Incarceration is likely to increase HIV and HCV transmission among people who inject drugs, new study finds
Injecting drug use, through the sharing of needles, syringes and other injecting equipment, is a primary route of transmission for both HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV), blood-borne infections that cause considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. New research led by the University of Bristol has found among people who inject drugs, that recent incarceration was associated with an 81 per cent and 62 per cent increase in HIV and HCV acquisition risk, respectively. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - October 30, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research Source Type: news

Surgical training startup FundamentalVR inks deal with Mayo Clinic, raises additional $1.4M
London-based FundamentalVR plans to work with the Mayo Clinic to develop new simulations and validate its technology.   (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - October 30, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about HPV and fertility
The human papillomavirus (HPV) can negatively affect fertility in both men and women. In this article, learn about the possible risks and how to improve the outcome. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Fertility Source Type: news

Let ’s Talk about Health Workers’ Feelings
October 30, 2018Conversations between health workers and members of key populations can transform the health care experience for both.It is easy to forget that doctors, nurses, and other health care workers are just like everyone else. They even have feelings.At a recent Health4All training, a social worker in Suriname explained, “Health workers say that they don’t want to put aside their upbringing or values, and they don’t want to say ‘ma’am’ when you are a biological man. They say, ‘If you have a name like Trixie, I will call you Trixie, but I will not call you ma’am....
Source: IntraHealth International - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Prevent Biometrics acquires X2 Biosystems head impact monitoring assets
Head impact monitoring tech developer Prevent Biometrics said last week it acquired the head impact monitoring assets of Seattle-based X2 Biosystems for an undisclosed amount. Minneapolis-based Prevent Biometrics, which spun-out of the Cleveland Clinic in 2015, said that the acquisition will bring together its own Impact Monitor Mouthguard and X2’s skin patch-based platform. Prevent Biometrics said that it is working with the U.S. Military to further develop head impact monitoring solutions for training and combat situations “The opportunity to add X2’s patents and engineering know how is an exceptional o...
Source: Mass Device - October 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Mergers & Acquisitions Patient Monitoring preventbiometrics x2biosystems Source Type: news

New Concerns About Sesame Allergies
(CNN) — Sesame could become the newest allergen added to the list of foods required to be named on labels, US Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb announced Monday. Eight major food allergens must currently be declared on US labeling using their common names: milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybeans. These foods accounted for over 90% of documented serious food allergies in the country when the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, which required the clear labeling of ingredients, was passed in 2004. The FDA cites the undeclared presence of allergens as...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Allergies Local TV Sesame Source Type: news

New Evidence Pot May Harm the Teen Brain
TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 -- Teens who stop smoking pot can think and learn better afterward, even if they are only light users, a new study reports. Compared to teenagers and young adults who continued using marijuana, those who abstained for a month... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Surgery students struggle to use their hands because they spent too much time watching TV
Roger Kneebone, professor of surgical education at Imperial College London, claims young medics struggle to stitch up patients due to them missing out on crafts when they were younger. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Budget 2018: Treasury slashes small business apprenticeships fee
GP practices taking on apprentices will only have to pay 5% towards the costs of training and assessing them instead of 10%, the Government has revealed as part of the budget announcement.  Speaking in Parliament yesterday, chancellor Philip Hammond said the Government has released a‘£695m package to support apprenticeships’. Hide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - October 30, 2018 Category: Practice Management Authors: vfiore Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Finance Practice development Latest News Source Type: news

Therapeutic Lifestyle Intervention in Church Helpful for BP Control
TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 -- A therapeutic lifestyle change (TLC) intervention plus motivational interviewing (MINT) sessions delivered in churches can reduce systolic blood pressure (BP) among blacks compared with health education (HE) alone,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 30, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can aloe vera gel help treat eczema?
Aloe vera is a natural plant-based moisturizer with antibacterial properties. In this article, learn about how aloe vera gel can help treat eczema. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Atopic Dermatitis / Eczema Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about laparoscopy for infertility
Laparoscopy is a minimally invasive procedure doctors use to diagnose a variety of conditions, including some that can cause infertility. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Fertility Source Type: news

Liberia:Liberia Medical and Dental Council Boss Underscores Medical Training for Health Practitioners
[FrontPageAfrica] Monrovia -The Chairperson of the Liberia Medical and Dental Council (LMDC), Dr. Linda Birch has underscored the need for health practitioners in Liberia to undergo continuous capacity building trainings to be proficient in the discharge of their duties. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 30, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Centrifugation-based Cell Separation Using the Accuspin-Histopaque System
Learn about the ACCUSPIN system, the difference between types of Histopaque gradient media, and additional products for centrifugation-based cell separation! (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 30, 2018 Category: Science Tags: The Marketplace The Scientist Source Type: news

Naps Don't Help Down Syndrome Kids Learn: Study
Title: Naps Don't Help Down Syndrome Kids Learn: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 10/29/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/30/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General - October 30, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Machine learning can predict stroke treatment outcomes
Making use of imaging features and demographic information, machine-learning...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 5 reasons why imaging AI is different from CAD Deep learning improves detection of cerebral aneurysms ASTRO: AI's rad therapy future is in predicting outcomes AI effective for assessing breast density AI can prescreen head CT studies for urgent findings (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 30, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Understanding the value of RVUs in radiology
What exactly are relative value units (RVUs), and how do they affect payment...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: A review of ACR comments on MPFS proposed rule for 2019 How Medicare fee schedule changes will affect radiology How patient consumerism affects today's radiology practice Billing for off-campus hospital outpatient departments First steps toward APM participation for radiologistsComments: 10/30/2018 3:27:40 AMDr.Sardonicus (oh how I despise RVU's) Quote from The initial focus was to determine a relative value, ultimately called a relative value unit, of the service-specific work component to...
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 30, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Why evaluate one-week-delayed verbal recall in patients with severe traumatic brain injury? - Manoli R, Chartaux-Danjou L, Delecroix H, Daveluy W, Moroni C.
PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to propose new measures to evaluate memory processes in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this purpose, we analyzed learning and consolidation processes depending on own patient's performance... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: TBI Source Type: news

Visual biofeedback training reduces quantitative drugs index scores associated with fall risk - Anson E, Thompson E, Karpen SC, Odle BL, Seier E, Jeka J, Panus PC.
OBJECTIVE: Drugs increase fall risk and decrease performance on balance and mobility tests. Conversely, whether biofeedback training to reduce fall risk also decreases scores on a published drug-based fall risk index has not been documented. Forty-eight co... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

What occupational and physical therapists know about farmers' health - Hildebrand MW, Brinkley J, Timmons S, Mendez F.
PURPOSE: Farmers are at high risk for losing their occupation because of their susceptibility for developing chronic conditions and incurring injuries. Although, occupational and physical therapists have basic education in return-to-work methods, specialty... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news

HRSA: Meeting of the National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice
The National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP) will hold a public meeting on November 19, 2018 to discuss areas where nursing can lead the transition of healthcare toward one emphasizing value and quality of care, which is also the focus on the Council's 15th annual report to the Secretary. (Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - October 30, 2018 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

More Than 90% of Generation Z Is Stressed Out. And Gun Violence Is Partly To Blame
Gun violence, political turmoil and personal problems are causing significant stress among America’s teenagers and youngest adults, according to a new report. Members of Gen Z — people ages 15 to 21 — reported the worst mental health of any generation included in the American Psychological Association’s annual Stress in America report, which was based on almost 3,500 interviews with people ages 18 and older, plus 300 interviews with teenagers ages 15 to 17. Just 45% of those in Gen Z reported “excellent” or “very good” mental health, compared to 56% of Millennials, 51% of Gen...
Source: TIME: Health - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Army, university study suggests brain structure could influence behavior
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) New research focusing on how brain structure may impact brain activity and ultimately human behavior could one day lead to technology that can be catered to an individual Soldier in a training environment or operational setting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insilico to present its research in AI at BioCentury China Healthcare Summit
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) The CEO of Insilico Medicine, Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD will present Insilico's latest results in the generation of novel small molecule leads using the Generative Adversarial Networks and Reinforcement Learning, as well as the multi-modal biomarkers of human aging and age-related diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Report outlines priorities to improve the lives of cancer survivors and caregivers
(American Cancer Society) A new report from the American Cancer Society creates a set of critical priorities for care delivery, research, education, and policy to equitably improve survivor outcomes and support caregivers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

99-year-old UCLA education professor shares lessons from a life well-lived
UCLA Broadcast StudioJohn McNeil, UCLA professor emeritus of education, came to UCLA in 1956 to lead the teacher education program. While growing up in Iowa, John McNeil experienced some pretty harsh winters. However, at the age of 8, he learned that other children had it worse than he did.“This was a lesson I learned in the 3rd grade,” McNeil recalled. “It was cold as the dickens in Iowa, below zero. My mother had put a string on my mittens so I wouldn’t lose them. I hung them up in the cloakroom [at school], these brand-new mittens. And then one day, they weren’t there. I got angry beca...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 30, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Surgery students 'losing dexterity to stitch patients'
A surgery professor expresses fears over the consequences of a generation more adept at using screens. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surgical students increasingly lack dexterity skills for surgery
School curriculum lack of focus on crafts mean young people struggle with practical skills, professor of surgical education warns Related items fromOnMedica Extra places on ‘innovative’ courses to train more GPs Drive to have general practice given speciality status Nurses hit by student loans errors GMC offers new guidance for disabled students Doctors bear burden of Government ’s financial failure (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - October 30, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Universities Begin Redesigning Their Programs to Make Training of Future School Principals More Effective
Seven universities are beginning to change their principal preparation programs to better reflect the real-world demands of the job. They are working with local high-need school districts that hire their graduates as well as accreditation agencies in their states. (Source: RAND)
Source: RAND - October 30, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: news

Incarceration is likely to increase HIV and HCV transmission among people who inject drugs, new study finds
Injecting drug use, through the sharing of needles, syringes and other injecting equipment, is a primary route of transmission for both HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV), blood-borne infections that cause considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. New research led by the University of Bristol has found among people who inject drugs, that recent incarceration was associated with an 81 per cent and 62 per cent increase in HIV and HCV acquisition risk, respectively. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - October 29, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Health, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Population Health Sciences, Institutes, Bristol Population Health Science Institute; Press Release Source Type: news

Why giving over 60s judo lessons could keep them out of hospital
One in five over-60s suffers a fracture when they fall, with up to 75,000 older people admitted to hospital every year with a fractured hip - but they can all learn how to fall 'safely'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Training teams sent to centers amid deadly viral outbreaks
New Jersey health officials are sending infection-control teams to four long-term pediatric centers and a hospital to assist with training amid viral and bacterial outbreaks that killed a combined 10 people (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - October 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Arizona Education Board Adopts Science Standards that Include Evolution
The Arizona State Board of Education has adopted revised science standards that affirm the teaching of evolution and climate change science in high schools state-wide. The decision came after public outcry from parents, teachers, and the scientific community over a last-minute proposal to remove references to evolution and climate change. AIBS commented in a letter to the Board; expressing concern that the draft standards “fail to properly address important aspects of evolution science and remove climate change science from the high school curricula.” AIBS asked the Board to revisit the standards and rely on ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 29, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Develop the Skills Required to Secure Employment
Registration is now open for the Employment Acquisition Skills Boot Camp for Scientists, a new professional development program by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate programs in the United States do an excellent job of preparing students for careers in academia. As students and a growing number of reports note, however, many STEM graduate students are interested in employment in a variety of sectors by the time they complete their degree. Students continue to report that they feel ill-prepared and ill-equipped to pursue employment in thes...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 29, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Enhance your Interdisciplinary and Team Science Skills
Reports abound from professional societies, the Academies, government agencies, and researchers calling attention to the fact that science is increasingly an inter-disciplinary, transdisciplinary, inter-institutional, and international endeavor. In short, science has become a “team sport.” There is a real and present need to better prepare scientists for success in this new collaborative environment. The American Institute of Biological Sciences is responding to this call with a new program for scientists, educators, and individuals who work with or participate in scientific teams. Team science is increasingl...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 29, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Become an Advocate for Science: Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center
Quick, free, easy, effective, impactful! Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center. The Legislative Action Center is a one-stop shop for learning about and influencing science policy. Through the website, users can contact elected officials and sign-up to interact with lawmakers. The website offers tools and resources to inform researchers about recent policy developments. The site also announces opportunities to serve on federal advisory boards and to comment on federal regulations. This new tool is made possible through contributions from the Society for the Study of Evolution and the Botanical Society of America. AIBS an...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 29, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Winning Competition Entry Could Improve Documentation Process for Administering Drugs
Vetter, a global contract development and manufacturing organization based in Ravensburg, Germany, has announced the winner of its first Open Innovation Challenge — Injection 2.0. The competition, which kicked off in June, brought together four different teams to submit ideas on how digital trends can be used to develop innovative and sustainable solutions for new drug injection therapies. Claudia Roth, vice president of innovation management at Vetter, said the competition was designed to help the company explore new pathways to further the development of the injection process. Sh...
Source: MDDI - October 29, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kristopher Sturgis Tags: Contract Manufacturing Digital Health Source Type: news

Scenes from the Graduate Entry Prespeciality in Nursing award celebrations
On Friday, Oct. 26, the Yale School of Nursing held its annual GEPN award ceremony, followed by the yearly Fall Fest celebration at the Landscape Lab. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - October 29, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Considering Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement?
Treatment TermsTAVR Sub-Title Questions to Ask Your Doctor About TAVR Overview Many doctors and hospitals now offer transcatheter aortic valve replacement for aortic valve disease, but their experience and success rates vary. Here ’s what you need to know before choosing where to have TAVR. Content Blocks CTA ButtonTAVR CTA Header Learn More About Hero Imageblog_tavr_1932x862.jpeg Preview Image Featured Doctors and Providers Jeffrey G. Gaca, MD Donald D. Glower Jr., MD J. Kevin Harrison, MD G. Chad Hughes IV, MD Todd L. Kiefer, MD Ryan P. Plichta, MD Richard M. Sabulsky Jr., PA Tina D. Tailor, MD ...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - October 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

How salt can trigger inflammation in multiple sclerosis
Cells in a high-salt environment show activation of the beta-catenin/Wnt signaling pathway, which disrupts regulatory T cells and triggers inflammation. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - October 29, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Using the Microbiome to Help Premature Babies Grow
A study suggests that the gut microbiome – the trillions of tiny bacteria that live in the digestive tract – could help doctors personalize nutrients and feeding patterns to help the most vulnerable babies get a stronger start to life. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - October 29, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

New Research Initiative to Focus on Cerebrovascular Diseases
A multidisciplinary group of clinical and bench researchers has been formed at the University of Rochester Medical Center to study cerebrovascular disease. The Cerebrovascular and Neurocognitive Research Group (CNRG), which consists of faculty from Neurology, Neurosurgery, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microbiology and Immunology, and Vascular Biology will leverage advanced brain imaging technologies to investigate a number of diseases, including stroke, cerebral small vessel disease, and vascular dementia. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - October 29, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

Study: Attention Requires Balance in the Brain
The ability to focus attention is a fundamental challenge that the brain must solve and one that is essential to navigating our daily lives. In developmental disorders such as Autism this ability is impaired. New research published in the journal Nature Communications shows that nerve cells maintain a state of balance when preparing to interpret what we see and this may explain why the healthy brain can block out distractions. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - October 29, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

Here are the hottest Bay Area startups from the third quarter
The Bay Area startup with the biggest valuation jump in the third quarter is a pet project of Social Capital chief Chamath Palihapitiya and a pair of ex-Googlers. Not much is know about what Palo Alto-based Groq Inc. is up to, other than that it's developing a tensor processing unit, the type of chip designed specifically for machine learning. Groq Chief Technology Officer Jonathan Ross is a hardware engineer who co-founded the Google unit that developed i ts machine learning chip. CEO Douglas Wightman… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - October 29, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Cromwell Schubarth Source Type: news

Two-cells-in-one combo could be platform to bolster leukemia treatment
Researchers led by a UCLA bioengineer have developed a therapy — based on two types of cells joined into a single unit — that could help strengthen existing treatments for acute myeloid leukemia. One of the cells is a blood platelet that carries a drug that attacks cancer cells; the other is a stem cell that guides the platelet into bone marrow, the spongy tissue inside bone where new blood cells are made and where leukemia begins. The researchers found that when injected into mice that had acute myeloid leukemia, the combination therapy halted the disease from developing any further. Of the mice that rece...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 29, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Development of the Brief Addiction Therapist Scale (BATS)
Key findings A literature review and three-round Delphi survey facilitated the development of a Brief Addiction Therapist Scale (BATS), designed to evaluate the delivery of substance use treatment in routine practice. Practitioner feedback, and validation in four clinical samples including two multi-site studies, suggests the scale has good psychometric properties and high inter-rater reliability. In initial feedback practitioners and experts have been positive, supporting its utility, ease of use and importance. Research team Dr Gillian Tober, Head of Research and Training Leeds Addiction Unit, Leeds and York Partnersh...
Source: Alcohol Research UK - October 29, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: admin Tags: Alcohol Insights Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Do people inherit rheumatoid arthritis?
While researchers do not know exactly what causes rheumatoid arthritis (RA), they do know that heredity plays a role. Learn more about RA and genetics here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rheumatoid Arthritis Source Type: news

Medical News Today: 11 healthful alternatives to wheat bread
Many people need to or wish to avoid or reduce the bread they eat that contains wheat. Fortunately, there are many healthful and tasty alternatives without wheat that they can choose. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Methotrexate and folic acid for rheumatoid arthritis
Doctors sometimes prescribe methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but it can lead to folic acid deficiencies. Learn more about managing this and other side effects. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rheumatoid Arthritis Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Eczema on the lips: Causes and treatment
Eczema on the lips, also called eczematous cheilitis, causes painful cracked skin on this part of the body. Learn about the causes, symptoms, and treatments here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Atopic Dermatitis / Eczema Source Type: news