Consumer Health: Fasting may be good for your heart
Fasting and heart health? Researchers aren't sure why, but it seems that regularly fasting potentially can reduce your risk of heart disease. However, there are concerns about the potential side effects of fasting for certain people or in specific circumstances. Learn more from?Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. *** Also in today's tips ... [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - February 8, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Living With Cancer: 7 steps to reduce your risk of cancer
Cancer prevention: 7 tips to reduce your risk? February is National Cancer Prevention Month, which makes it a good time to learn about what you can do to reduce your risk of developing cancer. In many cases, what is known about cancer prevention is still evolving, so it may seem the advice keeps changing. However, [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - February 8, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Using Real World Evidence to Build Dynamic Cohorts in Real-Time, New...
In this free webinar, learn how a next-generation semantic operational data hub can be used to build dynamic cohorts in real-time using all forms of real world data – significantly shortening the time...(PRWeb February 08, 2019)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/using_real_world_evidence_to_build_dynamic_cohorts_in_real_time_new_webinar_hosted_by_xtalks/prweb16089507.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - February 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Most biomedical studies fail to report if results differ by sex
Gender bias concern as analysis shows differences in how sexes respond to drugs overlookedNearly three-quarters of biomedical studies fail to report whether outcomes differ for men and women, according to a study which raises concerns about gender bias.Analysis of more than 11.5m medical research papers published between 1980 and 2016 found a majority overlooked the role of sex differences in genetics, physiology and the way the body responds to drugs.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Drugs Health Science Gender Society Education Medicine UK news Source Type: news

Higher Education May Not Protect People From Dementia
BOSTON (CBS) – Graduating from college may not protect you from dementia. That’s according to a new study in the journal Neurology. Previous research suggested that spending more time in school might protect a person from dementia by creating a cognitive buffer against mental decline, but researchers at Rush University looked at almost 3,000 people and found that while having a higher level of education was associated with more advanced thinking and memory skills in general, it did not affect when a person developed dementia or how quickly it progressed. That said, they say formal education usually stops long b...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dementia Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

What Do You Need For Marathon Training?
“People who say running is a cheap sport have never run 26.2 miles.” (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

These Portland metro schools have the highest rates of unvaccinated students
Oregon has the dubious distinction of having the highest percentage of kindergartners skipping vaccinations for nonmedical reasons in the country, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For the 2017-18 school year, Oregon's rate of nonmedical exemptions was 7.5 percent vs. a U.S. median of 2 percent. OHA monitors exemption rates and makes the data available to local public health officials, schools, day care facilities and parents, said Stacy de Assis Matthews, immunization… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 7, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

These Portland metro schools have the highest rates of unvaccinated students
Oregon has the dubious distinction of having the highest percentage of kindergartners skipping vaccinations for nonmedical reasons in the country, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For the 2017-18 school year, Oregon's rate of nonmedical exemptions was 7.5 percent vs. a U.S. median of 2 percent. OHA monitors exemption rates and makes the data available to local public health officials, schools, day care facilities and parents, said Stacy de Assis Matthews, immunization… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 7, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Vector Solutions Strengthens Mobile Workforce Management Capabilities with Acquisition of Halligan
Vector Solutions, the leader in industry-focused eLearning and performance support solutions, has acquired Halligan, the innovative developers of a leading mobile application for public safety agencies that streamlines routine maintenance inspections of trucks, tools, medical supplies, drugs, and other items logged in inventory records. The addition of Halligan comes on the heels of Vector’s recent acquisition of CrewSense, reaffirming Vector’s commitment to providing a single operational hub for clients and expanding its eLearning and training platform into a complete performance optimization solution. Halliga...
Source: JEMS Operations - February 7, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Operations Press Releases Source Type: news

UR Medicine, Community Pediatricians Team Up to Encourage Vaccinations
In the wake of the measles cases that have arisen in the Rochester area over the past several weeks, pediatricians throughout the region have collaborated on a video in the hopes of spreading awareness about the benefits of vaccination. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - February 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

In seminar, Tom Lynch talks drug development and improving patient outcomes
Lynch is the former director of Yale Cancer Center and current chief scientific officer at Bristol-Myers Squibb. His talk was presented by the Blavatnik Fund. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New York Biotech Raises $61 Million To Keep Cancer Cells Dormant, Bucking Conventional Treatments
Cancer is thought of as a disease of uncontrolled growth. But over the past few decades scientists have been learning more about cancer cells that behave in a very uncancerlike way. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 7, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ellie Kincaid, Forbes Staff Source Type: news

Do You Learn Your Lessons?
When you look back on your career, do you take the time to focus on the lesson learned? (Source: Diagnostic Imaging)
Source: Diagnostic Imaging - February 7, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Eric Postal, MD Tags: Blog DI Executive Source Type: news

Microbiome could be culprit when good drugs do harm
New Yale research describes how bacteria in the gut can transform three drugs into harmful toxic compounds. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

At epicenter of Zika outbreak, dengue immunity provided protection
While 73% of Salvador, Brazil residents were infected during a 2015 Zika outbreak, those with dengue antibodies were less likely to be affected. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What can we see with an abdominal ultrasound?
Healthcare professionals may use abdominal ultrasounds to diagnose pancreas, liver, and stomach issues. The procedure requires very little preparation, and there are very few risks. Learn more about abdominal ultrasounds here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Number of cancer cases linked to breast implants soars
FDA said it has received reports of 457 unique cancer cases related to breast implants since 2010, including nine patient deaths. The agency identified those unique cases from a total of 660 adverse event reports in the U.S. from 2010 through September 2018, including 246 new adverse event reports since 2017. FDA began reporting on cases of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL), a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and a known risk from breast implants, in 2011. The new total of reports is larger than the number of unique cases because patients, providers, and manufacturers may all repo...
Source: Mass Device - February 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Featured Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Implants News Well Oncology Women's Health Allergan Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Bipolar medications: Everything you need to know
There is a variety of medications that can help manage bipolar disorder, including mood-stabilizers, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants. Learn more about these and other drugs in this article. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Bipolar Source Type: news

Do You Have What It Takes to Become the Next Intuitive Surgical?
Intuitive Surgical set a high bar for new entrants. But there are opportunities today that new surgical robotics companies can take advantage of that Intuitive didn't have when the company started out more than two decades ago. A panel of experts spoke at MD&M West in Anaheim, CA this week about the process of developing medical robotic tools and the valuable lessons learned from watching Intuitive rise to the top. "In the year 2000, if Intuitive Surgical walked into a room and said 'we're going to be worth $60 billion in 20 years' nobody on the planet would have believed them. Nobody," said Leo P...
Source: MDDI - February 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: R & D Source Type: news

Board Meeting Minutes, November 27, 2018
Participants:  Dave deBronkart, Judy Danielson, Peter Elias, Nancy Finn, Sarah Krüg, Janice McCallum, Jan Oldenburg, Burt Rosen, Danny Sands, Joe Ternullo Minutes from October 23, 2018 meeting approved. Leadership for 2018 – Crunch Time                   Danny and Joe Board members need to recommend or self-nominate candidates for members-at-large. Strongest need is for president-elect and treasurer candidates. Danny has talked to a few potential candidates, but none so far have time to take on the responsibilities f...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - February 7, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Janice McCallum Tags: Board Minutes Board Meetings Source Type: news

Bristol universities get active at city ’ s biggest 10k run
University challenge will take on a whole new meaning this year after the Universities of Bristol and the West of England signed up to encourage staff, students and alumni to get active at the Simplyhealth Great Bristol 10K. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Student life, Alumni, Staff notices; Press Release Source Type: news

Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgery Research Fellowship
The Rush Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Department is seeking an ambitious medical student between M3 and M4 who is planning on a year of research to better position themselves for an application to orthopaedic surgery residency. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - February 7, 2019 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Clinical Informatics: Is It the Right Field for You? Clinical Informatics: Is It the Right Field for You?
Clinical informatics is a relatively new subspecialty that focuses on using data to improve patient care. Here's how to tell whether this field may be right for you.Medscape Med Students (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Med Students Article Source Type: news

What's New in the 2019 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes What's New in the 2019 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes
From telemedicine to patient education and lifestyle management, Dr Peters highlights key changes to this year's ADA standards for diabetes care.Medscape Diabetes & Endocrinology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Commentary Source Type: news

EVIL MEDICINE: Med school uses live pigs for medical training, completely disregarding ethics or suffering (this is how they treat humans, too)
(Natural News) Sometimes, doing things the “old-fashioned way” is the best approach — but when it comes to animal testing, the days of yore are best left behind us. In today’s world, there are plenty of alternatives to the cruel and unethical practice of testing on live animals. Now, Brown University is under fire for... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Does education really protect against dementia?
Does the length of time an individual spends in education reduce the risk of developing dementia? A new, large-scale study investigates. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news

40 Under 40 2019: Stephanie Harris built a senior living empire from $100,000 in student loans
After initially living out of her office, Arrow Senior Living's Stephanie Harris built a business that manages 18 communities and employs 800 (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 7, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Use of text messaging for postpartum depression screening and information provision - Lawson A, Dalfen A, Murphy KE, Milligan N, Lancee W.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using text messages to enhance mental health screening and education of women in the immediate postpartum period. METHODS:: A total of 937 postpartum women were recruited fr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Media, Marketing, and Internet Issues Source Type: news

Falls after hospital discharge: a randomized clinical trial of individualized multi-modal falls prevention education - Hill AM, McPhail SM, Haines TP, Morris ME, Etherton-Beer C, Shorr R, Flicker L, Bulsara M, Waldron N, Lee DA, Francis-Coad J, Boudville A.
BACKGROUND: Older people are at high risk of falls after hospital discharge. The study aimed to evaluate the effect of providing individualized falls prevention education in addition to usual care on falls rates in older people after hospital discharge com... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Sleep problem, suicide and self-harm in university students: a  systematic review - Russell K, Allan S, Beattie L, Bohan J, MacMahon K, Rasmussen S.
Suicide and self-harm behaviours represent public health concerns, and university students are a particularly high risk group. Identifying modifiable risk factors for the development and maintenance of suicidal thoughts and behaviours is a research priorit... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Psychiatric symptoms and clinical diagnosis in high school students exposed to the Sewol ferry disaster - Oh JK, Lee MS, Bae SM, Kim E, Hwang JW, Chang HY, Lee J, Kim J, Lee CS, Park J, Bhang SY.
BACKGROUND: Two hundred and fifty 11th grade students and teachers from Danwon High School drowned, during a school trip, in the Sewol Ferry Disaster. The goal of this study was to investigate the experiences of the psychiatrists who volunteered and provid... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Perfectionism and social problem solving as predictors of nonsuicidal self-injury in ethnoracially diverse college students: findings controlling for concomitant suicide risk - Lucas AG, Chang EC, Li M, Chang OD, Hirsch JK.
The present study was designed to examine the extent to which perfectionism and social problem solving add to the prediction model of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), independent of suicide risk, in a sample of 386 ethnoracially diverse college students. Mo... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Epidemiology of khat (Catha edulis) consumption among university students: a meta-analysis - Ayano G, Yohannis K, Abraha M.
BACKGROUND: Khat is amphetamine-like substance commonly consumed by students when they wish to study for long hours especially during examination periods. Khat consumption is associated with increased rates of cardiovascular problems, stroke, myocardial in... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Improving concussion-reporting behavior in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I football players: evidence for the applicability of the socioecological model for athletic trainers - Lininger MR, Wayment HA, Craig DI, Huffman AH, Lane TS.
CONTEXT: Few researchers have examined the views of important stakeholders in American football student-athletes' spheres of influence and whether their views map well in a systems approach to understanding concussion-reporting behavior (CRB). OBJE... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

UNISON spells out Brexit concerns
As we approach the “crisis point” of 29 March, UNISON has three major Brexit concerns, general secretary Dave Prentis told today’s meeting of the union’s national executive council in London. These are: maintaining workers’ rights; keeping tariff-free, barrier-free trade with our largest trade partners; no hard border in Ireland. On workplace rights, Mr Prentis – who met prime minister Theresa May recently – said it was “notable that the protections offered to investors during transition is far greater than that being offered to workers.” On trade, the general secreta...
Source: UNISON Health care news - February 7, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: Article News 2019 National Delegate Conference activists national executive council NEC Source Type: news

Professor Rosamund Sutherland, 1947-2019
Rosamund Sutherland, Emeritus Professor and former Head of the School of Education, died on 26 January. Andrew Pollard leads this remembrance of an international mathematics educator who promoted social justice in the digital age. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Obituaries; Faculty of Social Sciences and Law, School of Education Source Type: news

Professor Rosalind Sutherland, 1947-2019
Rosalind Sutherland, Emeritus Professor and former Head of the School of Education, died on 26 January. Andrew Pollard leads this remembrance of an international mathematics educator who promoted social justice in the digital age. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Obituaries; Faculty of Social Sciences and Law, School of Education Source Type: news

Exclusive: Plans for foundation training for community nursing
Plans are in the pipeline for new foundation training for community nurses, as part of efforts to raise awareness of the role and boost recruitment and retention, Nursing Times has learnt. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - February 7, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Education No Match Against Alzheimer's
Title: Education No Match Against Alzheimer'sCategory: Health NewsCreated: 2/6/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/7/2019 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Alzheimer)
Source: MedicineNet Alzheimer - February 7, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Source Type: news

PET, AI show women's brains age differently than men's
Are women's brains really that much different from men's? In a word, yes. A...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: PET's view of tau could explain women's early dementia Men greatly outnumber women in academic nuclear medicine Why is soccer ball heading more risky for women? Alzheimer's biomarkers could affect races differently Machine learning predicts working-memory performance (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 7, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Nigeria: LASUTH Recruits Over 300 New Resident Doctors to Address Shortage Due to Strike
[Guardian] To bridge the gap created by the ongoing resident doctors strike, the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH) has recruited over 300 new doctors who are set to resume work on Wednesday February 13, 2019. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 7, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Can machine learning deliver critical market insight on consumer needs faster and cheaper?
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) Consumer brands have long used old-fashioned focus groups, interviews and surveys to best gauge consumer wants, desires and needs as part of processes that range from product development, to marketing and sales. As machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) have emerged, there is an increasing interest in the ability to harness these solutions to save time and money, and to yield more reliable consumer insights. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insilico to contribute to Oxford CDT research and educational program in AI
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico Medicine, a Rockville-based company developing the end-to-end drug discovery pipeline utilizing the next generation artificial intelligence, announces its partnership with a new Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) at the University of Oxford, supported by EPSRC (The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How a telenovela was adapted for US audiences: With more sex, violence and alcohol
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) Given the increasing depiction of sex, violence and alcohol use in US media over recent decades, researchers sought to learn if such a 'culture of corruption' would influence an American adaptation of a TV show that originated as Spanish-language telenovela. In a pilot study, the researchers found that the US remake 'Jane the Virgin,' adapted from 'Juana la Virgin,' features more risk behavior and less healthy behavior than the original. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stalled fertility declines linked to disruptions in women's education in Africa
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) A slowdown in fertility decline in sub-Saharan Africa was partially caused by disruptions in women's education in the 1980s, according to new IIASA research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news