Examining the potential role of education in the prevention of radicalization from the psychological perspective - Sklad M, Park E.
This work reviews scholarly literature on processes of violent radicalization to determine how education can prevent radicalization. The first part of the research identifies 3 categories of processes: (a) fulfillment of individual psychological needs; (b)... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Children and adolescent victim blaming - Chapin J, Coleman G.
Findings from a survey of 1,593 United States middle school and high school students indicates more than half the adolescents say they have been verbally bullied; 37% say they have been socially bullied; and 30% say they have been physically bullied. De... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Beyond hookup culture: current trends in the study of college student sex and where to next - Pham JM.
This article will... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Analysis of state-level guidance regarding school-based, universal screening for social, emotional, and behavioral risk - Briesch AM, Chafouleas SM, Chaffee RK.
Despite recommendations to extend prevention and early intervention related to behavioral health into school settings, limited research has been directed toward understanding how these recommendations have been translated by states into education policies ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Forgotten corner of Europe brought back to life thanks to artificial intelligence
A lost world in a former empire in Europe has been brought to life thanks to University of Bristol researchers who used artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to analyse 47,000 multilingual pages from newspapers dating back to 1873. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - June 7, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research, International; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Maths; Press Release Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Education may lead to short-sightedness
New research offers 'strong evidence' that the more years someone spends in full time education, the more likely they are to become short-sighted. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Eye Health / Blindness Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are the best cannabis strains for chronic pain?
Many different medications are available to treat chronic pain. One natural alternative treatment option is marijuana, or cannabis, which has a range of pain-relieving properties. There are different strains of marijuana. The most effective one depends on the type of pain. Learn more about marijuana for pain here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pain / Anesthetics Source Type: news

ASRT readies education, training grants
The American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) Foundation will award...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: ASRT names recipients of author awards ASRT, Canon accept applications for Safety First grant ASRT announces advocacy award recipients ASRT announces recipients of life member, fellow status ASRT backs ASTRO safety, quality initiative (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 7, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Breast pain tends to prompt imaging overuse
Breast pain is common in women, but although it is not necessarily a sign of...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Mass. imaging spending, use higher than other states What's the best way to follow up breast cancer survivors? No need for RBMs: In-house efforts cut imaging rates Johns Hopkins tackles problem of unnecessary scans Machine learning could reduce inappropriate knee MRI scans (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 7, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

3D-printed aortas could work well for TAVR
Researchers from Italy have created low-cost, individually tailored 3D-printed...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Study: 3D-printed mandibles may reduce OR time 3D printing bolsters care for congenital heart disease Flexible 3D-printed heart replicates size, texture Customized 3D-printed liver boosts patient education 3D printing helps evaluate leaks after TAVR procedures (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 7, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Deep learning accurately detects brain hemorrhage
A deep-learning algorithm can provide high sensitivity and specificity for...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: SIIM: AI can accurately detect cerebral microbleeds Live from SIIM 2018: Women in imaging informatics Live from SIIM 2018: AI and value-based healthcare How does radiology AI fit into value-based healthcare? New framework facilitates radiology AI algorithms (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 7, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

A Simulation to Increase Empathy in Pharmacy Students A Simulation to Increase Empathy in Pharmacy Students
This study assessed the efficacy of a program designed to encourage the pharmacy student to empathize with those managing multi-drug, multi-dose medication regimens.American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pharmacist Journal Article Source Type: news

Active HIV in large white blood cells may drive cognitive impairment in infected mice
(PLOS) Macrophages, large white blood cells that engulf and destroy potential pathogens, harbor active viral reserves that appear to play a key role in impaired learning and memory in mice infected with a rodent version of HIV. Chao-Jiang Gu of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and colleagues present these new findings in PLOS Pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 7, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Active HIV in large white blood cells may drive cognitive impairment in infected mice
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) An experimental model of HIV infection in mice, developed by Mount Sinai researchers, has shown that HIV causes learning and memory dysfunction, a cognitive disease that is now observed in about half of HIV infected people that worsens with age, and is currently incurable. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 7, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Letters of recommendation for women more likely to raise doubts
(Rice University) Letters of recommendation written for women are more likely to contain words or phrases that raise doubts about job or education qualifications than letters written for men, according to new research from Rice University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Football training in school greatly improves girls' fitness and health
(University of Southern Denmark Faculty of Health Sciences) Schoolgirls can achieve lower blood pressure, stronger muscles, better balance and improved jumping performance if their school puts football training on the timetable -- including girls who have never played football before. This is the finding of a study of the FIFA 11 for Health in Europe exercise concept in Faroese schoolchildren carried out by football researchers at the University of Southern Denmark, Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children can learn ways to significantly reduce salt usage
(Elsevier) Consuming excessive salt during childhood is associated with cardiovascular health risk factors, yet the effectiveness of education- and behavior-based strategies to lower salt usage among children has not been fully researched. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that a web-based salt education program improved salt-related knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors among children ages 7-10 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Machine learning helps detect lymphedema among breast cancer survivors
(New York University) Machine learning using real-time symptom reports can accurately detect lymphedema, a distressing side effect of breast cancer treatment that is more easily treated when identified early, finds a new study led by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and published in the journal mHealth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New courses at St. Michael’s provide staff training on caring for hospitalized older adults
(Source: St. Michael's Hospital News and Media)
Source: St. Michael's Hospital News and Media - June 7, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Tags: Hospital News Source Type: news

Innovation e-learning
Innovation is all about generating and implementing new ideas and breaking the mould to deliver success. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - June 7, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Mapping climate change impacts on tropical diseases
An atlas developed by an EU-funded project maps the risk in eastern Africa of three tropical diseases. Now used in teaching and research, it could one day support models that better predict how environmental changes might impact public health. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - June 7, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Myopia could be linked to longer periods spent in education
Educational practices may need to change to prevent damaged vision Related items fromOnMedica Eye problems: the eyelids Eye problems Eye health care placing avoidable pressure on GPs in London Two thirds of eye units restricting access to cataract surgery Stem cell 'patch' offers hope for macular degeneration (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - June 7, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Highly Educated, Very Nearsighted?
People who spent more years in school were more likely to have myopia. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Genetics and Heredity Eyes and Eyesight Education Source Type: news

Study finds spending more time in education causes myopia (short-sight)
Myopia, or short-sight, is one of leading causes of visual disability in the world. The global prevalence is rising rapidly and has reached epidemic levels in the developed countries of East and Southeast Asia. Now a new study, led by the University of Bristol, has shed some light on why the length of time spent in education is a causal risk factor for myopia. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - June 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School; Press Release Source Type: news

What Amazon and Uber Could Teach Medicine About EHRs What Amazon and Uber Could Teach Medicine About EHRs
Panelists at a Stanford symposium looked at ways to improve use of EHRs. A new poll done for the university confirms continued deep physician dissatisfaction with current approaches.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

Everyday discrimination, negative emotions, and academic achievement in Filipino secondary school students: cross-sectional and cross-lagged panel investigations - Datu JAD.
Different forms of overt discrimination have been consistently linked to maladaptive psychological, physical health, and educational outcomes. However, limited research has been carried out to assess the link of subtle forms of discrimination like everyday... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

How community and peer perceptions promote college students' pro-social bystander actions to prevent sexual violence - Banyard VL, Rizzo AJ, Bencosme Y, Cares AC, Moynihan MM.
The prevalence of sexual violence crimes on U.S. college campuses is prompting institutions of higher education to increasingly invest in centers to support survivors and programs to prevent the violence before it happens. Understanding bystanders to sexua... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Gender differences in response to a school-based mindfulness training intervention for early adolescents - Kang Y, Rahrig H, Eichel K, Niles HF, Rocha T, Lepp NE, Gold J, Britton WB.
Mindfulness training has been used to improve emotional wellbeing in early adolescents. However, little is known about treatment outcome moderators, or individual differences that may differentially impact responses to treatment. The current study focused ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Latest Gates Foundation grants will advance research on educational inclusion and global immunization
Two grants totaling nearly $2.3 million from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation will support UCLA research on education in the U.S. and public health in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.A three-year award of $1.5 million will help Jane Margolis and Jean Ryoo, researchers at theUCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, discover which teaching practices and social supports are most effective in engaging high school students from underrepresented groups in computer science education.UCLAJane MargolisExtending the research scope of a recent National Science Foundation grant, the Gates Foundation ’...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Funding Awarded for Interactive Health Information Kiosks
The GMR office is excited to announce that Richland Public Health in Mansfield, Ohio has been granted a Health Information Outreach Award for its project, Interactive Health Information Kiosks in Richland County Libraries. Background: Richland County (RC) is comprised of an urban center surrounded by a number of rural villages and townships. Both of these areas are comprised of RC’s impoverished and underserved populations. Access to relevant and appropriate health information has been a long standing issue within RC. Many residents do not have personal access to Internet services and have low education levels. In a...
Source: The Cornflower - June 6, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Derek Johnson Tags: Funding News from the Region Outreach Public Health Public Libraries Success Stories Source Type: news

Suicide Rates Increasing Among Middle-Aged Women
Boston (CBS) — Kate Spade, who was found dead in her Manhattan apartment Tuesday in an apparent suicide, may have been suffering from bipolar disorder according to her sister. The designer’s sister told CBS News that Spade, known for her sleek handbags and bright colors, considered seeking treatment several times but was worried about how it would affect her upbeat brand. Though a source close to the family told People Magazine that the designer and her sister were estranged and the sister did not know what was going on in Spade’s life. Police do believe Spade may have been struggling with ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Uncategorized Dr. Mallika Marshall Local TV Mental Health Women's Health Source Type: news

Meet Sabrina Gonzalez Pasterski, a Physics Whiz So Talented That Stephen Hawking Cited Her
This article originally appeared on InStyle.com (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - June 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Shalayne Pulia / InStyle Tags: Uncategorized Aviation onetime Science Source Type: news

Manufacturers Assistance and Technical Training Branch (MATTB)
CBER ’s Manufacturers Assistance and Technical Training Branch (MATTB) responds to public inquiries for information (by phone and email) from the biologics industry. MATTB strives to provide timely, accurate and useful information to stakeholders. (Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - June 6, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Starbucks' "sensitivity training" actually just a forced "re-education camp" that subjected employees to police brutality videos
(Natural News) Late last month, Starbucks closed hundreds of stores across the country in order to provide their employees with racial sensitivity training following the arrest of two black men at a Philadelphia store back in April. This wasn’t just any racial sensitivity training, however; this was anti-cop propaganda and social justice indoctrination of the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

US Physics Doctoral Programs See Precipitous Drop in International Applications
A new American Physical Society survey finds the number of international students applying to U.S. physics Ph.D. programs fell by an average of 12 percent from 2017 to 2018. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - June 6, 2018 Category: Physics Authors: awolfe Source Type: news

How Autoinjector Technologies Could Change Drug Delivery
Autoinjector technologies have come a long way over the years, and recent advancements are paving the way for an exciting new generation of devices that can be used for a variety of different therapies. Epinephrine autoinjectors are one of the most common iterations of the technology, but lately, device makers have been expanding the realm of possibility for autoinjector technologies, specifically through new devices that can communicate with patients and incorporate user feedback. Of course with new technologies, comes new challenges. Device developers still struggle with ensuring dose accuracy, minimizing discomfort, and...
Source: MDDI - June 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kristopher Sturgis Tags: MD & M East (New York) Design Source Type: news

Wichita's KingFit on the move again
Company CEO says new location creates opportunities to partner with local students on production projects. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 6, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Josh Heck Source Type: news

Request for Proposal: Addressing Health and Equity through Comprehensive Plans
The American Planning Association (APA) is working with the Health Impact Project (HIP) to help planners use comprehensive plans for addressing issues related to health and equity. At least three communities will be selected to receive training and coaching on social determinants of health, health equity, and APA's Comprehensive Plan Standards for Sustaining Places. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Verma Unveils State Medicaid Scorecard But Refuses to Judge Efforts Verma Unveils State Medicaid Scorecard But Refuses to Judge Efforts
Seema Verma, who heads the Centers for Medicare& Medicaid Services, refused to discuss the findings in any detail or comment on any individual states performing poorly or exceptionally.Kaiser Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Med Students News Source Type: news

Turning Surgeons Into Innovators Without Taking Them Out of the OR
Academic hospitals have all the makings for rich medical device development. They have physicians to identify surgical needs, researchers to test theories, bioengineers to design and create devices and patients to participate in clinical trials. However, disconnect between engineering and surgical departments makes innovation a challenge. So does surgeons' all-consuming job Number One—treating patients. Surgical Innovations, part of the University of California, San Francisco's Department of Surgery and Bioengineering & Therapeutic Sciences, aims to open communication between clinical academic surgeons and bioeng...
Source: MDDI - June 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Heather R. Johnson Tags: R & D Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are the first signs of gluten intolerance?
Gluten is present in many foods, and a person ’s digestive system can be affected by gluten. They can experience symptoms that include constipation and fatigue, which may indicate a tendency for gluten intolerance. Learn more about the symptoms of gluten intolerance here and how avoiding specific foods may relieve them. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

How germs thrive on school desks
Looking at the microbial communities that grow on students ’ desks, a team of researchers found that they overwhelmingly came from the kids sitting at the desks. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - June 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Demers Ambulances Announces the Launch of New Online Parts Catalog
Montreal– Demers Ambulances, a North American leader in ambulance manufacturing, has launched a new online parts catalog. The new catalog, which is accessible from the Demers Ambulances website, offers multiple benefits to both end users and dealers in reducing downtime and checking product availability. “Our customers need to maintain an optimal number of ambulances that are ready to answer emergency calls as efficiently as possible,” said Benoit Lafortune, executive vice-president at Demers Ambulances. ‘’The new online parts catalog will further assist our customers in meeting these expectat...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Demers Ambulances Tags: Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Industry News Source Type: news

Demers Ambulances Announces the Launch of New Online Parts Catalog
Montreal– Demers Ambulances, a North American leader in ambulance manufacturing, has launched a new online parts catalog. The new catalog, which is accessible from the Demers Ambulances website, offers multiple benefits to both end users and dealers in reducing downtime and checking product availability. “Our customers need to maintain an optimal number of ambulances that are ready to answer emergency calls as efficiently as possible,” said Benoit Lafortune, executive vice-president at Demers Ambulances. ‘’The new online parts catalog will further assist our customers in meeting these expectat...
Source: JEMS Operations - June 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Demers Ambulances Tags: Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Industry News Source Type: news

Demers Ambulances Announces the Launch of New Online Parts Catalog
Montreal– Demers Ambulances, a North American leader in ambulance manufacturing, has launched a new online parts catalog. The new catalog, which is accessible from the Demers Ambulances website, offers multiple benefits to both end users and dealers in reducing downtime and checking product availability. “Our customers need to maintain an optimal number of ambulances that are ready to answer emergency calls as efficiently as possible,” said Benoit Lafortune, executive vice-president at Demers Ambulances. ‘’The new online parts catalog will further assist our customers in meeting these expectat...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Demers Ambulances Tags: Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Industry News Source Type: news

How the New Generation of Doctors Will Approach Gun Violence How the New Generation of Doctors Will Approach Gun Violence
Although few programs exist to prepare future physicians for prevention, treatment, and advocacy around gun violence, some medical trainees see recent shootings as a tipping point for change.Medscape Med Students (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Med Students Article Source Type: news

NEC gears up for union ’s annual ‘parliament’
UNISON’s national executive council (NEC) met in London today to finalise arrangements for the union’s annual “parliament” in Brighton later this month. UNISON’s national delegate conference runs from 19-22 June and brings together 2,000 delegates from across the UK to debate policy and set the union’s agenda for the coming year. The NEC agreed policy positions on proposed amendments to motions and rule changes; noted the order of business for the conference and confirmed that guest speakers would include Loretta Johnson of the American Federation of Teachers and Angie Rayner MP. Labour ...
Source: UNISON Health care news - June 6, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: Article 2018 National Delegate Conference national executive council NEC Source Type: news

Scientists see inner workings of enzyme telomerase, which plays key roles in aging, cancer
Cancer, aging-related diseases and other illnesses are closely tied to an important enzyme called “telomerase.” UCLA researchersreport in the journal  Cell the deepest scientific understanding yet of this once-mysterious enzyme, whose catalytic core — where most of its activity occurs — can now be seen in near atomic resolution.“We’re now seeing not just the face of the clock, we’re seeing how the components inside interact to make it work,” said Juli Feigon, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry in the UCLA College and a senior author of the study. “At ea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Chlamydia and erectile dysfunction: What's the link?
Some people who have chlamydia also experience erectile dysfunction (ED), which involves problems getting or maintaining an erection. Chlamydia can infect the prostate gland, leading to prostatitis, pain, and ED. In this article, learn more about the link between this common infection and ED, and treatments for both. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Sexual Health / STDs Source Type: news