Friends, foes, and self-defence: students with EBD navigating social conflicts and bullying - Pereira LC, Lavoie J.
Students with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) are more likely to struggle than their peers, which can lead to disengagement and early dropout. Although there are alternate programmes for these students, they are rarely consulted about their st... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Inside the ebony tower - James V.
James reports on her research on the reporting of incidents of sexual assault on the part of students attending an historically black college--the "ebony tower" that is mentioned in the title of this article. On the whole, her findings are consistent with ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Listening to young people with learning disabilities who have experienced, or are at risk of, child sexual exploitation in the UK - Franklin A, Smeaton E.
This paper reports on a UK study which examined the identification of, and support for young people with learning disabilities who experience, or are at risk of, child sexual exploitation (CSE). CSE has received considerable attention in the UK, with evide... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Improving aircraft safety and reliability by aircraft maintenance technician training - Dalkilic S.
Aircraft maintenance is one of the primary causes or contributing factors in aircraft accidents. It is clear that proper training of Aircraft Maintenance Technicians (AMTs) will avoid failures, reduce maintenance related accidents, improve safety and relia... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

New medicare model produces expert nurses to address shortage of primary care
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) In an article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania researchers call for modernizing the way Medicare pays for training nurses, and highlight a successful new model of cost-effectively training more advanced practice nurses to practice community-based primary care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The seed that could bring clean water to millions
(College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University) Carnegie Mellon University's Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering Professors Bob Tilton and Todd Przybycien recently co-authored a paper with Ph.D. students Brittany Nordmark and Toni Bechtel, and alumnus John Riley, further refining a process that could soon help provide clean water to many in water-scarce regions. The process, created by Tilton's former student and co-author Stephanie Velegol, uses sand and plant materials readily available in many developing nations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The world's tiniest first responders
(University of Southern California) Amid the rise of CRISPR and genome editing, scientists are still learning more about DNA repair and its significance in aging and diseases such as cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Forgetting may help improve memory and learning
(American Physiological Society) Forgetting names, skills or information learned in class is often thought of as purely negative. However unintuitive it may seem, research suggests that forgetting plays a positive role in learning: It can actually increase long-term retention, information retrieval and performance. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS's) Institute on Teaching and Learning in Madison, Wis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dogs understand what's written all over your face
(Springer) Dogs are capable of understanding the emotions behind an expression on a human face. The study in Springer's journal Learning& Behavior is the latest to reveal just how connected dogs are with people. The research also provides evidence that dogs use different parts of their brains to process human emotions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Project Population: Addressing Asia ’s Ageing Societies
A seventy-year-old woman laughs with family members inside a grocery store in Tachilek, Myanmar. UN Photo/Kibae ParkBy Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Jun 20 2018 (IPS)While populations have seen and undergone changes since the beginning of time, one trend in particular is unfolding across the world: less children, older people. In an effort to tackle the complex issue in Asia, government officials are convening to help create a sustainable society where no one is left behind.In Mongolia’s capital of Ulaanbaatar, 40 Members of Parliament (MPs) are gathering to discuss sound policy approaches to population issues...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs aging Asian Population and Development Association (APDA) Population Growth Source Type: news

Infographic: Adult congenital heart disease
Learn more about adult congenital heart disease. Other health tip infographics:?mayohealthhighlights.startribune.com? (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - June 20, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mountain-dwellers near Everest have forearms 1cm shorter than lowland people, study finds
Researchers led by Cambridge University PhD student Stephanie Payne compared the length of people arms in Nepal and found those living at altitude have significantly shorter forearms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Good social media experiences don't outweigh bad ones for young adults
(Reuters Health) - For young adults, the adverse effect of negative social media experiences on mental health outweigh any potential benefits of positive experiences, a study of university students suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

New 3D CT technique tops x-ray for diagnosing arthritis
Researchers from the U.K. have developed an algorithm capable of detecting...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Novel PET tracer could help assess arthritis Automated 3D US effective for diagnosing hip dysplasia Deep learning can enable quantitative MRI for arthritis 4D CT of subtalar joint aids ankle instability assessment JAAOS: X-ray still best for knee pain screening (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Why Trump ’s ‘Space Force’ Won’t — and Shouldn’t — Happen
Good government is often unglamorous stuff—fixing pot holes, plowing snow, collecting trash. At a White House event on June 18, President Trump was supposed to deliver a brief address on the trash-collecting part. Yes, the junk in question is in space—the growing belt of debris that has been accumulating in Earth orbit since the very beginning of the space age and poses an increasing risk to satellites and other spacecraft. But it’s still just trash, and managing it was the focus of Trump’s latest Space Policy Directive—the third he has signed since taking office. As Trump has been known to do...
Source: TIME: Science - June 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Funding Awarded to the University of North Dakota ’ s Information Needs Assessment Project
The GMR office is happy to announce the funding of the Information Needs Assessment of Unaffiliated North Dakota Rural Health Professionals & Biomedical Researchers project at the University of North Dakota via our Health Information Outreach award. Project: Description:  This is the last phase of a multi part effort to provide North Dakota unaffiliated health professionals and biomedical researchers with access to a variety of information resources, including those not freely available.  Evidence-based workshops and train-the-trainer sessions will be implemented to meet the information needs of tar...
Source: The Cornflower - June 19, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Sam Watson Tags: Funding Success Stories Source Type: news

Smoking Rates In U.S. Hit All-Time Low, CDC Says
NEW YORK (CBS Local/CBS News) – Smoking in the U.S. has hit another all-time low. About 14 percent of U.S adults admit to being smokers last year, down from about 16 percent in 2016, government figures from the CDC show. There hadn’t been much change the previous two years, but it’s been clear there’s been a general decline and the new figures show it’s continuing, according to K. Michael Cummings of the tobacco research program at Medical University of South Carolina. “Everything is pointed in the right direction,” including falling cigarette sales and other indicators, Cummi...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Local TV Smoking talkers Source Type: news

Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering: 2017 (Data update)
Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering (S&E) provides the latest information about the participation of these groups in S&E higher education and employment. These updated data cover occupations, salaries, employment status, and disability status. (Source: NSF - Statistics on U.S. Science and Engineering Resources)
Source: NSF - Statistics on U.S. Science and Engineering Resources - June 19, 2018 Category: Statistics Source Type: news

Collaborating with WHO for evidence-informed nutrition guidelines
The World Health Organization (WHO) Department of Nutrition for Health and Development (NHD) develops evidence-informed guidance on effective actions to address all forms of malnutrition; establishes standards and harmonizes methodologies; and increases public awareness about the WHO policy recommendations.   WHO is Cochrane's largest external partner and we have been collaborating with   them to prioritize and produce systematic reviews that contribute to their nutrition-related guidelines. WHO has recently released a document that outlines their continuous quality improvements. This document includes infor...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - June 19, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Understanding observational learning: Why we are able to learn from other people's mistakes
(Natural News) Humans learn from mistakes – but those errors don’t have to be their own, an article in Science Daily states. The ability to learn from the experiences of other people is called observational learning. A study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has identified the unique brain circuit that enables this secondhand learning. The... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Food Sustainability, Migration, Nutrition and Women
By Enrique YevesROME, Jun 19 2018 (IPS)We worry about how we can continue to put food on our tables; and yet one-third of food is never eaten, instead being lost or wasted.We worry about eating properly, and yet in many countries , poor nutrition, obesity and micronutrient deficiencies are increasingly common. This trend is taking place in the Americas, Oceania, Asia, Africa and in Europe. Enrique YevesWe want to empower women and girls, yet in every sector we still see serious disparities in terms of equal pay for equal wages and getting more women into senior management positions. We worry about the mass movement of peop...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Enrique Yeves Tags: Crime & Justice Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Food Sustainability Gender Global Globalisation Green Economy Headlines Health Human Rights Labour Migration & Refugees N Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How to treat a burn on the roof of the mouth at home
Burning the roof of the mouth is common. These burns are easy to treat at home and rarely cause for concern. Natural remedies can help, including yogurt, milk, aloe vera gel, and honey. Here, learn about seven natural home remedies for burns on the roof of the mouth. We also describe when to see a doctor. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

Fewer American Adults Are Smoking Than Ever Before
Smoking rates among U.S. adults have hit an all-time low, new estimates say. Approximately 14% of American adults said they were smokers last year, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). While that’s still a significant number, encompassing more than 30 million Americans, it’s down from 16% the year before and roughly 20% in 2006. It’s also a significant drop-off from rates recorded around 50 years ago, which topped 40% by some estimates. Today, men are more likely to smoke than women, according to responses to the NCHS&r...
Source: TIME: Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

High rates of HIV and diabetes raise the risk of TB for South Africans
The heightened TB risk is likely due to the delayed immune response in people with diabetes, and the overall suppressed immunity in those living with HIV. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - June 19, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Further education colleges in crisis
UNISON vowed to continue to fight for further education jobs and to negotiate the best conditions for workers in the face of drastic and on-going cuts. Local government conference heard that with more than 30,000 UNISON members working in further education and sixth form colleges across the UK, there continues to be concerns about the future of FE provision. A recent National Audit office report revealed that more than half of all colleges are in deficit and could face an uncertain future. This is despite the sector having lost one million learners since 2009 and 16 to 18s receiving the same funding as they did in 1990. &l...
Source: UNISON Health care news - June 19, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: Martin Cullen Tags: Article 2018 Local Government Conference further education northern region Source Type: news

Curricular Evolution: Geisel School of Medicine Embarks on a New Integrated Curriculum
Geisel’s recently approved integrated curriculum creates a cohesive pedagogical approach throughout all four years, building on the medical school’s strong foundation in biomedical sciences and clinical competence. It also creates expanded clinical opportunities in the fourth year. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - June 19, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Susan Green Tags: Education Insider News curriculum medical education Source Type: news

How alcohol protects the heart: Scientists discover moderate drinking toughens up heart cells
Researchers at the University of S ão Paulo discovered the body's reaction to drinking alcohol is similar to its reaction during a heart attack, so alcohol could help the body learn to protect itself. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

State of the art imaging challenges our understanding of how platelets are made
Correlative light-electron microscopy is being used to increase our knowledge of how platelets are made in the body and the results are challenging previously held understandings. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - June 19, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience Source Type: news

Sodickson: ISMRM can play sheriff in AI's Wild West
The imaging artificial intelligence (AI) landscape is like the Wild West right...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Is artificial intelligence vulnerable to cyberattacks? Deep learning accurately detects brain hemorrhage SIIM: AI can accurately detect cerebral microbleeds Live from SIIM 2018: AI and value-based healthcare Live from SIIM 2018: From pen and ink to AI in radiology (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

New technique fine-tunes treatment for severe epilepsy cases
A new advance in magnetoencephalography may be able to help surgeons more precisely target regions of the brain associated with epileptic seizures. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - June 19, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Algorithm Predicts Very Low Blood Pressure During Surgery
TUESDAY, June 19, 2018 -- A machine-learning algorithm can predict hypotension during surgery based on high-fidelity arterial pressure waveform analysis, according to a study published online June 11 in Anesthesiology. Feras Hatib, Ph.D., from... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Student, 22, in early 'menopause' due to injections to alleviate endometriosis symptoms
Katy Johnson, 22, from Aberdeen, was diagnosed with stage four endometriosis in January. She now has injections that will stop her ovulating for a year to give her ovaries 'a break'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Improved single visit management of old infected iatrogenic root perforations using Biodentine ®
ConclusionsIn single visit treatments, Biodentine seems to provide a biocompatible and effective seal in acidic environment, in accidental root perforations, even if the treatment is performed by an inexperienced operator and regardless of the location, the size and the time of occurrence of the perforation. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - June 19, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

American Medical Association goes all-in for gun control, turning doctors into police state enforcers
(Natural News) The American Medical Association (AMA) is a powerful organization that defines medical education and medical practice in the U.S. The organization creates policies for all physicians to follow and they can threaten a doctor’s medical license if they do not follow along. In 2018, the AMA has decided to support gun control as... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about peripheral vascular disease
Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is when there is restricted blood flow to the limbs. Symptoms usually affect the legs, causing pain, cramps, and pale or blue skin. People who are over 50, have diabetes, or smoke cigarettes are more at risk of PVD. Read on to learn about the causes, symptoms, and treatment for PVD. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Improving Rural Oral Healthcare Access (May 2018)
This policy brief seeks to discuss the oral and systemic health connection, explores the current dental shortage, highlights the need for interprofessional education and identifies recommendations for improving rural oral health access to care. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When tragedy strikes: Reflections on the NHS response to the Manchester Arena bombing and Grenfell Tower fire
This document summarise interviews to capture learning from the NHS response to these events in 2017 and draws out key issues for leaders to consider (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Company at forefront of sound revolution awarded prestigious Royal Academy fellowship
Dr Mihai Caleap, Senior Researcher in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Chief Executive Officer of revolutionary sound technology company, Metasonics, has been awarded a Royal Academy of Engineering Fellowship to develop and grow the business. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - June 19, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Grants and Awards; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Civil, Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Civil, Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Source Type: news

University appoints new Director of Estates
The University of Bristol has appointed a new Director of Estates and Bursar to oversee the management and development of its diverse collection of buildings and grounds. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - June 19, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Announcements, Staff notices; Press Release Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What is perioral dermatitis and how is it treated?
Perioral dermatitis is a rash that affects the skin around the mouth. The cause is unknown, but research suggests that it is a reaction to the misuse of topical corticosteroids. Other triggers may include hormonal changes and allergic reactions. Learn more about perioral dermatitis and how to prevent and treat it here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

ESA announces the recipients of the 2017 Student Awards
(Ecological Society of America) The Ecological Society of America recognizes Michael T. Kohl, Benjamin J. Wilson, and Emily E. Ernst for awards for outstanding student research. The Murray F. Buell and E. Lucy Braun awards are given for exceptional presentations at the 102nd Annual Meeting of the Society in Portland, Oregon in August 2017. The Forest Shreve Research Fund award supports graduate or undergraduate student ecological research in the hot deserts of North America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Age limit for federal food assistance program impacts reading scores, learning
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Nearly 1 million children face food insecurity simply because they were born late in the year. No safety net coverage exists for these children when they age out of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and they are not yet eligible to attend kindergarten. Irma Arteaga, assistant professor in the Truman School of Public Affairs at the University of Missouri, has found that not only does the coverage gap impact overall food insecurity, it reduces reading scores at kindergarten entry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

D for danger! Speech sounds convey emotions
(Bocconi University) Individual speech sounds -- phonemes -- are statistically associated with negative or positive emotions in several languages, new research published in the journal Cognition by Bocconi Professor Zachary Estes, his Warwick colleague James Adelman and Bocconi student Martina Cossu shows. These associations help us quickly avoid dangers, because the phoneme-emotion associations are strongest at the beginning of the word and the phonemes that are spoken fastest tend to have a negative association (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teachers view immigrant, minority parents as less involved in their children's education
(University of Pennsylvania) A study from the University of Pennsylvania revealed that such perspectives from educators can end up hampering the academic trajectory of the students involved. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows approach can help English learners improve at math word problems
(University of Kansas) University of Kansas education professors have published a study showing that a comprehension-based strategy can help English learners improve their math word-problem solving abilities. The approach boosts reading comprehension and problem solving as well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diagnostics of genetic cardiac diseases using stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes
(University of Tampere) A new study by Professors Martti Juhola and Katriina Aalto-Set ä l ä of the University of Tampere in Finland demonstrates that with the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning, it is possible not only to accurately sort sick cardiac cell cultures from healthy ones, but also to differentiate between genetic cardiac diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Have Johns Hopkins Biomedical Engineering Students Solved The Nuisance Of Nasal Congestion?
A team of five biomedical engineering undergraduates at John Hopkins University (JHU) plan to manufacture and sell a device that they say would achieve the same effect as nasal reconstructive surgery for sufferers of chronic nasal obstruction - a condition that affects tens of millions of Americans. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robin Seaton Jefferson, Contributor Source Type: news

Summer Melt: Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?
As many as 40 percent of students who intend to go to college don't show up in the fall. Education researchers call this phenomenon "summer melt," and it has long been a puzzling problem.(Image credit: Hill Street Studios/Getty Images/Blend Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shankar Vedantam Source Type: news

Doctors Think a Woman ’s Tattoo May Have Been Causing Her Severe Leg Pain
Doctors in Scotland believe a woman’s large tattoo on her leg may have been the cause of her unexplained inflammation and severe leg pain. The authors of a report on the woman’s case, published in BMJ Case Reports, say it is a reminder to physicians that they should be mindful of their patients’ tattoos if they encounter unusual and unexplained symptoms. The 31-year-old woman was suffering a condition called inflammatory myopathy, which affected her left leg and caused pain severe enough to disrupt her sleep. The woman had a double lung transplant in 2009, and was taking drugs to suppress her immune syst...
Source: TIME: Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime tattoos Source Type: news

In the Loop: Sunshine and summer screen time
Summer break is underway for most students, which means new (or no) routines. Unfortunately, many kids are spending a bit too much of their newfound free time staring at a screen. Ah, summer. Blue skies, sunshine and ? screen time? If it feels like the online world is more attractive to your child than the [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - June 19, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news