Is an opioid really the best medication for my pain?
As physicians, many of our daily practices involve administration of substances that are shrouded in mystery. Certain medications, specifically opioids, have been part of tragic news stories, and have turned young children into orphans, happy spouses into widows and widowers, and once-aspirational youth into memories. The CDC reports that on average, 130 people die each day from an opioid overdose. With such harrowing statistics, why take opioids in the first place? Well, if used appropriately, opioids can significantly improve pain with relatively tolerable side effects. A short-term course of opioids (typically 3 to 7 da...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Salim Zerriny, MD Tags: Addiction Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Is sugar causing you to AGE faster?
  Americans consume the equivalent of 300 loaves of bread each year (representing enormous exposure to the amylopectin A carbohydrate that behaves like sugar or worse). They also consume 200 pounds of sugar. It is not uncommon for sugar alone to comprise a quarter of all calories taken in over the course of the day—some of it out in the open, some of it hidden. To understand the adverse effects of sugars—sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup, and other fructose-rich sweeteners, such as agave, honey, and maple syrup—we need to understand two phenomena: 1. Insulin resistance 2 Glycation. Insulin Resistanc...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 18, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Anti-aging BLOOD SUGAR Diabetes Dr. Davis Undoctored arthritis dementia grain-free grains health heart disease insulin joint pain weight gain Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

The inflammatory myopathies rap video you didn ’t know you needed
Learn about the differences between polymyositis and dermatomyositis the Medcomic way. Illustrated by  Jorge Muniz and music by Neil Bobenhouse. Image credit: Medcomic.comFind jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 17, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jorge-muniz-and-neil-bobenhouse" rel="tag" > Jorge Muniz, PA-C and Neil Bobenhouse, DO < /a > < /span > Tags: Video Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

Uncooperative Elder Who Doesn ’t Want To Work With Therapist Frustrates Caregiver
Photo credit Angels Vicente Dear Carol: My mother, 93, is mentally sharp and lives in her own retirement apartment. As would be expected, she has some physical problems including arthritis severe enough that she needed a hip replacement in her 70s. She uses a walker but her balance is iffy even with that. I’d like her to have physical therapy to help her improve her balance because of the risk of falling. I’ve communicated with a doctor and she said that we could have a therapist come to the apartment twice a week but Mom refuses. She takes little medication so there’s nothing detrimental that I can ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - June 15, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Is tramadol a risky pain medication?
All medications come with a dose of risk. From minor side effects to life-threatening allergic reactions, every decision to take a medication should be made only after the expected benefits are weighed against the known risks. You aren’t on your own in this: your doctor, your pharmacist, and a trove of information are available for your review. Recently, I wrote about how newly approved drugs often accumulate new warnings about their safety, including a gout medication that garnered a new warning due to an increased risk of death. Now, according to a new study, the common prescription pain medication tramadol ma...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Addiction Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Benefits of Therapy You Probably Didn ’t Know About
Many of us have a narrow view of therapy. We think it’s solely for navigating clinical depression or severe anxiety or roller-coaster moods. We think it’s only an option when we’re going through a major crisis, a big transition, or a prolonged, persistent period of grief. We think therapy is only an option when relationships become disconnected, and marriages are on the brink of divorce. While therapy is important and vital for all the above, it’s also helpful for a lot of other reasons, and you don’t have to wait until the walls are falling down to work with a clinician. You can go when the p...
Source: World of Psychology - June 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Happiness Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Psychotherapy Stigma Success & Achievement Source Type: blogs

What Was the Cause of the Excruciating Pain in His Shoulders and Hips? - The New York Times
As the physician prepared to leave the exam room, the patient's wife spoke up:"Doctor, my husband won't tell you this, but he is suffering," the woman said, her voice cracking. Dr. Timothy Quan, a rheumatologist in central Connecticut, looked at the 69-year-old man he'd been caring for over the past several months. The man gave a brisk nod. It was true. The past few weeks had been a nightmare of pain.Six months earlier, the patient woke up with a sore, swollen right hand. He figured he must have injured it a few days before when he cleared out a pile of wood in his backyard. He mentioned it to his pri...
Source: Psychology of Pain - June 5, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Hydrogel Harvests Nitric Oxide to Stop Damage from Rheumatoid Arthritis
Excess nitric oxide (NO) in the body is involved in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. Reducing the amount of NO may lead to a new therapeutic approach for a variety of conditions. Researchers at the Pohang University of Science & Technology in South Korea have developed an NO-scavenging nanogel and tested it in mice with rheumatoid arthritis with promising results. The gel is made through polymerization between acrylamide and NO-cleavable crosslinkers. It is not designed to regulate the production of NO, but rather to consume it and thereby reduce its effects without the side-effects of current trea...
Source: Medgadget - June 5, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Medicine Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Cbd pain stick – now workout without the fear of pain
You're reading CBD PAIN STICK – NOW WORKOUT WITHOUT THE FEAR OF PAIN, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. With lifestyle, health, fitness, skincare-based magazines all flooding with articles on CBD, it is quite apparent that this compound coming from cannabis is taking over the health and fitness industry. What’s more, is that there’s a base to its popularity. Besides magazines, you’d also find renowned researchers ardently researching the compound to identify many health benefits that...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah123 Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

“ What if I just ignore my SIBO? ”
By just engaging in the basic strategies in the Wheat Belly Total Health, Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox, or Undoctored programs, many mild cases of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO, reverse. These efforts thereby restore your ability to ingest prebiotic fibers without diarrhea, bloating, gas, abdominal discomfort, joint pain, and dark emotional feelings. Many people thereby are relieved of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, fibromyalgia, or restless leg syndrome, or have greater power in reversing autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Unfortunately, not everybody enjoys reversal of SIBO with our b...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 27, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: SIBO grain-free probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 27th 2019
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 26, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Author Inspired To Help Other Caregivers In Need By Establishing Foundation
When people think about caregiving spouses, they often think of older adults. We only have to look at a young mother diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), a young husband diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or in this case, a woman who’s healthy husband had a sudden, massive stroke, to know differently. Care partners come in all ages. Kathi Koll, author of “Kick-Ass Kinda Girl: A Memoir of Life, Love, and Caregiving” knows the drill. Read the full article on HealthCentral about Kathi Koll and her foundation that helps caregivers: Carol Bradley Bursack is the Candid Caregiver Me...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 23, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Celebrities are bringing a myriad of health conditions into the public consciousness
It seems now as if every day and every month is associated with a“national day” or an“awareness month.”   Some such as“national taco day” may be less important than others, well depending on one’s priorities.   Although many illnesses now also have a dedicated day or month, many of these diseases will go unnoticed.  […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/joshua-mansour" rel="tag" > Joshua Mansour, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Oncology/Hematology Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

VCAM1 Levels Correlate with Parkinson's Disease Severity
Levels of VCAM1 in the bloodstream increase with age, and it appears to be an important signal molecule in at least the brain. Its expression is upregulated by inflammatory cytokines, and so is a marker of inflammatory disease. Chronic inflammation of course increases with age. Researchers have shown that blocking VCAM1 can prevent suppression of neurogenesis due to delivery of old blood plasma into young mice, which is an interesting result, as one might not expect detrimental reactions to inflammatory signaling to have such a narrow bottleneck of regulation. Would a method of interfering with VCAM1 assist in tissue maint...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 20, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 20th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 19, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

‘ At Least You Don ’ t Have … ’ How to Be Supportive of Someone with Chronic Illness
I was speaking with someone recently who has a series of chronic and painful conditions; some of which are noticeable and some ‘invisible’. What is particularly distressful is that people sometimes say to her, “At least you don’t have cancer.” How dismissive is that? I know they are trying to help her feel better about what she does have and perhaps even attempt to minimize the impact, but it is not compassionate or helpful. There are diagnoses such as fibromyalgia, lupus, diabetes, arthritis or neuropathy which some people have to navigate. It might mean taking naps on an as-needed basis, en...
Source: World of Psychology - May 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Chronic Pain Health-related Inspiration & Hope Personal Arthritis Chronic Illness Diabetes Fibromyalgia Lupus Lyme disease neuropathy peer support Source Type: blogs

Awareness and Social Media Fundamentals for Patient Communities – #HITsm Chat Topic
We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 5/17 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Amanda (@LALupusLady) on the topic of “Awareness and Social Media Fundamentals for Patient Communities”. May is Lupus Awareness Month, Fibromyalgia Awareness Month, Mental Health Awareness Month, Arthritis Awareness […] (Source: EMR and HIPAA)
Source: EMR and HIPAA - May 14, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: #HITsm Communication and Patient Experience Healthcare IT #HITsm Topics Amanda Green Healthcare Social Media LALupusLady Patient Communities Patients Source Type: blogs

Big problems for big toe joints
Big toe joint problems aren’t fun, as many people know from personal experience. Red, swollen, or misshapen joints can be unsightly. Still worse, though, is the pain –– and sometimes the risk of immobility –– that accompanies big toe joint problems. Fortunately, you can take some simple steps to help relieve pain and keep you from slowing down. Big toe 101 The big toe has two joints, but the one most vulnerable to problems is the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint. It connects the first long bone (metatarsal) in the forefoot to the first bone of the big toe (phalanx). The MTP joint bends with eve...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heidi Godman Tags: Bones and joints Exercise and Fitness Foot Care Health Source Type: blogs

Unity Biotechnology's Locally Administered Senolytic Trials
Unity Biotechnology has raised an enormous amount of funding from investors and the public markets in order to advance a pipeline of small molecule senolytic drugs. They are presently somewhat ahead of the numerous other senolytic startup biotechnology companies in terms of the road to the clinic. Senolytic compounds are those that can selectively destroy senescent cells in old tissues, thereby removing the contribution of these cells to the aging process. This is literally rejuvenation, albeit quite narrowly focused on just one of the many causes of aging. It is disappointing that Unity Biotechnology principals are...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 13, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Clinical reasoning & meaning-making (a long post)
Clinical reasoning is a cornerstone of evidence-based healthcare, in fact some would argue it’s the cornerstone of all healthcare. While there are many different processes, the ultimate purpose of clinical reasoning is to ensure the person seeking help has their needs identified then met, and the clinician has a basis upon which to decide which treatment they should offer. The approach we use in clinical reasoning, including the information we prioritise and search for, and the way we synthesise the information to make sense of it will depend on the model we have to explain our treatment approach. For example, if...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - May 13, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Occupational therapy Pain conditions Physiotherapy Professional topics Psychology Research Science in practice embodiment intersubjectivity making sense persistent pain Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 53-year-old man with recurrent gout attacks
Test your medicine knowledge with the  MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 53-year-old man is evaluated for a 5-year history of recurrent gout attacks involving the base of the great toes, mid feet, and ankles. Episodes are becoming more frequent and severe. History is also significant for hypert ension and stage 3 chronic […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 11, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Medications Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

US Veteran Finds Pain Relief with Umbilical Cord Tissue Stem Cells
Bob Knapp is an 86-year-old veteran who has always accepted most of life’s challenges that commonly occur with old age. Recently, however, he developed degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis and arthritis. The pain affected his back and knees. It became so severe, that he struggled with standing, walking and even getting out of bed. On a mission to find long-lasting pain-relief, Bob found himself at Heller Healthcare, a chiropractic wellness center in Brunswick, Georgia. Dr. Heller offers individualized treatment programs for patients who experience bone, joint and muscle pain. But her technique has always been m...
Source: Cord Blood News - May 8, 2019 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Maze Cord Blood Tags: Cord Blood stem cells Source Type: blogs

An experimental study of pharmaceutical cannabis in fibromyalgia
This study is one of the growing number of studies beginning to examine the effects of cannabinoids on pain, and offers a tiny window into what might be happening. Note: the study was performed in collaboration with the cannabis producer, and one of the authors is an employee of this company. Although his role was only to comment on the protocol and final version of the paper, it’s worth noting this relationship. The study question In this study, the researchers were looking to understand the analgesic effect of inhaled pharmaceutical-grade cannabis as a plant rather than an extract, using four different variet...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - May 6, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Coping strategies News Pain conditions Research cannabis experiment fibromyalgia Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 6th 2019
This study shows that mRNA levels of the aging related lamin A splice variant progerin, associated with premature aging in HGPS, were significantly upregulated in subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Moreover, our data revealed a significantly positive correlation of BMI with progerin mRNA. These data provide to our knowledge for the first-time evidence for a possible involvement of progerin in previously observed accelerated aging of overweight and obese individuals potentially limiting their longevity. Our results also showed that progerin mRNA was positively correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP). This might suggest an as...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 5, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A patient ’s frustrating prior authorization journey
My experience trying to obtain the drug prescribed by my rheumatologist is a cautionary tale. This is not about whether the doctor ordered it, or how the specialty pharmacy (CVS) must wait for approval from the insurer before filling the prescription, but the fact the patient who resides and waits at the end of the […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 3, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/leslie-g-bank" rel="tag" > Leslie G. Bank, PT < /a > < /span > Tags: Patient Medications Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

The trouble with new drugs
When a drug is approved by the FDA, it may seem like it’s only a matter of time before some unexpected side effects are discovered. Perhaps it seems that way because it’s true! According to a study of all drugs approved between 2001 and 2010, the FDA announced alerts, warnings, or recalls on about one-third of them in the years after their approval. Some of the side effects were minor and easily managed. For example, there might be a warning to avoid taking a new medication at the same time as another medication. But sometimes the “side effect” is death. And that’s the case with a new warning ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Source Type: blogs

Chronic Inflammation as Proximate Cause of a Large Fraction of Age-Related Disease
This popular science article discusses at length the chronic inflammation that is characteristic of the old, and its role as a proximate cause of age-related disease. Inflammation is a necessary part of the immune response to injury and pathogens, and when present in the short term it is vital to the proper operation of bodily systems. But when the immune system runs awry in later life, and inflammatory processes are constantly running, then this inflammation corrodes metabolism, tissue function, and health. The causes of excess, constant inflammation are both internal and external to the immune system. Internally, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 30, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

4 Healthy Practices with High ‘Reward-To-Effort’ Ratio
You're reading 4 Healthy Practices with High ‘Reward-To-Effort’ Ratio, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. We might have been able to dig the surface of Mars, build artificially intelligent robots and make virtual reality a new normal but everything comes with a price and in exchange of this technologically advanced era, we have traded our health. The modern-day lifestyle looks amazing from outside as we are now equipped with many scientific and technological marvels which a decade ago, were not ev...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - April 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Saurabh64cloud Tags: featured health and fitness diet good habits Source Type: blogs

Pacing, pacing, pacing …
If there’s one pain management and rehabilitation strategy that keeps me awake at night, it’s pacing. Living with persistent pain, I loathe the idea of pacing because I know everyone “booms and busts” from time to time, and few people like the idea of planning every single aspect of every single day as they come to grips with modifying their daily routines. BUT it’s one of the most popular strategies in textbooks, self-help books, and in treatment so there must be something in it, right? Vexed definitions One of the problems with the whole pacing concept is defining what we mean by it. I...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - April 29, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: 'Pacing' or Quota Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Coping strategies Occupational therapy Pain conditions Physiotherapy Research Science in practice activity management activity pacing pain management pain rehabilita Source Type: blogs

When People Can't Articulate Pain Body Language is a Crucial Clue
Photo credit Jeremy Wong A number of years back, my dad, who had developed dementia after a surgery to correct problems from a World War II brain injury, was seized by sudden, horrendous pain. While Dad had to cope with considerable pain from arthritis and some back issues, this was different. I knew his pain was acute and extreme by his body language and vocalizations, even though he couldn't articulate exactly what was wrong. Dad generally had the ability to communicate, though his dementia often skewed the information he was trying to share... Read the full article on HealthCentral about how body language can be key to ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 25, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 22nd 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 21, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Measles, tuberculosis, and wheat
Humans have made many dietary mistakes over the years but two mistakes, in particular, stand out: close contact with animals, mostly ruminants, who conveyed their diseases to us and the adoption of the seeds of grasses as human food. These two practices not only changed the course of human history but also human disease. Over the last several centuries, Westerners have populated North America, South America, Pacific islands and other regions. Equipped with superior tools of warfare such as swords and muskets, contact with Westerners decimated indigenous people such as the millions of native Americans, Aztecs, and Amazonian...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 17, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten-free grain-free grains joint pain Source Type: blogs

Visualizing the Cost of Age-Related Disease as Disability Adjusted Life Years
Disability adjusted life years (DALYs) are a statistical construct used in epidemiology to assess the harms caused by disease, particularly the chronic diseases of aging, as these are by far the greatest burden of disease that is inflicted upon the population as a whole. The costs of aging are huge, however they are measured. It is the greatest single cause of human suffering and death, and the economic effects of this constant destruction of human lives and capabilities are sized to match. The greatest good any of us can do in the world as it stands today is to work towards bringing aging under medical control. D...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 17, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Does running cause arthritis?
In general, physical activity is important in maintaining your health. Many people falsely believe that running can cause arthritis but research show that this isn’t necessarily true. In reality, walking, running or strenuous exercise can significantly decrease risk of any knee osteoarthritis. Doctors are still trying to understand how running can improve knee arthritis, with […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 16, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/nancy-yen-shipley" rel="tag" > Nancy Yen Shipley, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Orthopedics Source Type: blogs

Ten reasons to never eat wheat
How can conventional dietary advice gotten it so wrong? Rather than eating plenty of “healthy whole grains,” people on the Wheat Belly lifestyle eat absolutely no grains and enjoy spectacular weight loss and reversal of hundreds of health conditions as a result. Unfortunately, many people view this as a “gluten-free” lifestyle which is incorrect. Here are 10 reasons why no bagels, pretzels, or sandwiches made from wheat flour should ever cross human lips. Gliadin-derived opioid peptides (from partial digestion to 4- and 5-amino acid long fragments) increase appetite substantially–as do related...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 15, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle Gliadin gluten Inflammation Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 15th 2019
In this study, we found that senescent chondrocytes isolated from OA patients secrete more EVs compared with nonsenescent chondrocytes. These EVs inhibit cartilage ECM deposition by healthy chondrocytes and can induce a senescent state in nearby cells. We profiled the miR and protein content of EVs isolated from the synovial fluid of OA joints from mice with SnCs. After treatment with a molecule to remove SnCs, termed a senolytic, the composition of EV-associated miR and protein was markedly altered. The senolytic reduced OA development and enhanced chondrogenesis, and these were attributable to several specific differenti...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 14, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 62-year-old woman with a sun allergy
Test your medicine knowledge with the  MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 62-year-old woman is evaluated for a “sun allergy,” manifesting as a rash on her scalp, eyelids, upper back, and knuckles. This started 2 years ago, but is less pronounced over the winter months. Medical history is unr emarkable. Her only medication […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 13, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

Is obesity a reason to avoid joint replacement surgery?
“Come back when you’ve lost 40 pounds.” That’s something obese patients have heard often when being evaluated for a hip or knee replacement for severe arthritis. And sometimes the recommendation is to lose even more — 50, 75, or even 100 pounds… as if that’s an easy or realistic prospect. As you might expect, patients hearing this often feel disappointed and disheartened. After all, most have already tried hard to lose weight with limited success. Their arthritis pain impairs their ability to exercise, and decreasing activity has contributed to their weight gain. So being told to ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Bones and joints Health Surgery Source Type: blogs

Gum Disease Bacteria More Common in the Brains of Alzheimer's Patients
Researchers here note that the bacteria associated with gum disease are found more frequently in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. While looking over this research, it is worth bearing in mind that a recent large study found only a 6% increased risk of dementia in patients with periodontitis. So rather than thinking that there is a very large contribution to the disease process here, we might consider an alternative model: that people with Alzheimer's disease may be more likely to have a leaky blood-brain barrier, allowing greater traffic of normally forbidden molecules, cells, and pathogens into the brain. Vascu...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 11, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

De Quervain Tenosynovitis: MRI
Discussion –Clinically – h/o of repetitive overuse and sustained thumb abduction and extension in combination with radial and ulnar wrist movements in the dominant hand as usually seen in workplace activities / carrying babies/ sports related with associated soft tissue swelling in the radial side of wrist.Classic de Quervain ’s tenosynovitis includes chronic inflammation scar formation with stenosis of the approximately 1-cm-long fibroosseous tunnel of the first dorsal compartment (the groove along the radial styloid process covered by the overlying extensor retinaculum through which the abductor po...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - April 11, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

The Effects of Extracellular Vesicles from Senescent Cells in Osteoarthritis
In this study, we found that senescent chondrocytes isolated from OA patients secrete more EVs compared with nonsenescent chondrocytes. These EVs inhibit cartilage ECM deposition by healthy chondrocytes and can induce a senescent state in nearby cells. We profiled the miR and protein content of EVs isolated from the synovial fluid of OA joints from mice with SnCs. After treatment with a molecule to remove SnCs, termed a senolytic, the composition of EV-associated miR and protein was markedly altered. The senolytic reduced OA development and enhanced chondrogenesis, and these were attributable to several specific differenti...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Retrain the Brain to Deal with Chronic Pain
An interesting March 2019 article discusses a new way to help teenagers to deal with certain types of chronic pain. Pain specialists estimate there are thousands of young people suffering from inexplicable pain that intensifies, traveling randomly from one part of their body to the next. It primarily affects girls, though some boys also experience this type of pain. Some doctors call it “amplified pain” and this term acts as a catch-all for a variety of diagnoses which are not yet well understood, particularly in children. For most of these children, the pain can’t be explained entirely by a current inju...
Source: World of Psychology - April 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Brain and Behavior Health-related Chronic Pain Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

A patient imagines a conversation with Alexa
When Hubby isn ’t around to act as a sounding board, when I’m not feeling well, I talk to my dog.  She sometimes gets a fearful, tearful earful.  I think if I could channel her thoughts to Alexa, Amazon’s virtual assistant, our conversation might go something like this: Me: Alexa, it took seven days of s eeing dentists for […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 5, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/r-lynn-barnett" rel="tag" > R. Lynn Barnett < /a > < /span > Tags: Patient Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair
Mitral regurgitation is the commonest valvular lesion, due to aging of the population at large and degenerative valvular heart disease overtaking rheumatic heart disease. Standard treatment for symptomatic severe mitral regurgitation and asymptomatic severe mitral regurgitation with left ventricular dysfunction is surgical treatment. Among surgical treatments available, mitral valve repair has lesser morbidity than replacement if the valve is amenable for repair. Surgical treatment has to be deferred very often in this elderly population with multiple comorbidities [1]. Hence the role of percutaneous mitral valve repair ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - April 2, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Structural Heart Disease Interventions Source Type: blogs

The Enigmatic Ganglion Cyst
​Ganglion cysts are soft tissue, fluid-filled swellings most frequently found in the hand and wrist; their origin is not exactly clear. They are common, however, and can occasionally be associated with surprising morbidity despite their benign nature. The morbidity seems to be related to their tendency to localize in highly mobile and anatomically tight quarters such as the hand and wrist. Nevertheless, they can show up almost anywhere.Cysts can also have sequelae, such as sciatica from a piriformis ganglionic cyst, compression radiculopathy from a lumbar intraspinal ganglion cyst, foot drop from peroneal nerve cyst, met...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - April 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Do not take medical tests as gospel
During my time in practice, I had at least eight patients who came to me sure they had systemic lupus erythematosus, also commonly called SLE or lupus. This is an autoimmune disease, characterized by joint pain, that can affect almost any organ, including skin, kidneys, brain, and heart, and can even be fatal. In every […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 31, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/edward-hoffer" rel="tag" > Edward Hoffer, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 1st 2019
In conclusion, long-term aerobic exercise appears to attenuate the decline in endothelial vascular function, a benefit which is maintained during chronological aging. However, currently there is not enough evidence to suggest that exercise interventions improve vascular function in previously sedentary healthy older adults. Hijacking the Proteasome to Dispose of Unwanted Molecules in Age-Related Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/03/hijacking-the-proteasome-to-dispose-of-unwanted-molecules-in-age-related-disease/ Cells are equipped with a protein disposal system in the form of the proteaso...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 31, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Why the wheelchair? Could it be gout?
When Paul Manafort appeared in court for sentencing recently, he was in a wheelchair and pleaded for leniency, in part because “his confinement had taken a toll on his physical and mental health.” He reportedly had symptoms of depression and anxiety — but what was the health problem that put him in a wheelchair? According to multiple news reports, the answer is gout. Yes, that ancient disease you may have thought didn’t exist anymore has stricken Mr. Manafort. He joins the rising number of people in the country diagnosed with this common disease. What is gout? Gout is a cause of severe joint pa...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Bones and joints Health Inflammation Source Type: blogs

New Jersey Assembly, Senate Pass Aid in Dying Bill After Nearly 7 Years of Debate
New Jerseyans with terminal or life-shortening diseases and Compassion & Choices praised the state Assembly and Senate for passing the Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act (S1072/A1504) after nearly seven years of debate on the issue and urged Governor Phil Murphy to promptly sign it into law. The Assembly approved the bill by a 41 to 33 vote and Senate by a 21 to 16 vote. This bill would allow mentally capable, terminally ill adults with 6 months or less to live to have the option to get a doctor’s prescription for medication they can decide to take if their suffering becomes unbearable and die peacefully in ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs