Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Aksoy Labs combats the tsetse fly to protect Africa from sleeping sickness
Yale professor of Serap Aksoy ’s work to combat sleeping sickness in Africa has included mapping the genome of the tsetse fly and developing student workshops. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 15, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Arterys Receives First FDA Clearance for Broad Oncology Imaging Suite with Deep Learning
FDA clearance covers all solid tumors. Initial launch will include Liver AI and Lung AI oncology software to empower clinicians to quickly measure and track lesions and nodules in MRI and CT scans SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 15, 2018 -- (Healthcare Sales & Mark... Devices, Radiology, Oncology, FDA Arterys, imaging, artificial intelligence (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - February 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Guidance to support new ‘maternity safety champions’
Trust board members chosen to be “maternity safety champions” must ensure that midwives and their support staff receive all the training and resources they need, according to latest guidance. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - February 15, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Exclusive: Director resigns over 'complete governance breakdown'
A non-executive director at troubled Wirral University Teaching Hospital Foundation Trust has resigned with immediate effect amid a deepening crisis at the trust, including a “complete breakdown of relationships” at board level. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - February 15, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Nigeria:Nigerian Student Invents Procedure That Could Revolutionise Retinal Disease Diagnosis
[This Day] A Nigerian doctoral student at Brunel University London's Department of Computer Science, Bashir Dodo, has won the "Best Student Paper" award at the industry-leading BIOIMAGING 2018 conference in Portugal. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 15, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

DreaMed Diabetes wins CE Mark for insulin therapy management platform
DreaMed Diabetes has won CE Mark clearance for its Advisor Pro decision-support platform, designed to help healthcare professionals manage insulin therapy for their Type I diabetes patients. The company’s cloud-based platform provides personalized insulin treatment plans by combining data from insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors. Using machine learning techniques, the system analyzes all of the data it collects from connected devices to come up with an optimized insulin dosing treatment plan. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post DreaMed Diabetes wins CE Mark for ...
Source: Mass Device - February 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Diabetes Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Regulatory/Compliance DreaMed Diabetes Glooko Source Type: news

NEH and NLM Renew Partnership to Collaborate on Research, Education, and Career Initiatives
The National Library of Medicine (NLM), the world ’s largest medical library and a component of the National Institutes of Health, and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) have reaffirmed a partnership, originally established in 2012, to develop initiatives that explore the intersection of biomedical and humanities research. (Source: NLM General Announcements)
Source: NLM General Announcements - February 15, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Why People Are Swimming in Freezing Water
Forget dipping your toe in the deep end. In countries around the world, intrepid swimmers of all ages plunge into ice-cold waters for a thrill that can feel as sharp as daggers–and bragging rights that last all winter. Welcome to the fun and frigid world of cold-water swimming. The hobby is nothing new. It’s been around for centuries in chilly climes such as Russia and Finland, and people have been crossing the notoriously frosty, 21-mile-long English Channel without wet suits since at least the 1800s. The Coney Island Polar Bear Club hosted its first U.S. ocean dip in 1903. And while polar plunges have become ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized cold water swimming healthytime Longevity Source Type: news

Amish People Stay Healthy in Old Age. Here ’s Their Secret
Many people think of the Amish as living without. These devout communities, predominantly located in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana, go without cars, TVs, computers, phones or even the electricity needed to run so much of 21st century gadgetry. But what researchers who have studied them have found is what the Amish have a surplus of: good health in late life. The average American life expectancy is currently just under 79 years. Back in 1900, it was only 47, but for early–20th century Amish it was already greater than 70. Over the decades, most Americans have caught up in overall life expectancy, but the Amish still ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized amish communities healthytime Source Type: news

Inside One Couple ’s Experimental Treatment to Battle Alzheimer’s Disease
JoAnn Wooding is staring intently at the clear liquid dripping from a dark brown IV bag into her husband Peter’s arm. “Please be the drug, please be the drug,” she says. Married for more than 50 years, the Woodings are among the more than 5 million Americans who are facing Alzheimer’s disease, one of the most devastating diagnoses today. But instead of accepting the slow descent into memory loss, confusion and dementia, Peter–who has the disease–could be among the first to successfully stop that decline from happening. Peter, 77, is one of the 2,700 people around the world who are expect...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease healthytime Longevity Source Type: news

The Surprising Secrets to Living Longer — And Better
Old age demands to be taken very seriously–and it usually gets its way. It’s hard to be cavalier about a time of life defined by loss of vigor, increasing frailty, rising disease risk and falling cognitive faculties. Then there’s the unavoidable matter of the end of consciousness and the self–death, in other words–that’s drawing closer and closer. It’s the rare person who can confront the final decline with flippancy or ease. That, as it turns out, might be our first mistake. Humans are not alone in facing the ultimate reckoning, but we’re the only species–as far as we ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Longevity Source Type: news

Why Rock Climbing May Be the Ultimate Full-Body Workout
The muscles in your hips and torso strain to hold your lower half against the wall. You arch backward and extend one hand up to clasp the next hold—your thighs and calves burning with the effort of holding you steady and in balance. A moment later, when the tips of your fingers have secured their grip, there’s a wholesale shift in the muscles you call on to maintain your safe purchase on the climbing wall. Exercise is all about engaging your muscles—from your heart to your biceps and quads—and asking those muscles to perform work. And when it comes to activating and training a diverse range of muscl...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime Source Type: news

Learning from the Flint Water Crisis: Protecting the Public's Health During a Financial Emergency
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Network for Public Health Law. 01/2018 This 84-page report, co-authored by attorneys from the Network for Public Health Law and the University of Michigan School of Public Health, details why shortcomings in the structure and implementation of laws related to public health, safe drinking water, and emergency financial management failed to stop or mitigate the Flint water crisis. Along with key findings, the report provides recommendations to help prevent similar crises from happening in other communities. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Gaps in nurse training on care of learning disability patients
Non-specialist nurses need more training in caring for patients with learning disabilities in order to end the “scandal” of avoidable deaths, a charity has claimed in a new report, which also said two-thirds of health professionals wanted more training in the area. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - February 15, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Training needed in care of patients with learning disability
Non-specialist nurses need more training in caring for patients with learning disabilities in order to the end “scandal” of avoidable deaths, a charity has claimed in a new report, which also said two-thirds of health professionals wanted more training in the area. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - February 15, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Bizarre hiring practices prove how universities cease to be centers of knowledge and are now "social justice" indoctrination centers
(Natural News) Over the past several years, we’ve seen America’s universities essentially turn into social justice training camps, where teaching about diversity is more important than U.S. history and making sure that all students have a safe space to turn to is more important than making sure they have the skills they need to be... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Enabling works get underway to prepare for the new Temple Quarter Enterprise Campus
Enabling works have now started to prepare for the demolition of the former Royal Mail sorting office on Cattle Market Road, next to Temple Meads station to make way for the new University of Bristol Temple Quarter Enterprise Campus. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 15, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Staff notices, Announcements, Business and Enterprise; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Social Sciences and Law, Faculty of Social Sciences and Law, School of Economics, Finance and Management; Press Release Source Type: news

Doctors Don't Need to Redocument Students' EHR Entries: CMS Doctors Don't Need to Redocument Students' EHR Entries: CMS
Medicare will still require that teaching physicians verify students'documentation but will not ask them to redocument their work.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

Funding Tip 1 – Talk it through
Introducing a new service from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region – weekly funding tips will run from now until the middle of April. The first week of March, NNLM MAR will announce a new round of funding up to $19,000 for health information awareness and outreach projects in NY, NJ, PA and DE. Once we announce, you will have just a few weeks to submit an application. Now is the time to think about how you could increase knowledge of National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources amongst your co-workers, students, community partners, professional organization, or clients/pat...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - February 15, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kate Flewelling Tags: Funding Source Type: news

King's needs £223m DHSC loan this year, board reveals
A London teaching hospital has predicted it will need to borrow nearly a quarter of a billion pounds from the Department of Health and Social Care this financial year, it emerged yesterday. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - February 15, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Histopathological Challenges in Drug-induced Liver Injury Histopathological Challenges in Drug-induced Liver Injury
Learn how liver biopsy can provide valuable information about the severity of injury and overall morphological changes in suspected drug-induced liver injury. What challenges face the pathologist?Liver International (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

An Approach for Advanced Pharmacy Informatics Education An Approach for Advanced Pharmacy Informatics Education
In this commentary, the authors describe the advanced training needed by those PharmD students who wish to become specialists in health information technology as it relates to pharmacy.American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pharmacist Journal Article Source Type: news

Linda Sealy receives 2018 AAAS Mentor Award for Lifetime Achievement
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Linda Sealy, director of the Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity at Vanderbilt University, has been selected to receive the 2018 Lifetime Mentor Award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The distinction honors her work in recruiting and mentoring underrepresented minority students. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Student research team accelerates snow melt with 'Melt Mat'
(Virginia Tech) 'The idea for a thermal absorptive blanket is novel, but also very practical,' said Jonathan Boreyko, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering and mechanics and the team's faculty advisor. 'For novelty's sake, the team really needed to go for a journal publication. For practicality's sake, we went for a patent.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Alzheimer's drug repairs brain damage after alcohol binges in rodents
(Duke University Medical Center) A drug used to slow cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease could offer clues on how drugs might one day be able to reverse brain changes that affect learning and memory in teens and young adults who binge drink. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Induced pluripotent stem cells could serve as cancer vaccine, Stanford researchers say
(Stanford Medicine) Induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, are a keystone of regenerative medicine. Outside the body, they can be coaxed to become many different types of cells and tissues that can help repair damage due to trauma or disease. Now, a study in mice from the Stanford University School of Medicine suggests another use for iPS cells: training the immune system to attack or even prevent tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Zika Virus and Emerging Mosquito-Borne Diseases: The European Emergency Risk Communication Challenge; A Response Guide
World Health Organization, Regional Office for Europe. 09/2017 This 46-page manual and the associated app are designed to assist public health authorities in the World Health Organization (WHO) European Region communicate in response to possible outbreaks of the Zika virus, and other mosquito-borne diseases. The main objective of the guide is to enable European countries to learn from the experience of other regions on how to communicate about Zika, and apply these lessons to the European context. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Company Seeks to Combat Aging And Disease With AI And Deep Learning
It's what movies were made of nearly four decades ago. Today, Artificial Intelligence and deep learning could very well change the world through drug discovery and the eradication of disease. And one Baltimore-based company is betting on it. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robin Seaton Jefferson, Contributor Source Type: news

Public health dentists offer recommendations to better integrate oral health and primary care
In practice, policy and education, oral health care and primary health care have traditionally been considered separate. In an effort to change that, a group of public health dentists has issued recommendations on improving the integration of the two with a goal to influence policymakers, clinicians, educators and health researchers.In apaper, commissioned by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine ’s Roundtable on Health Literacy, experts found that additional work is needed to integrate primary care and oral health to provide more comprehensive and improved access to care.The authors, from theU...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 15, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Controlling learning and epilepsy together
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Scharfman, H. E. Tags: Neuroscience perspective Source Type: news

Health care education funding for postgraduate, dental hygiene and dental therapy students
From August 2018 new postgraduate pre-registration nursing, midwifery and allied health professional, and most new dental hygiene and dental therapy students will access loans from the Student Loans Company. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - February 15, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Presentation skills e-learning
Whatever your role, or the organisation you work in, effective presentation skills are an important part of your professional portfolio and will help to boost your career. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - February 15, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Greek life membership associated with binge drinking and marijuana use in later life
Photo by ©iStock.com/sturti A scientific study finds that close to half of residential fraternity members had symptoms of alcohol use disorder (AUD) by age 35, and that living in a fraternity or sorority at college is associated with continued binge drinking and marijuana use through early midlife... (Source: NIDA News)
Source: NIDA News - February 15, 2018 Category: Addiction Tags: Alcohol, College Students, College-Age and Young Adults, Marijuana, Prevention Research, Students, Women and Drugs, Young Adults Source Type: news

Gunman Kills at Least 17 in Florida High School Shooting
  PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) — A former student opened fire at a Florida high school Wednesday as classes were being dismissed, killing at least 17 people and sending scores of students running into the streets to escape the bullets.   Frantic parents rushed to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where SWAT team members and ambulances had surrounded the campus. Live footage showed emergency workers who appeared to be treating the wounded on sidewalks. "It is a horrific situation," Superintendent Robert Runcie said. "It is a horrible day for us." The 19-year-old suspect was taken into custody...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 14, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Terry Spencer, Kelli Kennedy, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Mass Casualty Incidents Source Type: news

Florida mass shooting: Another deranged individual obsessed with guns, violence and "resistance" (UPDATE, correction)
(Natural News) By now, you’ve probably heard that a horrific mass shooting tragedy has unfolded in a Florida school, where a former student returned to the school grounds and opened fire. So far, the death toll is 17. Note: The original version of this story cited the Miami Herald, which incorrectly identified the name of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Florida mass shooting: Another deranged Democrat obsessed with guns, violence and "resistance"
(Natural News) By now, you’ve probably heard that a horrific mass shooting tragedy has unfolded in a Florida school, where a former student returned to the school grounds and opened fire. So far, the death toll is 17. Because the fake news media always reports false “facts” to push a gun control narrative, it’s important... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Older Workers Can Learn New Skills
This article was adapted from AARP's Great Jobs for Everyone 50+: Finding Work That Keeps You Happy and Healthy … and Pays the Bills by Kerry Hannon (John Wiley& Sons, Inc., 2018), available at aarp.org/greatjobs and bookstores. Career moves often require a skill refresh, or in some cases, even a  ... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - February 14, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Mazor CEO: Robotics is Here to Stay
During Mazor Robotics' fourth-quarter earnings call, executives mentioned Medtronic almost as much as they mentioned their own company. And for good reason.  The company received 24 purchase orders for its Mazor X robotic system in the fourth quarter of 2017, and all but one of those orders came from Medtronic. Under a global distribution sale that occurred ahead of schedule last year, Medtronic has assumed exclusive global responsibility for Mazor X's commercial activity for spine surgery. Learn how to design a surgical robotic system from an expert in the field at BIOMEDevice Boston on April 18, 2018. Mazor CFO...
Source: MDDI - February 14, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Orthopedics Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Actions and Research
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can happen to anyone. And these types of injuries, which include concussions, contribute to a substantial number of emergency room visits (and even deaths) each year. Learn more about TBI, and the FDA's related research and regulatory activities. (Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates)
Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Susan Dentzer Discusses ACA Changes and Challenges
On Tuesday morning, Susan Dentzer D '77, president and CEO of the Network for Excellence in Health Innovation, and a member of Geisel’s Board of Overseers, gave an informative presentation at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center to Geisel fourth-year medical students, faculty and Dartmouth-Hitchcock staff entitled, “Not Dead Yet: Policy Lessons from the Effort to Repeal and Replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA).” (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - February 14, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Timothy Dean Tags: Insider News Source Type: news

Patient advocate: Learning to navigate the healthcare system akin to mastering a new language
When Kate Sheridan was 11 years old, a series of complications from Lyme Disease changed her life dramatically. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - February 14, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Bill & Melinda Gates: It's'Not Fair' We're So Wealthy; Criticize Trump On America First
Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates and wife Melinda Gates, whose foundation spends around $4 billion in developing countries and c.$500 million in the U.S., have issued their latest annual open letter covering education, climate change and politics, and voice concern over President Trump's policies. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Roger Aitken, Contributor Tags: NASDAQ:MSFT Source Type: news

Parents Find Kids' Weight Grades Hard to Swallow
About half of U.S. states have laws requiring schools to conduct BMI screenings among their students, according to a study published last year in Current Obesity Reports. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shooting at Florida High School; Numerous Fatalities Reported
PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) — The Latest on a shooting at a Florida high school (all times local): 4:25 p.m. A school official says there are numerous fatalities from the high school shooting in South Florida. Broward County Superintendent Robert Runcie says "There are numerous fatalities. It is a horrific situation." He added, "It is a horrible day for us." The Broward County Sheriff's Office tweeted Wednesday afternoon that "so far we have at least 14 victims." The tweet added: "Victims have been and continue to be transported to Broward Health Medical Center and Broward Health North hosp...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 14, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Mass Casualty Incidents Source Type: news

Getting alcohol from mom or dad doesn ’t prevent risky drinking
(Reuters Health) - Parents may be tempted to give teens an occasional taste of alcohol to teach responsible drinking habits, but a new study suggests this may have the opposite effect. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Is FDA Getting More Cozy with AI?
The use of artificial intelligence (AI) is undoubtedly on the rise in healthcare. From fledging medtech companies to established giants like Watson IBM—many firms are riding the current AI wave. Not only are companies embracing technology, but so is FDA. Recently the agency gave approval to San Francisco-based Viz.ai’s Contact application, a type of clinical decision support software designed to analyze CT results that could notify providers of a potential stroke in their patients. “What it’s doing is comparing the imaging features in that patient with the millions of images it has been tr...
Source: MDDI - February 14, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Medical Device Business Digital Health Source Type: news

Fewer Scientists Are Studying Insects. Here ’s Why That’s So Dangerous
In the summer of 2016, Jerome Goddard, a medical entomologist in Mississippi, received an email from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with a desperate ask. The agency was conducting an “urgent” search for insect scientists around the U.S. who could take up to a six-month paid leave from work to help the CDC fight the Zika outbreak in the U.S., and possibly respond to areas with local transmission if needed. “That’s how bad it is—they need to borrow someone,” says Goddard, an extension professor of medical entomology at Mississippi State University. “We can&...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

The Training of Dr. Robot: Data Wave Hits Medical Care The Training of Dr. Robot: Data Wave Hits Medical Care
Algorithms and other technologies are moving from research labs to hospitals and clinics to predict and combat disease.Kaiser Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What is an intercostal muscle strain?
Learn all about intercostal muscle strain, when the muscles between the ribs are damaged. We look at the signs, causes, and treatment options here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rheumatology Source Type: news

For one early adopter, CAR T therapy means 18 months cancer-free and counting
For as long as he can remember, Josh Feldman has eagerly embraced the latest technology.Decades ago, his family was the first one on the block with a VCR. Years later, when television went hi-def, he acquired a big-screen TV and signed up for HD service.So after he was diagnosed with lymphoma, it was only natural that Feldman was driven to join clinical trials for a promising new treatment. He would become one of the first UCLA Health patients to receive CAR T therapy. When nothing else worked, the treatment beat back cancer and filled his life with new hope.“Years ago, while doing my own reading after my diagnosis, ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news