Why Success Often Drives Friends Apart
You're reading Why Success Often Drives Friends Apart, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Sometimes when those close to us reach success in their careers or personal life, we start to get jealous and wonder why weren't as fortunate. Some people have fundamental difficulties with handling success—in particular, the success of others. We can accept that strangers are successful, but sometimes it bothers us to see our friends, a former classmate, colleague, and sometimes even our own siblings succeed, even...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeline Familia Tags: featured self improvement success jealousy pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

May 24, Lillian Gilbreth: Today in the History of Psychology (24th May 1878)
Lillian Moller Gilbreth was born. A pioneer in the field of industrial and organizational psychology, Gilbreth introduced the concept of the time and motion study as a business efficiency and productivity technique. During her remarkable career, Gilbreth became the first female member of the Society of Industrial Engineers and the first woman to receive the Hoover Medal for distinguished public service by an engineer. Gilbreth's legacy was also acknowledged in 1984 when the United States Postal Service issued a stamp in Gilbreth's honor as part of their Great Americans series. See following link to learn about some of the ...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - May 25, 2018 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Researching Episodic Memory and Alzheimer ’s Disease
Alzheimer’s disease now affects approximately 5.5 million Americans, and it is estimated that 16 million people will be living with the disease by the year 2050. To put this in perspective, while deaths from heart disease have decreased by 14 percent since 2000, deaths from Alzheimer’s disease have increased by 89%. It is interesting to note that 35 percent of caregivers (family and friends) of Alzheimer’s or other dementia patients report that their own health has declined compared to 19 percent of caregivers of older people with no dementia. This illness can cause intense suffering not only for those w...
Source: World of Psychology - May 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Brain and Behavior Memory and Perception Research Alzheimer's disease Episodic memory Memory Loss Source Type: blogs

The Phillips Curve Is Dead (except in Federal Reserve and CBO models)
“Is the Phillips Curve Dead?” asked Princeton economistAlan Blinder in a May 3Wall Street Journal article. The former Vice-Chairman of the Fed noted that “the correlation between unemployment and changes in inflation is nearly zero… Inflation has barely moved as unemployment rose and fell.”For a veteran Ivy League Keynesian like Blinder to doubt the Phillips Curve was doctrinal heresy, comparable to a monetarist asking if money matters or a supply-sider wondering aloud if a 91% tax rate is better than a 28% rate.Wall Street Journal columnistGreg Ip later explained the dilemma and expanded it:...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 24, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alan Reynolds Source Type: blogs

How to deal with devastating criticism
“Why don’t you just get a shotgun and blow his brains out next time? Better yet, next time stay the hell away from my patient!” I was frozen, and the ICU attending wasn’t even talking to me. My co-intern had barely started her presentation when she met damnation. Mind you — there was a senior resident, a pulmonary fellow, and a team of nurses caring for the patient also. Yet the intern bore the brunt of the criticism. Health care is often like this and can feel like a dog-eat-dog world with a rigid hierarchy and archaic rituals. I still find myself thinking about my internship in 2008, a monum...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 24, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/varun-verma" rel="tag" > Varun Verma, MD < /a > Tags: Education Critical Care Hospital-Based Medicine Source Type: blogs

That Time When They Censored Fahrenheit 451
The reviews of HBO ’s “Fahrenheit 451” haven’tbeen sogood, but at least the publicity shouldlead more people to read a great dystopian novel. Talking about the book many years later,Bradbury said, “I wasn’t worried about freedom, I was worried about people being turned into morons by TV…the moronic influence of popular culture through local TV news and the proliferation of giant screens and the bombardment of factoids.” If only he could see our current culture, where TV news agitates viewers into warring tribes.But he certainly portrayed a society in which an authoritarian g...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 24, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: David Boaz Source Type: blogs

Double Standards, Trojan Style
By NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD The University of Southern California (USC) appears to look the other way when male physicians harass or assault women. In reality, sexual violence spares no occupation, including medicine, but the way an organization responds to crime against women indicates a certain level of integrity. The World Health Organization estimates sexual violence affects one-third of all women worldwide. In a nation where women make up 50% or more of each incoming medical school class, only sixteen percent of medical school deans are female, making gender imbalance in leadership positions nearly impossible to overcome. Fo...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: OP-ED Physicians #MeToo Sexual Assault USC Source Type: blogs

Origin Story: Paul M Black, CEO of Allscripts – Deep Roots and Optimism in Healthcare
This is first in a new series of articles. Over the coming weeks and months I will be publishing the origin stories of interesting, inspiring people in healthcare. These men and women come from all walks of life. Some are titans in the industry, others are leading grass-roots efforts. All are making an impact on healthcare. As a self-professed comic-book geek, I am fascinated by origin stories – the account or back-story that reveals how someone became who they are today. Origin stories add to the overall narrative and give reasons for a person’s intentions. Knowing someone’s origin stories can give clues...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - May 24, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Colin Hung Tags: HealthCare IT Healthcare IT Interviews Allscripts Allscripts CEO Cerner Eclipsys McKesson misys Paul Black Source Type: blogs

How Would Your Life Change If You Weren ’t So Stressed?
That’s something I used think about quite often. I’d dream about how that would be. For a while. And then reality would come running around the corner and at me again. The stress would ramp up. And I’d tell myself that that this is normal and just how life is for almost all of us in today’s society. But about 6 years ago I had finally had enough. Something had to change. The stress was wearing me out. Physically and emotionally. It was dragging me down and holding me back in life. And I was worried about what it could lead to in the long run for my health (would there be bigger problems than a lack...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Henrik Edberg Tags: Personal Development Source Type: blogs

Make your own probiotic yogurt and save money
Probiotics are essential in your Wheat Belly lifestyle, especially in the initial weeks and months of engaging in the program (longer if you have gastrointestinal conditions). They are essential because prior wheat/grain/sugar consumption disrupts composition of bowel flora and restoration to something closer to normal is part of your recovery. While we still have plenty to learn—what species, what combinations of species, inclusion of fungi like Saccharomyces boulardii, which species help control/reverse small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and methanogenic species, etc.—there are unquestioned benefits to tak...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 24, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten-free grain-free grains microbiota prebiotic probiotic reuteri yogurt Source Type: blogs

The good, bad, and the ugly of being a medical expert witness
I have spent a good part of my career investing time and energy towards side hustles.  I generally categorize them into two distinct types of ventures.  The lazy side hustle involves starting a business or consulting in a field tangential to ones main hustle.  For example, an accountant who works normally as an auditor may do a few tax returns on the side during tax season.  I call his type of work “lazy” because most likely, the professional does not need any extensive extra training on top of what they already have obtained for their primary career.  The non-lazy side hustle...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 24, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/docg" rel="tag" > DocG, MD < /a > Tags: Finance Practice Management Source Type: blogs

5 Reasons Why Artificial Intelligence Won ’t Replace Physicians
Hype and fears surround artificial intelligence taking jobs in healthcare. Will it render physicians obsolete? Will it replace the majority of medical professionals? The Medical Futurist decided to set things straight. Here are five fundamental reasons why A.I. won’t replace doctors and never will. The medical community should not fall for the fearmongering around A.I. At the dawn of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, automation and digitization are turning the job market upside down. Many fear that robots, A.I., and automation, in general, will take their jobs without alternatives. The same anxieties emerged in healt...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 24, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine AI digital health insurance doctor Healthcare job job market physician technology Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Diverse Diseases, Allied Advocates
Listen to part two of the episode recorded live on location at HealtheVoices 2018. (Part one was posted last week, so check it out if you haven’t, already.) In this continuation of the multi-advocate panel discussion, our panelists talk about the most difficult aspect of their advocacy and how they deal with it. They also address misconceptions and ignorance about their diseases, such as the difference between AIDS and HIV or IBD and IBS, the fact that lupus is not contagious, and that men can have breast cancer. To close out the episode, each panelist shares his/her thoughts on what advocates for different condition...
Source: World of Psychology - May 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Advocacy Source Type: blogs

Reviewing Target Mechanisms for Exercise Mimetic Development
The open access paper noted here reviews some of the known molecular targets for the development of exercise mimetics. An exercise mimetic is a therapy that in some way triggers a fraction of the beneficial cellular response to exercise. Exercise mimetic development lags behind calorie restriction mimetic development, and both are very slow, very expensive lines of work with - so far - little to show in terms of practical, useful therapies. It remains the case that it is far easier and better to actually exercise or practice calorie restriction. Even when the first truly effective therapies are available in the clinic, and...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 24, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Turning social phenomena into data: measurement instruments for the social sciences (Part 2)
What social phenomena are the most difficult to grasp and describe quantitatively? There can be no general answer to that question. Researchers interested in individual differences may say that getting to the bottom of individual personalities, or how they differ, is really challenging. Other researchers working on social groups may say that aggregate scores do not adequately present the reality of the dynamics in groups. Researchers dealing with contextual phenomena at local, regional, or global levels may lament the fact that access to high quality data is difficult and the “right” level for aggregating data ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - May 24, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Roberto Garbero Tags: Health Open Access Publishing psychology Science:Social social sciences Source Type: blogs

Eponymythology: Second-degree AV block
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Eponyms can be confusing and open to misinterpretation. By plotting the historical course of their folksonomic semantic derivation we gain a deeper understanding of the condition, the authors and the eponym. We review the early development of arrhythmia recording and the contributions of Luciani, Galabin, Gaskell, Wenckebachh, Hay and Mobitz to the current terminology associated with the categorization of Second-degree Atrioventricular block Current terminology Mob...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ben Mackenzie Tags: Eponymythology Atrioventricular block AV block Galabin Gaskell Hay Hay AV Block Luciani Mobitz Second-degree wenckebach Wenckebach AV Block Source Type: blogs

vintage scutmonkey: psych
OK, I think this is the last of this throwback series. It also happens to be the first " Scutmonkey " comic I wrote (even before" The Twelve Types of Med Students, " even*), and I finished it about a month before I graduated from med school. It seems that the Wayback Machine doesn't archive every last image in a deep side branch of your main blog, which is why half the panels are kind of greyscale and janky (photos of a photocopy, you know). But hopefully it's all still legible.Two small points. One is that I think it's not necessarily the kind of topic I'd write about so freely now, because, you know, ...
Source: the underwear drawer - May 24, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

Don ’t be mean: Treat your team members with respect
“Those emergency room residents are f**king retarded!” This was the comment that rang through the workroom.  I had only been on this hospital service for three days, and I was having a discussion about a patient with my attending when the on-call resident had burst into the workroom and sat down next to me. He was fuming. “Why the f*** would they think I need to be consulted for this? Only a f**king retard would think that.” In a few months I will become one of those “f**king retarded ED docs,” and his outburst immediately made me feel defensive. The resident who uttered this phrase...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/aaron-lacy" rel="tag" > Aaron Lacy < /a > Tags: Education Hospital-Based Medicine Medical school Source Type: blogs

5 Considerations for the Family/SLP Relationship
Speech-language pathologist Phuong Lien Palafox anticipated a delicate approach for treating her close friend Nada’s son, especially when she realized he had childhood apraxia of speech, not an area of specialty for her.  With the foundation of a trusting relationship, she rallied her resources and dove into treating him, learning valuable lessons about client relationships along the way. Nada’s Story Our speech-language treatment journey began like that of many other families. We trusted our intuition and had our 2-year-old son Sammy evaluated for a speech delay. He qualified for early intervention treatm...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - May 23, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Phuong Palafox Tags: Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Early Intervention Source Type: blogs

Computer Models of Arm and Hand Anatomy to Improve Function of Prosthetic Devices
New users of advanced prosthetic devices have to undergo tedious training routines in order for the computer that controls the given prosthesis to understand the wishes of the user. Sensors are used to measure the electrical activity of the muscles use to signal a prosthetic to move, but these signals change drastically depending on the user’s posture and orientation, amount of sweat formed between the skin and the sensors, and even the time of day. Now researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed a way of avoiding a lot of this training for ...
Source: Medgadget - May 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Rehab Source Type: blogs

Show Me the (Education) Money, Finale!
ConclusionIf someone tells you that public school spending has been “gutted” or “cut to the bone,” or any other body-destroying description, the first thing to note is that for many decades prior to the Great Recession we shoved so much food into the public schooling system that it would more accurately have been seen as threatened with obesity than “gutti ng.” Even since the recession, we haven’t typically gutted anything—significant funding has still flowed—and that includes in most embattled states. That said, at least based on salaries, teachers have seen their comp...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 23, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Neal McCluskey Source Type: blogs

Addiction Treatment ‘Science’ and Dead Rats
In my last post I teased that I would write about fake science.  I’ll try to make it interesting. The internet allows everyone to do research about symptoms and treatments for any condition. If not for need for prescriptions, people could act as their own doctors.  But a huge dose of caution is necessary before anyone takes that path. Realize first that doctors don’t treat themselves or even their family members.  The saying that ‘a person representing himself in court has a fool for a lawyer’ applies double in healthcare.  Treating someone close to one’s self introduces a ...
Source: Suboxone Talk Zone - May 23, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jeffrey Junig MD PhD Tags: Education Pharma pharmacology Research treatment alcohol treatment fake science FDA approval nutritional supplements Source Type: blogs

What does curiosity have to do with patient safety?
Why do we say “curiosity killed the cat?” Isn’t curiosity what drives people to ask insightful questions? To keep an open mind? And to continue learning at age 6 or 60, alike? Curiosity is what sets apart people who are fixed in their opinions and beliefs and those who adjust in light of new information. Recently, I read an article in The New Yorker that suggested that Donald Trump doesn’t read books unlike most of his predecessors. One aspect of my transition to academia from industry that continues to surprise me (every day!) is how much people read — they not only read peer-reviewed literat...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/elizabeth-lerner-papautsky" rel="tag" > Elizabeth Lerner Papautsky, PhD < /a > Tags: Patient Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's World - The New Reality
Once you accept Alzheimer's World and learn how to operate in Alzheimer's World you'll learn that opposites can indeed attract. And stick together like glue.To understand Alzheimer'sYou must redefine realityThis new reality is calledAlzheimer's WorldWhat is the Difference Between Alzheimer ’s and DementiaBy Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomSubscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading - This is a Free Service - Join NowImagine communicating with someone for 50 years or longer. Then they change.They are not the person you always knew? If not, then who are they? Who?This person you always knew,starts acting and coping with th...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - May 23, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care alzheimer's symptoms alzheimer's world dementia care help alzheimer's help with dementia help with dementia care memory care facility nursing home understanding alzheimer's Source Type: blogs

Medical education in the era of climate change
In the days after Hurricane Maria made landfall on Puerto Rico, four Yale physicians began an ambitious effort to send thousands of pounds of medical supplies to the storm-ravaged island. Despite having had no prior experience with disaster response, these doctors worked with contacts in Puerto Rico to generate a detailed needs-assessment, determining exactly which medical supplies were needed on the island. Using social media, traditional media, and professional connections, they solicited large-scale donations of medications and supplies, coordinated airplanes to the island, and remotely managed ground transport of speci...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/tyler-greenway-and-william-hancock-cerutti" rel="tag" > Tyler Greenway and William Hancock-Cerutti < /a > Tags: Policy Medical school Public Health & Source Type: blogs

New book highlights continued brain development throughout adolescence, even into our 20s
– Dr. Sarah-Jane Blakemore _____ Neuroscientist Probes Myths About the Teenage Brain (Education Week): “We often think early childhood is this dramatic window of learning and development in the brain, and you’re highlighting adolescence as a different kind of window. Can you talk a little bit about that? I was told when I was an undergraduate that the human brain pretty much stopped developing after mid-childhood. From [magnetic resonance imaging] of living brains, we’ve discovered that that’s not true at all—in fact, the brain continues to develop right throughout childhood and adolesce...
Source: SharpBrains - May 23, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning adolescence brain development magnetic resonance imaging teenage-brain Source Type: blogs

Could medications contribute to dementia?
Alzheimer’s disease and other illnesses that cause dementia are devastating, not only for those affected but also for their friends and family. For most forms of dementia, there is no highly effective treatment. For example, available treatments for Alzheimer’s disease may slow the deterioration a bit, but they don’t reverse the condition. In fact, for most people taking medications for dementia, it may be difficult to know if the treatment is working at all. Experts predict that dementia will become much more common in the coming years. We badly need a better understanding of the cause of these condition...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Drugs and Supplements Memory Source Type: blogs

How Health IT Helps and Hurts Patients – #HITsm Chat Topic
We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 5/25 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Amanda (@LALupusLady) on the topic of “How Health IT Helps and Hurts Patients (Especially Those with Chronic Conditions).” Health IT is a powerful tool. It has changed the way patients, especially people with chronic illnesses live with and manage their care. As a woman living with multiple autoimmune illnesses for over three decades, my perspective is unique as I have seen the shift and how providers have been eager to adopt ...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - May 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: #HITsm Clinical Decision Support Digital Health Healthcare HealthCare IT Healthcare Social Media #HITsm Topics Amanda Health IT Expo LALupusLady Source Type: blogs

11 Ways to Simplify and Enjoy Your Life More
“Our life is frittered away by detail…simplify, simplify.” – Henry David Thoreau If the idea of simplifying your life is appealing, you might be more motivated and likely to get started on this goal if you can find an easier way to do it. Complicated lists filled with difficult tasks won’t get the job done.  What will, however, are ways that are both easily-understood and generally easier to do and have the added benefit of helping you get more enjoyment out of life. Here are 11 to try. Streamline your to-do lists. Most efficiency and time-management experts recommend streamlining items...
Source: World of Psychology - May 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Habits Happiness Organization Simplicity simplification Spring Cleaning Source Type: blogs

Strangers are more likely to come to your help in a racially diverse neighbourhood
By Alex Fradera The “Big Society” initiative – launched at the turn of this decade by the incoming British government – was a call for politics to recognise the importance of community and social solidarity. It has since fizzled out, and for a while communitarianism fell out of the political conversation, but it has returned post-Brexit, sometimes with a nationalist or even nativist flavour. The US political scientist Robert Putnam’s research is sometimes recruited into these arguments, as his data suggests that racially and ethnically diverse neighbourhoods have lower leve...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - May 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Political Social Source Type: blogs

Improving the Effectiveness of Air Force Squadron Commanders
United States Air Force commanders around the world understand their responsibilities, but they believe that many unrecognized duties interfere with mission performance. They are generally prepared by professional education and career progression to fulfill their responsibilities, but they could use more instruction on how to command. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - May 23, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: John A. Ausink; Miriam Matthews Source Type: blogs

The Case for Corequisites: What Are the Ingredients of Success?
More than two thirds of community college students and 40 percent of four-year college students take at least one developmental education course. States and colleges across the United States are experimenting with innovative approaches to developmental education to improve graduation rates for struggling students. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - May 23, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Lindsay Daugherty Source Type: blogs

To change the culture, start with clinical education
The hardest thing about medical school isn’t learning medicine. It isn’t the hours. It isn’t the tests. It’s that you sign away control over years of your adult life. When I started my clerkship year in January, I felt like I was stepping onto a conveyor belt and would not be allowed off for twelve long months. For the entirety of 2018, my days are planned for me, my hours are set, and my attendance is mandatory. I have the distinct feeling that this year is happening to me. My classmates and I are currently marching through a pre-determined set of rotations, the lowest-ranking members on every team...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anonymous" rel="tag" > Anonymous < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (May 14-22): #TheResident, #ChicagoMed
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. The Resident (Season 1; Episode 14): Treating Loved Ones; Chemo for Healthy Patients ; Chicago Med (Season 3; Episode 20): Doctor and jury The Resident (Season 1; Episode 14): Treating Loved Ones; Chemo for Healthy Patients In the season finale, we learn that Hunter has been telling healthy people that they have cancer (when they do not) and giving them chemotherapy. She is committing Medicare fraud and also artificially bumping her success rates at curing cancer. Pravesh informs Lily, a frequent flyer, that she does not have cancer and is a victim of Hunter.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 22, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Featured Posts professional ethics Source Type: blogs

What Should Teen Rehab Provide?
Sometimes, for the young person, simply being removed from the environment where the dysfunction is occurring for a short while helps more than anything else. There are benefits and challenges to sending a teenager to rehab, both for the parents and the teen. Being away from home and friends, disgruntled peers, feeling alienated and misunderstood by therapists and treatment center staff and a bevy of new rules can all create upheaval. For adolescents, whose emotions are already more volatile and unpredictable, it can be difficult to find the willingness to do the frequently taxing psychological work that’s part of tr...
Source: World of Psychology - May 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Addiction Children and Teens Family Publishers Recovery The Fix Adolescents Alcohol Drugs Parents Rehab teen rehab teen treatment center Teenager triggers Source Type: blogs

Exercise Slows Aspects of Cardiovascular Aging, Protects Against Cell Stress
The glass half full view on exercise is that it modestly slows aging. The glass half empty view is that being sedentary accelerates age-related decline. Our species evolved in an environment that demanded considerably more physical activity than is the case in today's era of comfort, calories, and machineries of transportation. Lacking that activity, we suffer. There are any number of papers that provide evidence showing that a surprisingly large fraction of cardiovascular and muscle aging, loss of function and loss of strength, is preventable. Exercise can't stop aging, but it can certainly make a meaningful difference to...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 22, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

App Interprets Cries of Infants to Help Deaf People Raise Kids
Being deaf while raising a child can be a serious challenge, in part because it’s impossible to know when your child is crying and to understand what that crying is supposed to imply. Researchers at University of California, Los Angeles have now developed software that listens to a baby’s crying and interprets it based on a few clues that parents with healthy hearing have learned to focus on. “For example, if a cry has a long period of silence, it’s more likely that the baby is fussy,” says Ariana Anderson, PhD, the lead researcher of the project. “If there are constant, high-volume fre...
Source: Medgadget - May 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Net News Pediatrics Rehab Source Type: blogs

Webinar for Postdoctoral Research Associate Training (PRAT) Program Applicants
We’re hosting a webinar for students and fellows interested in the PRAT Program for the October 3 receipt date: Wednesday, June 20, 1:30-2:30 p.m. ET. PRAT is a competitive three-year fellowship program that prepares trainees for leadership positions in biomedical careers. Training includes a mentored laboratory research experience and intensive career and leadership development activities. PRAT fellows conduct research in laboratories in the NIH Intramural Research Program (IRP) in basic biomedical research areas within the NIGMS mission. These areas include, but are not limited to, biological chemistry, biophysics,...
Source: NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - May 22, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Dr. Kenneth Gibbs Tags: Funding Opportunities Meetings/Events Training/Fellowships/Career Development PRAT Preparing an Application Webinars Source Type: blogs

4 Ways to Deal with Anger and Confusion on the Part of a Loved One Living with Dementia
The more confused a person living with dementia becomes the meaner they get.On the other hand, greater activity on their part creates better awareness and self esteem.How to talk and communicate with dementia patients effectivelyBy Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomSubscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading - This is a Free Service - Join Now1. When a person living with dementia is left alone it is very easy for them to get angry and confused.Persons living with dementialose the ability to tell time. Not only what time it is, or what day it is; but also, duration of time.When you go out, or are unseen for a short period of time...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - May 22, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care Alzheimer's Dementia dementia care dementia help for caregivers help alzheimer's help with dementia care lifestyle memory care facility Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Care Why Do the Deeply Forgetful Say No So Often
Many Alzheimer's caregivers accept the word "No" from the deeply forgetful without ever trying to figure out why they say it.By Bob De MarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomS/he says no all the time, the caregiver complains.It is very common for a person that is deeply forgetful to say "no" when you ask them to do something. I don't know why, but it seems like this is a secret to many in the dementia communityeven though this is a common occurrence.What is The Difference Between Alzheimer ’s and DementiaSubscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading - This is a Free ServiceI knew for a long time when Dotty said &quo...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - May 22, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care Alzheimer's Dementia dementia care help alzheimer's help with dementia memory care facility nursing home searches related to dementia care Source Type: blogs

The Frightened, Angry, Anxious, Mean Dementia Patient
Don't get angry at the actions of someone that is living with dementia. Instead remind yourself - it is not their fault.by Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomBored, frightened, bewildered, apprehensive, anxious and angry. I can say that everyone of those words applied to Dotty when I first arrived in Delray Beach to care for her.It just amazed me how easy it was for Dotty to get out of balance.To get mean.How simple? Consider this.Topic -Alzheimer's Care and CommunicationDotty would be standing there with the door wide open on the refrigerator and making a sandwich. She didn't do it the way most of us do it. We usually tak...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - May 22, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer alzheimer's care alzheimer's caregiving Alzheimer's Dementia anger care of dementia patients dementia care health help alzheimer's help with dementia care lifestyle memory care facility Source Type: blogs

The best medical specialty you ’ve never heard of
The most common response when I introduce myself as a preventive medicine resident is an interjection, “You mean family medicine?” I have come to realize that the majority of the healthcare field has never heard of preventive medicine as a unique medical specialty. It’s a shame, because preventive medicine is truly the best medical specialty you’ve never heard of. Preventive medicine practices at the intersection of public health and clinical medicine — we are population doctors. Sure, we love vaccines as much as the next physician, but we do so much more than give flu shots. We provide clinic...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jennifer-chevinsky" rel="tag" > Jennifer Chevinsky, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

6 reasons children need to play outside
Here’s something really simple you can do to improve your child’s chance of future health and success: make sure he spends plenty of time playing outside. There are many ways in which this generation’s childhood is different from that of the last generation, but one of the most abrupt contrasts is the degree to which it is being spent indoors. There are lots of reasons, including the marked increase in time spent interacting with electronic devices, the emphasis on scheduled activities and achievements, concerns about sun exposure — and, for many families, the lack of safe outdoor places to play. It...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

Editorial Board Q & A: Monica L. Lypson, MD, MHPE
Monica L. Lypson, MD, MHPE, Director of Medical and Dental Education, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC Describe your current activities.  In my current role as the Director of Medical and Dental Education for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), I provide leadership, oversight, and coordination for our graduate and undergraduate medical and dental education programs.  This role has a large administrative responsibility, with some significant policy implications for health profession education.  For me, it is important that I continue to care for our nations’ veterans through exce...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - May 22, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Editorial Board Q & A Featured bias Department of Veterans Affairs interprofessional education leadership medical education Source Type: blogs

A Hippocratic Oath for technology
Modern technology needs to do better. This is the message delivered by every CEO after every Silicon Valley scandal in recent memory. This time, they should really do it. Medicine can show them how. Let’s have the professionals building our future abide by industry-wide standards, just as doctors do. As both a startup founder and a physician, this idea makes intuitive sense to me. Drawing on my experience treating patients and running a digital platform, here’s what a Hippocratic Oath for tech might look like. First, it shouldn’t say “first do no harm.” Not that I’m in favor of doin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/joshua-landy" rel="tag" > Joshua Landy, MD < /a > Tags: Tech Mobile health Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Should Be Invisible
What if healthcare worked as an unseeable fairy mother with a swarm of digital helpers? In the background, many digital tools, smart algorithms, health trackers and wearables would work for your well-being discreetly, you could be sure that you are taken care of, but you would only sense that on rare occasions. How would you fancy the invisible healthcare system? The Medical Futurist believes that we should move in that direction. Healthcare should be what Zorg showed us in The Fifth Element Do you remember the scene from the brilliant Luc Besson movie, The Fifth Element, where Gary Oldman as one of the leading antagonist...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 22, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design AI artificial intelligence chatbot digital health health chatbot health trackers healthcare system Innovation robotics sensors technology VR wearables Source Type: blogs

What Is the Significance of the Roche Acquisition of Flatiron?
People are talking about the acquisition ofFlatiron Health by Roche. Here is an article fromForbes that discusses the possible rationale for the purchase (see:The Flatiron Health Acquisition Is A Shot In The Arm For Roche's Oncology Real-World Evidence Needs) and below is an excerpt from the article:...Roche, a global pharmaceutical giant, [has] acquired Flatiron Health, an oncology-focused electronic health records (EHR) company, for $1.9 billion....[Flatiron] has a partnership with a large network of oncology clinics and a few major research facilities to gather patient data. While it was not entirely unexpected...
Source: Lab Soft News - May 22, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Electronic Health Record (EHR) Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Medical Research Pharmaceutical Industry Source Type: blogs

Prolific U.S. Inventor Prof. Esther Sans Takeuchi Named European Inventor Award Finalist (Interview)
In the category of Non-EPO countries, the European Patent Office (EPO) named U.S. Inventor Prof. Esther Sans Takeuchi a finalist for the 2018 European Inventor Award. Sans Takeuchi is being recognized for her work developing a battery that increases the lifespan of implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) fivefold, effectively reducing the need for multiple replacement surgeries. Her contributions not only advanced the field of chemistry through the compact lithium/silver vanadium oxide (Li/SVO) battery, but also increased the acceptance of ICDs beginning in the 1980s. Compact, implantable ICD battery Sans Takeuchi’...
Source: Medgadget - May 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: May 22, 2018
We all have different strengths, skills and tools to support us during difficult life events. What do you pull from when things get hard? New challenges forces us to develop new ways of building hope, support and resilience. Support groups online and in person, for example, can help us feel less alone. Therapy can give us individualized treatment and teach us ways to also feel supported. Books and blog posts can provide an alternative view. What tools can support you during these challenging moments? What skills can you develop to add to your list? This week’s top posts on dealing with a major life event, sleeping be...
Source: World of Psychology - May 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brandi-Ann Uyemura, M.A. Tags: Best of Our Blogs Source Type: blogs

How To Avoid The Golden Handcuffs
You're reading How To Avoid The Golden Handcuffs, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Picture this: You are sitting in a huge office with your own private secretary. Everyone calls you "sir" or 'madam' and as you peer out the window you can catch a glimpse of your brand new Porsche. This great feeling lasts for only a second until the onset of a grim reality sets in. Your email is reaching its quota with messages you haven't yet read. Your phone is ringing non-stop and you assume it's going to be ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pragesh Tags: career featured happiness self improvement find your passion golden handcuffs pickthebrain success Source Type: blogs