hospitalized on and off since she was 16 months old, couldn't wait for today to arrive. Without ever leaving the hospital, she saw it all: Star Wars characters, super heroes, kitten outfits galore and costumed dogs, patiently wearing their Halloween finery. Keeping Abby company were other patients and their families who didn’t have to miss out on the fun. Reed Hutchinson/UCLA Ten-month-old Norah Booth, who is recovering from a liver transplant, was celebrating her first Halloween as Super Girl. Dressed up in Halloween costumes donated by Spirit Halloween stores and selected at a “boutique” held earlier, kids trailed by happy parents went trick-or-treating through the hospital hallways and main lobby after being treated to a magic show. Everyone got into the spirit with help from child life specialists, nurses, hospital volunteers, community organizations and nearly 70 campus departments and groups from UCLA Health and the UCLA campus. They handed out goodies at stations along corridors and the main hospital lobby wher...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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In conclusion, a debate exists on whether aging is a disease in itself. Some authors suggest that physiological aging (or senescence) is not really distinguishable from pathology, while others argue that aging is different from age-related diseases and other pathologies. It is interesting to stress that the answer to this question has important theoretical and practical consequences, taking into account that various strategies capable of setting back the aging clock are emerging. The most relevant consequence is that, if we agree that aging is equal to disease, all human beings have to be considered as patients to be treat...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined associations between mortality and accelerometer-measured PA using age-relevant intensity cutpoints in older women of various ethnicities. The results support the hypothesis that higher levels of accelerometer-measured PA, even when below the moderate-intensity threshold recommended in current guidelines, are associated with lower all-cause and CVD mortality in women aged 63 to 99. Our findings expand on previous studies showing that higher self-reported PA reduces mortality in adults aged 60 and older, specifically in older women, and at less than recommended amounts. Moreover, our findings challenge th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study cohort is a healthy subset of the EpiPath cohort, excluding all participants with acute or chronic diseases. With a mediation analysis we examined whether CMV titers may account for immunosenescence observed in ELA. In this study, we have shown that ELA is associated with higher levels of T cell senescence in healthy participants. Not only did we find a higher number of senescent cells (CD57+), these cells also expressed higher levels of CD57, a cell surface marker for senescence, and were more cytotoxic in ELA compared to controls. Control participants with high CMV titers showed a higher number of senes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Charlie Gard was a one-year-old boy who had a rare genetic disease leaving him blind, comatose, and unable to breathe on his own. This metabolic disorder can be fatal and has no known cure. Charlie’s parents wanted him treated with experimental drugs in the hope that a miracle would happen. As reported in the press, the British medical and legal community considered this care futile and blocked it. This sad story created a flurry of public discussion about ethics, end of life care, and patient and parent autonomy. Experts debated the wisdom of the parents’ decision. The discussion centered on whether ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Physician Critical Care Neurology Palliative Care Pediatrics Source Type: blogs
Amanda Mattioli was working in Afghanistan as a government contractor and had just completed a whirlwind round of travel to three separate continents when she learned she was pregnant. The helicopter unit that took her back to the main base so she could return home for her pregnancy gave her a unit sticker to commemorate her baby’s first helicopter ride. Little did she know it would also mark the beginning of a much longer journey for her and her son, William “Jayce” James. Amanda got her first hint the ride would be bumpy at her 20-week ultrasound, when she learned Jayce’s heart was on the right si...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories atrioventricular canal Biventricular Repair Biventricular Repair Program Dr. Gerald Marx Dr. Pedro del Nido Heterotaxy syndrome Pulmonary atresia transposition of the great arteries Source Type: news
Treatment TermsChildren's health CategoriesClinical trialsFamily health TagsPatient story Sub-Title Baby Collier Proves He ’s a Survivor Author Burgetta Wheeler Overview Collier Hart sat smiling in his crib repeatedly saying, “Wa wa.” Given a sippy cup of water, he threw back his head and drained it. He put his hands together, fingertips touching, and made the sign for “more.” None of this is unusual for a 2-year-old, but it is for Collier. He spent the first 15 months of his life at Duke Children’s Hospital af ter being born with severely underdeveloped lungs. Hero Imageco...
Source: dukehealth.org: Health Tips - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: news
This study identified 1,497 genes with significantly different expression at different ages. Gene sets with a defined age-associated expression pattern provide information about molecular processes with altered activity during aging and provide a valuable diagnostic tool for determining individual biological rate of aging and predicting risk of age-associated disease, as demonstrated in follow-up analyses. On a gene-by-gene basis, differential expression alone is insufficient to distinguish between genes that play a causative role in aging and genes that merely respond to the altered physiological environment in an aging o...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
3D printing has demonstrated huge potential for the future of medicine in the previous years, and its development is unstoppable. Just look at the impressive list of 3D printed healthcare materials and medical equipment below! How does 3D printing work? 3D printing is part of the innovative process called additive manufacturing, which means the production of three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. The printer uses a kind of layering process, by which one layer is added after the other until you have a fully formed object. It allows designers and engineers to create complex parts for cars, machines or air...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: 3D Printing in Medicine Future of Medicine 3d printed biomaterial bioprinting GC1 Health Healthcare Innovation medical technology tissue engineering Video Source Type: blogs
3D printing has demonstrated huge potential for the future of medicine in the previous years, and its development is unstoppable. Just look at the impressive list of 3D printed healthcare materials and medical equipment below! How does 3D printing work? 3D printing is part of the innovative process called additive manufacturing, which means the production of three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. The printer uses a kind of layering process, by which one layer is added after the other until you have a fully formed object. It allows designers and engineers to create complex parts for cars, machines or air...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: 3D Printing in Medicine Future of Medicine 3d printed biomaterial bioprinting GC1 Health Healthcare Innovation medical technology tissue engineering Video Source Type: blogs
BY JOHN IRVINE We asked THCB’s editors and bloggers for their reactions to Friday’s news. Here are their reactions. DANIEL STONE, MD The late UCLA Professor Richard Brown, once commented that the Clinton healthcare initiative failed because the status quo was everyone’s second choice. Some of that logic applies to today’s failure to vote on the AHCA. Additionally, no one ever lost money betting against the rollback of an established entitlement program. The Republicans opponents of the ACA have not yet faced the fact that the reason coverage is so expensive is because the care is so expensive. You ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized John Irvine Source Type: blogs
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