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Device that measures cell strength could help identify drugs for asthma, hypertension and muscular dystrophy
Engineers, doctors and scientists at UCLA and Rutgers University have developed a tool that measures the physical strength of individual cells 100 times faster than current technologies.The new device could make it easier and faster to test and evaluate new drugs for diseases associated with abnormal levels of cell strength, including hypertension, asthma and muscular dystrophy. It could also open new avenues for biological research into cell force. It is the first high-throughput tool that can measure the strength of thousands of individual cells at a time.“Our tool tracks how much force individual cells exert over ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Data protection e-learning course
This e-learning course has been revised and is up to date for 2017-18, including information on GDPR. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - February 9, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Helping social entrepreneurs improve rural life
Challenges facing rural regions include few higher educational opportunities and lack of public transport, healthcare and shops. An EU-funded project combines research and training to help entrepreneurs improve life in such areas so as to encourage young people to stay and persuade those who have left to return. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 9, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

CHI St. Vincent Hot Springs, Osteopathic School Partner on Residency Programs
CHI St. Vincent Hot Springs announces a partnership with the Arkansas College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Smith to develop new undergraduate medical education and graduate medical education training opportunities for osteopathic students and graduates. (Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care)
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - February 8, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

OHSU ditches 'archaic' transplant policy
Oregon Health& Science University reversed course and announced Wednesday that it had ditched its “archaic" transplant policy that had prevented an undocumented woman from getting evaluated for a liver transplant. “Upon learning of the policy, OHSU leaders acted immediately and terminated the policy,” the university said in a written statement posted on its website. “We deeply regret th e pain this has caused the family.” The transplant team informed the family of the change, and OHSU’s… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 8, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

OHSU ditches 'archaic' transplant policy
Oregon Health& Science University reversed course and announced Wednesday that it had ditched its “archaic" transplant policy that had prevented an undocumented woman from getting evaluated for a liver transplant. “Upon learning of the policy, OHSU leaders acted immediately and terminated the policy,” the university said in a written statement posted on its website. “We deeply regret th e pain this has caused the family.” The transplant team informed the family of the change, and OHSU’s… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Nursing home giant Genesis eyes approval for $26M Dracut facility
Genesis HealthCare, one of the country ’s largest operators of nursing home facilities, is seeking state approval for a 73,000 square-foot facility in Dracut that will also function as a teaching center for students at nearby UMass Lowell. Pennsylvania-based Genesis (NYSE: GEN), through a subsidiary called SunBridge Healthcare, has fi led paperwork with the state department of public health in recent months outlining the proposed project at 55 Loon Hill Road in Dracut. The 120-bed skilled nursing… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 8, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Nursing home giant Genesis eyes approval for $26M Dracut facility
Genesis HealthCare, one of the country ’s largest operators of nursing home facilities, is seeking state approval for a 73,000 square-foot facility in Dracut that will also function as a teaching center for students at nearby UMass Lowell. Pennsylvania-based Genesis (NYSE: GEN), through a subsidiary called SunBridge Healthcare, has fi led paperwork with the state department of public health in recent months outlining the proposed project at 55 Loon Hill Road in Dracut. The 120-bed skilled nursing… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

Stand Up for Health: Health and Wellness Services for Your Community
As part of our ongoing partnership with the Public Library Association(PLA) and supplemental funding from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), our office has developed a new course on health information for public library staff. In developing this course, we partnered with OCLC WebJunction and the College of Education at the University of Iowa to incorporate feedback from participants and best practices for online learning. Stand Up for Health: Health and Wellness Services for Your Community is a 12 credit continuing education (CE) credit course, delivered both online and in-person...
Source: The Cornflower - February 8, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Bobbi Newman Tags: Public Libraries Source Type: news

Cochrane Sweden seeks Fellow - Lund, Sweden
Job title: Cochrane Sweden FellowSpecifications: Part Time (0.5 FTE)Reports to:director of Cochrane SwedenLocation:Lund, SwedenApplication Closing Date: 28th February 2018Purpose of the job:As member of the Cochrane Sweden team, the Fellow works closely with the director of the centre to support activities. A key function will be to provide support in training and education events.Background:Cochrane Sweden was launched in May 2017 with the support and guidance of the Nordic Cochrane Centre. It is funded by Sk åne University Hospital (mainly thanks to prof.Ingemar Petersson), Region Sk åne and Lund University. ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - February 8, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder share molecular traits, study finds
Most medical disorders have well-defined physical characteristics seen in tissues, organs and bodily fluids. Psychiatric disorders, in contrast, are not defined by such pathology, but rather by behavior.A UCLA-led study,publishedin Science, has found that autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share some physical characteristics — and important differences — at the molecular level, specifically, patterns of gene expression in the brain. Gene expression is the process by which instructions in DNA are converted into a product, such as a protein.“These findings provide a molecular, pathological signature...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In Uganda, availability of medicines for chronic diseases varies widely
Researchers from Yale, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, and Uganda have released a new study which details medical disparities that are rife across the country. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCSF receives another record $500M donation from Helen Diller Foundation
The University of California, San Francisco has received a $500 million commitment from the Helen Diller Foundation toward rebuilding its Parnassus Heights hospital. This is the foundation’s third major contribution to UCSF in the last 15 years. In total, the family foundation has donated or committed more than $1.15 billion to the university to support faculty and students, innovation programs and cancer research. The gift will allow UCSF to begin the pl anning process for a new seismically… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 8, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Antoinette Siu Source Type: news

What Medtech Can Learn from Starbucks
In the medical device industry, it's common to see innovations that gain traction in the marketplace because of an unmet need it fills that clinicians have specifically asked for because they knew it would make their job easier in some way and lead to better patient outcomes. On the other hand, there are times that the marketplace goes gangbusters for something they would have never even thought to ask for. During a panel session on product design at MD&M West, Dave Saunders, used coffee as a prime example of that.  "If you ask people to describe their perfect cup of coffee they'll tell you 'rich, bold, ...
Source: MDDI - February 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: MD & M West (Anaheim) Design Source Type: news

In Small Counties, Dispatcher-Led CPR Instruction Leaves Call Centers Short-Staffed
MADISON, Wis. (WMTV) -- A bill that would require 9-1-1 dispatchers in Wisconsin to receive training on how to walk callers through CPR administration could put a strain on short-staffed call centers. Several counties across the state like Dane, Columbia and Rock already require their dispatchers to receive CPR training. Director of Dane County 911, John Dejung, says in 2017, dispatchers saved eleven lives by giving CPR information over the phone. "We know, from our own experience, that it truly can be life saving," Dejung said. He spoke in favor of the proposal at a Senate public hearing on Tuesday. Sm...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - February 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: NBC15/WMTV Tags: News Videos Cardiac & Resuscitation Communications Dispatch Source Type: news

In Small Counties, Dispatcher-Led CPR Instruction Leaves Call Centers Short-Staffed
MADISON, Wis. (WMTV) -- A bill that would require 9-1-1 dispatchers in Wisconsin to receive training on how to walk callers through CPR administration could put a strain on short-staffed call centers. Several counties across the state like Dane, Columbia and Rock already require their dispatchers to receive CPR training. Director of Dane County 911, John Dejung, says in 2017, dispatchers saved eleven lives by giving CPR information over the phone. "We know, from our own experience, that it truly can be life saving," Dejung said. He spoke in favor of the proposal at a Senate public hearing on Tuesday. Sm...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: NBC15/WMTV Tags: News Videos Cardiac & Resuscitation Communications Dispatch Source Type: news

Evening of Fine Wine and Scrumptious Bites to Benefit Patient Care
Celebrating a vintage 27th year, the Friends of Strong Gala Wine Tasting is set to swirl at the historic Monroe Golf Club, Friday, Feb. 9, from 7 to 10 p.m., in support of patient- and family-centered care initiatives throughout UR Medicine ’s Strong Memorial Hospital. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - February 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

TDSB approves plan to stock naloxone kits in high schools
The TDSB will be training about three staff members per school on the use of naloxone and the nasal spray version of the drug, which is supplied in the kit. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Toronto Source Type: news

What you should know about knee instability and dislocations in young athletes
Pain in the kneecap (patella) is very common in young athletes. It’s estimated that up to 15% of adolescents get some degree of patellofemoral pain. Most can be treated with rest, ice, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and sometimes rehab exercises. But instability of the patella — known as patellofemoral instability — is relatively less common, and more worrisome for children and adolescents. The term “patellofemoral instability” can refer to either a traumatic injury in which a person dislocates their patella, or just general instability in the knee that a person may feel or a p...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 8, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Ask the Expert Dr. Matthew Milewski Orthopedic Center patellofemoral pain syndrome Sports Medicine Division Source Type: news

Teaching Medical Spanish to Improve Population Health Webinar
February 22, 2018 1:30-3:00pm ET. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New silicon chip for helping build quantum computers and securing our information
Researchers at the University of Bristol ’ s Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: ; Faculty of Engineering Source Type: news

Studying the effects of early childhood circumstances on long-term health
YSPH ’s Xi Chen wants to understand how factors like religious fasting during pregnancy can affect public health and human capital over time. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Book Review: A Parent ’ s Guide to Teen Addiction
It’s true in this country that we do have a war on drugs. But for many parents, that war is waging in their own home with their own teenagers. According to Laurence Westreich, MD, who is an addiction expert, father, and author of A Parent’s Guide to Teen Addiction: Professional Advice on Signs, Symptoms, What to Say, and How to Help, defeating an enemy that is larger and more powerful than us will require unconventional tactics. The first step is to know who the enemy is. “Always remember that substance abuse – NOT your teenager – is the enemy,” writes Westreich. What teen...
Source: Psych Central - February 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Addictions Book Reviews Caregivers Children and Teens Family Parenting Self-Help Substance Abuse child addiction get help for addiction parenting guide Teen Addiction teenager addiction Source Type: news

Honorary degrees awarded at the University of Bristol – Thursday 8 February 2018
The University of Bristol is awarding honorary degrees to Andrew Langdon QC, Sherry Coutu CBE and Mark Watkins at degree ceremonies taking place today [8 February] in the Wills Memorial Building. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Announcements; Press Release Source Type: news

Drugs, Alcohol and Suicide Are Causing Life Expectancy in America to Drop Dramatically
U.S. life expectancy has decreased for the second year in a row, and an editorial in the BMJ points to three contributing factors: drugs, alcohol and suicides, particularly among middle-age white Americans and those living in rural communities. The authors of the paper paint a bleak picture of the problems facing much of the United States today, but the authors say that policies that bolster the middle-class can help reverse the trend. The recent drop in life expectancy is alarming, the editorial states, “because life expectancy has risen for much of the past century in developed countries, including in the U.S.&rdqu...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Full-Time Graduate Enrollment in Science and Engineering Continues to Grow in 2016 Due to Increased Enrollment by Foreign Students on Temporary Visas
The number of full-time graduate students enrolled in science and engineering (S&E) programs rose 0.8% in 2016 after rising by 2.8% in 2015. The 2016 increase was due to a 2.1% increase in the full-time enrollment of foreign students with temporary visas. In 2016, full-time S&E foreign graduate student enrollment grew to 210,260 and represented 45% of all full-time S&E graduate students. In contrast, full-time S&E graduate enrollment of U.S. citizens and permanent residents declined for the fifth year in a row. Data are from the 2016 Survey of Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering....
Source: NSF - Statistics on U.S. Science and Engineering Resources - February 8, 2018 Category: Statistics Source Type: news

Undocumented Woman Cleared For Liver Transplant After Oregon Hospital Rolls Back ‘Archaic’ Policy
An Oregon hospital has eliminated an “archaic” policy that would have barred an undocumented Portland resident from getting a lifesaving liver transplant. Silvia Lesama-Santos, a mother of four who is covered by her husband’s insurance and has lived in Portland for 30 years, was originally denied care at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) hospital because of her immigration status, the Oregonian reports. The Oregon chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) took up Lesama-Santos’ case, putting out a statement on Tuesday calling for the hospital to roll back any policy that limit...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime oregon Source Type: news

Concerns over cancer-causing chemical in coffee overblown?
A cup of coffee in California could soon come with a cancer warning. The Council for Education and Research on Toxins wants businesses to warn consumers about a possible cancer risk from coffee. The push for a warning stems from a natural chemical produced when coffee beans are roasted. John Blackstone reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What foods should you eat on a ketogenic diet?
Learn about the foods to eat and avoid when following a ketogenic diet. We also look at some tips for following the diet, and possible side effects. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Targeted training leads to significant increase in the delivery of alcohol interventions in primary care, new study shows
New research published today (8 February) shows a marked increase in the delivery of alcohol brief interventions in primary care settings where nurse mentors are specifically trained, bringing significant benefits to those at risk of alcohol harm. The research, funded by Alcohol Research UK and conducted by Substance Misuse Management Good Practice (SMMGP), highlights the key role that nurse mentors can play in leading the implementation of alcohol brief interventions. By offering brief advice to those at risk, clinicians are able to advise patients on effective strategies to reduce their drinking. Key findings from the st...
Source: Alcohol Research UK - February 8, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Julie Symes Tags: News brief interventions identification and brief advice Source Type: news

Health Information for Public Librarians Symposium – Funding Available!
The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is offering stipends of up to $500 to support travel and lodging to attend the Health Information for Public Librarians Symposium taking place at this year’s Medical Library Association Annual Meeting in Atlanta, GA. The Symposium will take place on May 22nd and 23rd. Stipends are offered on a first-come, first-serve basis with an emphasis on equal distribution across the nation. You must be working in a US-based public library and have an interest or role in providing health information to the public in order to qualify. For accepted applications, registration to ...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - February 8, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Consumer Health Funding Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Eczema elimination diet and foods to eat
Eczema is linked to inflammation in the body, so eating an anti-inflammatory diet may help reduce symptoms. Learn about which foods to eliminate. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Eczema / Psoriasis Source Type: news

Tanzania:Mloganzila Faces Acute Staff Shortage
[Citizen] Dar es Salaam -Tanzanian doctors who have attended one-year medical training in Korea have been challenged to join the newly opened Muhimbili Academic Medical Centre (MAMC) at Mloganzila as the centre faces an acute staff shortage. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 8, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

ESRD QIP: Final Rule for CY 2018 Call
February 22, 2018 1:00-2:00pm ET. During this call, learn about provisions in the CY 2018 End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Prospective Payment System final rule, including plans for the ESRD Quality Incentive Program (QIP) in Payment Year (PY) 2019, 2020, and 2021. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Supporting nurse mentors to reduce the barriers to implementing alcohol Interventions and Brief Advice (IBA) in primary care
Conclusion This project indicates that by supporting nurse mentors in leading on the implementation of IBA there is potential for reducing alcohol-related harm within the existing resources of the surgery. This could support primary care in the practical implementation of an evidence based cost effective intervention which has experienced patchy uptake. References 1 Her Majesty’s Government (2012) The Government’s Alcohol Strategy -2012 2 House of Commons Health Committee, 29012, Government’s Alcohol Strategy 3 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2012) Alcohol-use disorders: prevention Guid...
Source: Alcohol Research UK - February 8, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: admin Tags: Alcohol Insights Source Type: news

Study, using brain imaging technology in use at Upstate, shows doctors have more time for clot removal procedure, than first thought
Previously, the window for performing a thrombectomy was about 6 hours, but study results show positive effect for late presenting patients, with the procedure performed up to 16 hours after stroke onset. (Source: SUNY Upstate Medical)
Source: SUNY Upstate Medical - February 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCSF receives another record $500M donation from Helen Diller Foundation to build new hospital
UCSF has received a $500 million commitment from the Helen Diller Foundation toward rebuilding its Parnassus Heights hospital in the Inner Sunset District. This is the foundation’s third major contribution to the University of California, San Francisco in the last 15 years. In total, the family foundation has donated or committed more than $1.15 billion to the university to support faculty and students, innovation programs and cancer research. The gift will allow UCSF to begin the planning… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Antoinette Siu Source Type: news

Center for autoimmune and inflammation disorders named for emeritus professor Paul Phillips, MD
The Phillips Center focuses on the metabolic control of autoimmunity, inflammation, immune health and supports new collaborative initiatives in autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. (Source: SUNY Upstate Medical)
Source: SUNY Upstate Medical - February 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Upstate now offers Watchman implant to reduce stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation
The Watchman implant is designed to keep harmful blood clots from entering the blood stream and potentially causing a stroke (Source: SUNY Upstate Medical)
Source: SUNY Upstate Medical - February 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Pharmacognosy, a Contemporary Approach Pharmacognosy, a Contemporary Approach
This report details one program's approach.American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pharmacist Journal Article Source Type: news

HFpEF With Pulmonary Vascular Disease: A New Phenotype? HFpEF With Pulmonary Vascular Disease: A New Phenotype?
What do we know about the emerging clinical syndrome of pulmonary hypertension in HFpEF, and what do we still need to learn? This brief summarizes current knowledge of this newly recognized problem.European Heart Journal (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

AI computer vision breakthrough IDs poachers in less than half a second
(University of Southern California) Researchers at the USC Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society have long been applying AI to protect wildlife. Initially, computer scientists were using AI and game theory to anticipate the poachers' haunts, and now they have applied artificial intelligence and deep learning to spot poachers in near real-time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study explains how your brain helps you learn new skills
(Gladstone Institutes) Researchers from the Gladstone Institutes uncovered how a special type of neuron improves the efficiency of procedural learning. They initially wanted to show how the specialized brain cells, called fast-spiking interneurons, cause movement disorders, such as Tourette's syndrome, dystonia, and dyskinesia. As it turns out, that isn't the case. But their work led them to an even greater discovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ball games and circuit strength training boost bone health in schoolchildren
(University of Southern Denmark Faculty of Health Sciences) The type of exercise that children get in school does make a difference. This is shown by a major Danish study from researchers at the University of Southern Denmark and University of Copenhagen. Eight to ten-year-old schoolchildren develop stronger bones, increased muscular strength and improved balance when ball games or circuit training are on the timetable. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Undergraduate student uncovers genes associated with aggressive form of brain cancer
(Clemson University) Using publicly available data and novel computer software called KINC, an undergraduate researcher in genetics and biochemistry at Clemson University was able to uncover a group of 22 genes that are implicated together as having involvement in glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of brain cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Nature, meet nurture
(Harvard Medical School) Is it nature or nurture that ultimately shapes an organism? A new study reveals a dramatic landscape of gene expression changes across all cell types in the mouse visual cortex after a sensory experience, many linked to neural connectivity and the brain's ability to rewire itself to learn and adapt. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The beneficial aspects of mindfulness for students of computer engineering
(University of Seville) Subjected to the same practice exercise, the group of students that participated in mindfulness sessions obtained better results than those that did not take part in this activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sex ed 'must cover respect and consent', say young mums
Former teenage mothers says revised sex education must cover issues such as saying 'no' and date-rape drugs. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Post-Partum Depression: A Clinical, Not Legal, Issue
(MedPage Today) -- California case has experts calling for better provider education (Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN)
Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN - February 8, 2018 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

Yorkshire nurses pioneering access to severe asthma drugs
Nurses, doctors and therapists at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust are working together to identify and treat people with severe asthma who could benefit from new drugs. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - February 8, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news