Test results
Just got home from picking up my most recent blood (and urine) test results. Okay, let’s see, there’s a lot of positive stuff to report. Compared to my last tests, my M-spike and monoclonal component have gone down, my total IgG is also maintaining its downward trend, ESR is down, hey cholesterol is down, too…total protein, down…calcium and creatinine, no change (both still within normal range). There are a couple of things that aren’t so good: 1. my hemoglobin is just under the normal range…again…I see a few steaks in my future, sigh; 2. my B2M is up (again) to 3, that is, sli...
Source: Margaret's Corner - August 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll smoldering myeloma Source Type: blogs

Quick tendinitis update
I’m officially beyond the acute phase of my posterior tibial tendinitis. That means: no more pain, no more limping, and…I’m walking normally. Yaaay! My recovery was really quick, or at least I think it was quick. I’ve definitely become a huge fan of physical therapy…It has really worked for me. That doesn’t mean that I’m cured forever and can just sit back and relax. I will have to return to the sports clinic in September for some final shoulder mobility sessions (although my left shoulder is almost as “good” as my right one now). Then, I’m done… Fo...
Source: Margaret's Corner - August 1, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll posterior tibial tendinitis Source Type: blogs

Posterior tibial tendinitis
Okay, so I have gone from a fractured shoulder to posterior tibial tendinitis. No kidding. From one type of pain to another (worse, IMO, since this one affects my ability to walk properly). Uffa!!! It started about a week ago, more or less. I began experiencing a bit of pain in my left heel area, but, since I have a high pain threshold, I essentially ignored it (first lesson learned: never ignore pain of any sort!)…All I did was apply ice packs to the area a couple of times a day, and that was it. On Saturday, though, as a result of having walked a bit too fast for a bit too long, I suddenly felt a sharp pain in my...
Source: Margaret's Corner - July 24, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll posterior tibial tendinitis tendonitis Source Type: blogs

A belated birthday present …
Stefano accompanied me to my fractured shoulder checkup at the hospital on Friday. I had two X-rays of my left shoulder, and then we went to see the orthopedist. Well, the news is much (MUCH!) better than expected: the fracture is actually no longer visible on the X-rays, yep, no kidding!, and my humerus is back in its place. I am going to need more physiotherapy, since my range of motion is still not perfect, even though I can now put both arms above my head, and you can’t tell the difference between the two. But I still can’t make certain movements, such as reaching behind my back enough to hook my bra. So, ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - July 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll fractured humerus Source Type: blogs

Timed release of curcumin inhibits bone cancer cells …
Since I’ve been pretty much housebound because of my fractured humerus, I finally decided to go through our closets and get rid of all the clothes we don’t/can’t wear anymore. Of course, I have to be careful not to hurt my shoulder, and believe me, careful I am! But I can’t just lie around with the cats (our Pixie, in the photo) and watch TV series nonstop…   Speaking of my shoulder, well it’s healing…and healing well, I think. I can now raise my arm above my head. Compare that to a month ago when I could barely lift my arm! Thank you, physiotherapy! I have my third checkup,...
Source: Margaret's Corner - July 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll bone cancer curcumin Source Type: blogs

My physical therapy … and cardiac toxicity caused by carfilzomib
First, my big news: I began physiotherapy yesterday, and, drum roll!!!, I won’t have to wear my shoulder brace anymore, or rather, “you don’t have to wear it unless you feel as though you need it,” my physiotherapist told me. She reassured me that there’s no way I could make my shoulder worse unless she jumped up and down on it. And, since that’s not likely to happen, I agreed that the brace should come off. It had become sort of like a Linus blanket (Peanuts reference) for me…I felt safe with it! My physiotherapist pointed out that keeping my arm in a brace at home would have a n...
Source: Margaret's Corner - June 20, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll cardiac toxicity carfilzomib carfilzomib toxicity Source Type: blogs

Healing
This morning I went back to the hospital for a checkup on my fractured (proximal) humerus. Good news, mostly. The orthopedist was quite happy with how my shoulder is healing (I wonder if the healing process has been helped along by my daily intake of curcumin…? Curcumin has been used in traditional medicine to treat bone fractures…hmmm, interesting…). It’s going to take a while, though, before I’ll be able to use my arm normally and go back to my regular bungee jumping (haha, just kidding!!! I mean, kidding about the bungee jumping, of course… ). More good news: next week I can ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - June 14, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll proximal humerus fracture Source Type: blogs

No surgery!!!
Yesterday I went to the hospital to see an orthopedic surgeon who told me to use my left hand as much as possible from now on, so this morning I thought I’d give typing with two hands a try, even though my arm is still in a sling, of course, and I’m not supposed to move my left shoulder at all. Yep, yep, yep, this works…for a short post, anyway… The orthopedist told me that my fracture is borderline for surgery. I’d actually been told the same thing last Monday, so I knew surgery might be in the picture. Aggghhhh!!! For a moment, yesterday, I froze… When I told her about my smoldering...
Source: Margaret's Corner - May 29, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

Fracture!
This will be a quick post because I can type only with one hand. Reason: on Saturday, during a weekend trip with Stefano and friends in Maremma, a lovely area in southern Tuscany, I lost my balance while exploring an archaeological site and fell. Hard. On my left shoulder. Bam! We didn’t go to the local hospital because nothing seemed to be broken. I was in pain but could move my hand and even my shoulder a bit. I couldn’t lift my arm but we figured it was just because the muscles had taken a hit. We went to  a pharmacy to get a painkiller and a sling for my arm, and that was that. We kept on sightseeing, ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - May 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

Marital life
Excerpt from a conversation Stefano and I had a couple of evenings ago… Margaret: If you could go back in time, would you still marry me? Stefano:  No. Margaret (taken aback): Noooo? Why not? Stefano: I wouldn’t marry anyone who would ask such a dumb question. Margaret: Ohhhh…(pause)…Well, would you STILL marry me? Stefano (looking up from his iPad): Of course I would!!! Phew.   (Source: Margaret's Corner)
Source: Margaret's Corner - May 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

20 years
ago, on this day, Stefano and I got married. One of the happiest days of my life. I’ve written wedding anniversary posts before, so I’ll keep this one short…I just want to say how lucky I am to have found such an extraordinary man…brilliant, funny, supportive, loving, wise…the list goes on… Thank you for all these years, Stefano…and for the ones to come! Ti amo. Buon anniversario! (Source: Margaret's Corner)
Source: Margaret's Corner - May 8, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll wedding anniversary Source Type: blogs

Taking off
Just briefly…I wanted to say that tomorrow Stefano and I are zooming off for about 10 days (= holiday…yaaaaay!) with a couple of our friends. I don’t know if I’ll have access to Internet during that time, so I just thought I’d publish a quick post. Well, I hope you’ll have as much fun as I plan to have!!! Take care, everyone! Ciaoooo!   (Source: Margaret's Corner)
Source: Margaret's Corner - April 18, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

A terrible loss for everyone
Since yesterday evening, this is what I’ve been hearing on the news: it’s a terrible loss for Catholics, it’s a terrible loss for people of all faiths… Of course it is, but let’s not exclude anyone. What happened yesterday in Paris is a terrible loss for everyone, even for non-believers like me. I broke down and wept when I saw the footage of the fire devastating the medieval cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris. Horrifying… Simply horrifying… Stefano and I were in Paris in August of 2018. We were very lucky to have a great view of Notre Dame and the surrounding area from our hotel ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Notre Dame Source Type: blogs

High school principal dies after donating bone marrow …
Thanks to Karen for providing the link to this incredible story. At first, like other readers, I thought he’d donated his stem cells to try to save the life of a teenager in France, but no, he’d donated his bone marrow. Still, I’d never heard of anything like this…I wonder if he had an allergic reaction to the drugs…? Anyway, I suppose we’ll learn more in the coming days… Here’s the CNN article: https://cnn.it/2P4nV0z I’m feeling rather stunned… (Source: Margaret's Corner)
Source: Margaret's Corner - April 11, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll high school principal dies after donating bone marrow Source Type: blogs

Specific criteria needed for different types of myeloma
Yesterday I came across a Science Daily article discussing a recent study on the need to have different diagnostic criteria for the kappa and lambda types of myeloma. Apparently some patients with the lambda type go undiagnosed, based on current criteria. Here’s the link: http://bit.ly/2GfulHf And here’s an excerpt: “Current testing trends lean toward looking in the serum only which also can lead to problems detecting lambda-associated conditions.” I wonder how many have had that problem…? (Source: Margaret's Corner)
Source: Margaret's Corner - April 10, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll lambda myeloma Source Type: blogs

Exposure to permethrin increases risk of developing multiple myeloma
I just read a bit of news that I thought I’d share here on the blog. A new study shows that exposure (NOTE: “a high lifetime exposure“) to an insecticide called permethrin increases one’s risk of developing MM. This insecticide is used in public health mosquito control programs, for example. Eeeeek! Here’s the article, for those interested: http://bit.ly/2G1haJN I’ve been reading some interesting stuff lately…I just have to find the time to post about it all! Anyway, have a great weekend, everyone! Ciao!   (Source: Margaret's Corner)
Source: Margaret's Corner - April 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll insecticide myeloma permethrin Source Type: blogs

Let it cool down!
I already knew about the dangers of drinking very hot tea, and this is confirmed by a new study: it can almost DOUBLE your risk of cancer, esophageal cancer. I read about it a couple of days ago in this CNN article…interesting read, have a look: http://goo.gl/F6jC6N Here’s an excerpt: “Researchers found that tea drinkers who liked their beverage to be warmer than 60 degrees Celsius (140 degrees Fahrenheit) and consumed more than 700 ml of tea per day — about two large cups — had a 90% higher risk of esophageal cancer, when compared to those who drank less tea and at cooler temperat...
Source: Margaret's Corner - March 24, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll esophageal cancer hot tea Source Type: blogs

Tough germs
Well, well…well. I mean, you try to be oh soooo careful whenever you set foot outside your house, especially during the flu season…For example: you never go food shopping during peak times you avoid seeing friends if they have the slightest sniffle you never shake hands or kiss anyone, or, well, you try not to… My “try to avoid getting sick” list goes on and on…I repeat, I try to be sooo careful. I always carry a little bottle of hand sanitizer in my purse, for emergencies, such as, well, let’s say that, due to social circumstances, I’ve been forced to shake hands with ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - March 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll germs and myeloma Source Type: blogs

Ufbp1: a potential new target for multiple myeloma
Some interesting news this morning: for the first time, a group of researchers has reported on the essential role that a specific protein, called Ufbp1, plays in the development and function of plasma cells. Now, we don’t really need to know all the complicated steps involved in this process…Here’s what’s relevant to us: when Ufbp1 becomes upregulated (that is, when there is too much of it),  the development process of plasma cells can go wacky and give rise to allergies, autoimmune diseases, and, tada!, multiple myeloma. Therefore, if researchers can find a way to manipulate and control the e...
Source: Margaret's Corner - March 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll multiple myeloma Ufbp1 Source Type: blogs

Busybusybusy!!!
How did I let a month, well, almost a month go by without posting even something silly??? Dear me!!! Thing is, I’ve been super busy, with a million and a half things to do, including some long overdue house improvement projects, which have been taking up a lot of my time, especially since Pandora, = one of the two incredibly adorable kittens we adopted about a year and a half ago, simply loves to, er, HELP me. She follows every move I make, and often intervenes. And so, thanks to her, a task that should ordinarily take only one hour to complete can take up to two hours…Of course, she’s such an entertaini...
Source: Margaret's Corner - March 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

Diamond Jubilee Galleries and the circadian rhythm
Lately, I’ve been so caught up with stuff to do that I haven’t had time to post anything, not even a simple, quick post about our recent long weekend trip to London, which mainly turned into a Harry Potter tour (see last photo…and yes, I stood in line for about a half hour so that Stefano could take a photo of me waving a wand at Platform 9 and 3/4, King’s Cross station; I now am also the proud owner of a lovely Gryffindor scarf, currently my most precious possession ). Note: we also met with a good British friend of ours AND visited a couple of museums. OThe best, though, was our tour of Westminst...
Source: Margaret's Corner - February 7, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll circadian rhythm Source Type: blogs

The Terminal
I had a FANTASTIC time in London last week with my friend and Stefano, but I’ll tell you about that another day. Today I wanted to let you know what happened at the airport on Sunday, because it might be useful to anyone who has future travel plans to Europe… Let’s see. I went online to get my boarding pass on Saturday evening. Everything was fine up to the very end, when I got a message stating that there were some problems with my travel documents, and that I needed to go to an airport check-in desk the following day, that is, departure day. We left the hotel a bit early in order to see what the &ldquo...
Source: Margaret's Corner - January 23, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll passport expiry Source Type: blogs

London!
First things first. I’ve been trying to sort through my Alsatian photos…Yes, we were in Alsace, lovely Alsace!, for the holidays…I wanted to surprise you, but too much time has passed, so I might as well…fess up! Here, finally, are a few photos of Strasbourg, where we spent the first part of our trip, including Xmas. The first photo shows a view of what is called Petite France, a lovely area of the city… Anyway, as I mentioned, I have been trying to sort through my photos, but life keeps getting in the way, so much stuff to do, blablabla. You know how it is. This evening, for example, e...
Source: Margaret's Corner - January 12, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

Auguri!!!!!!!!
Stefano and I are leaving today for France where we will be spending the holidays…in a region we’ve never visited before. Very VERY exciting!  Before leaving, I wanted to post a photo of our kitties with a festive look (so cute!), but I’m having a few computer burps this morning, no time to fix them, so I’ll just have to say: Happy Holidays, Buone Feste!!! And may 2019 bring several IL-17 antagonists (!), good health (yessss!) and happiness to all of us! Yaaaay!!! Take care, everyone! See you…next year! BUONE FESTE!!! (Source: Margaret's Corner)
Source: Margaret's Corner - December 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

Distracted
I try to focus on my  Prevotella heparinolytica research, I really do!, but stuff keeps popping (or pooping, hehe) up to distract me, such as this BBC article on wombat poop: http://goo.gl/y2TYwD. Wombat poop? Yep! (Aren’t they just the cutest animals?) Did you know wombats are the ONLY creatures in the entire world that are able to poop out…cube-shaped poop? They apparently use these small cubes to communicate and attract other wombats. Hmmm. Anyway, yes, a fascinating article, accompanied by photos of said poop, too.    Another “distraction”: I’ve begun my annual routine...
Source: Margaret's Corner - December 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll BBC wombat wombat poop Source Type: blogs

Gut bacteria plays a big role in the progression to active myeloma, according to a new Italian study
One of my Italian blog readers sent me this link today: http://goo.gl/AEwRXo I realize the article is in Italian, but hey, you’re in luck : you can read the full study, on which the Italian article is based, in English…at this link: http://goo.gl/9U8NoN In any case, I’m going to give you a brief summary (based only on the article. I need more time to read/go through the full study). Here goes. Researchers at the Ospedale di San Raffaele in Milan have discovered that a particular type of gut bacteria, called Prevotella heparinolytica, plays a big role in the proliferation of some of the inf...
Source: Margaret's Corner - December 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Arianna Brevi gut bacteria myeloma Prevotella heparinolytica Source Type: blogs

A cold is almost never just a cold …
So much to do, so little time. And I wasn’t supposed to get a COUGH again, either. No, I’m not kidding. I know where I was infected. To make a very long story short, exactly a week ago I accompanied a friend (who has very little Italian) and her 5-year-old daughter to a pediatric dentist. We had to wait for a couple of hours (the dentist was very busy and behind schedule) in a small, airless waiting room with other adults and their…kids. Yes, I’m well aware of the danger of my being around potentially ill kids, especially in a situation like that where I couldn’t escape, but my friend needed ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - November 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

Almost spitting images
One of my best friends here in Florence gave me a lovely present the other day. It was supposed to be a Xmas present, but my friend was so excited and eager to see my reaction that she couldn’t wait until December. She had ordered two small, woolen versions of Pixie and Pandora (my 14-month-old sisters) from an Italian woman who specializes in the needle felting technique, which I believe originated in Japan and is quite ancient. My friend didn’t have any up-to-date photos of the two sisters, so, while we were away in Matera, she asked our cat sitter to be her accomplice…Photos were taken and sent o...
Source: Margaret's Corner - November 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll cats needle felting technique Source Type: blogs

Matera, the 2019 European capital of culture
The weekend of November 1st was a long holiday weekend, so Stefano and I, and his aunt and uncle (yes, the uncle with MM), decided to visit the ancient southern Italian city of Matera, designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1993. It is also one of the OLDEST CONTINUOUSLY INHABITED cities in the entire world. How about that, eh! In 2014, Matera was also awarded the title of 2019 European city of culture and since then has become a big tourist attraction. By the time we managed to book a B&B, in fact, Matera was 97% booked! Matera is mainly famous for its Sassi (Italian for “Stones”), for its 1500 cave...
Source: Margaret's Corner - November 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Matera Source Type: blogs

Concern over too much EGCG
I just finished reading a BBC article about a man in Texas who had been taking an EGCG (extracted from green tea) supplement for 2-3 months when he found out that his liver was in very bad shape, to the point that he had to have an urgent liver transplant. His doctors ruled out everything else and concluded that this serious injury may have been caused by the EGCG supplement. Even though I personally don’t take EGCG, I was horrified, at first. Then I read the article, which states that drinking green tea, as I do on occasion, is perfectly safe. What you have to be careful about is its extract, known as EGCG, which ap...
Source: Margaret's Corner - October 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll EGCG EGCG toxicity green tea liver injury Source Type: blogs

Broncopolmonite!
I realize it’s been quite some TIME since I’ve written a post, almost a MONTH!, so today I decided to sit down and write one, and it’s going to be a long one, so get yourselves some tea and get comfy…    CHAPTER ONE. PEEKABOO: in September I spent a lot of time researching possibly helpful but definitely non-toxic treatments for Peekaboo, my 11-year-old kitty whom I’ve written a lot about in recent times. She has a slipped disc, basically, and has been having a VERY hard time walking. The risk, of course, is that she’d stop walking altogether. Couldn’t let that happen! I...
Source: Margaret's Corner - October 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs

September is Blood Cancer Awareness Month
When, many many years ago (19, but who’s counting? ), my doctor uttered those two words, “mieloma multiplo,” I thought he’d said: “melanoma.” Who’d ever heard of multiple myeloma??? Ahhhh, how things change!!! And today, thanks to my research, mixed in with quite a bit of determination (stubbornness?), and, oh yes, quite a bit of luck, I’m doing okay:  No CRAB symptoms. No conventional treatments. Just…curcumin (mainly). And, for sure!, lots of awareness!!! (Source: Margaret's Corner)
Source: Margaret's Corner - September 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll mieloma multiplo; myeloma multiple myeloma Source Type: blogs

A Fairy Pools anecdote
The Fairy Pools are a series of waterfalls and crystal-clear green/blue pools located on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. it’s an absolutely beautiful spot…highly recommended…My photos don’t do it justice, but you can check online for MUCH better ones. We spent an entire morning there, walking slowly up the hill, taking in the views, stopping to admire the waterfalls and pools, aaaah and the colors!…and taking lots of photos, of course! It usually takes about 45 minutes (each way) to complete the uphill walk without stopping, but how can you NOT stop? It’s simply stunning everywhere you lo...
Source: Margaret's Corner - September 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Fairy Pools Isle of Skye Scotland Source Type: blogs

Memories of Scotland
Instead of going on and on about each place we visited in Scotland, I’ve decided to put together a series of anecdotes, cute or funny things that happened during our stay there. First, though, here is a descriptive list of most of the places we visited, starting from Glasgow and ending in Edinburgh: We spent a day and a half in Glasgow. To be honest, and I hope I don’t offend those who live there, as far as I could tell, there isn’t much to see, from a tourist’s point of view, except for the cathedral, but it’s very good for shopping, and it’s a very lively city. We also photographed a ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - September 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Culross Desperate Dan dinosaur prints Drumnadrochit Dundee Dunnolie Dunnottar Edinburgh Eilean Donan Harry Potter Highland Games Islay Kilchurn Castle Plockton Scotland Skye Source Type: blogs

Two cortisone stories involving Peekaboo and yours truly …
First, the news about Peekaboo. When I met with the vet a few days ago, he repeated that we wouldn’t be able to give her the current anti-inflammatory drug forever. Too bad, since she eagerly takes it in her wet food in the morning, and it seems to have no side effects. Oh well. He suggested I substitute it with a drug called Contramal, which is basically Tramadol, and with another one that contains quercetin (I checked it out, it’s okay, so she’s on that now). Tramadol is a different story. That’s the drug that Piccolo was on for some time last summer, and I am CONVINCED (although I have no proof, ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - September 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll cortisone Medrol Source Type: blogs

Back from Scotland
We’re baaaack! Back in Florence with our kitties, that is. Actually, we’ve been home since last Wednesday, but I’ve had lots of things to do, PLUS my computer wasn’t working properly, so Stefano spent the entire weekend fixing it, checking it out, updating programs, and so on. I’m so lucky to have him (in so many ways!)! About our fabulous holiday in Scotland…so hard to decide where to begin…And so I’ve made a partial list of some of my fondest memories, as follows: One of the funniest things: animals of all sorts (goats, sheep, chickens, cows…) in the middle o...
Source: Margaret's Corner - September 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Harry Potter Islay Scotland Skye whisky Source Type: blogs

New test results and other bits of news
As you may recall, my April “andrographolide” results were disappointing, although some MM markers did improve. But my IgG jumped up quite a bit. But now, incredibly, in just three months, and in spite of ALL the stress I’ve been under in the past weeks, my new, August test results are, well, excellent!!! My IgG has gone down to less than it was in 2012. Obviously, it’s still high, but it’s back to where I prefer it to be. So I’m pleased. VERY pleased. Incidentally, all I took in this period was curcumin (the usual 8  grams a day) and Reishi, which has done well for me for the seco...
Source: Margaret's Corner - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll curcumin bioavailability Source Type: blogs

The margins are CLEAR!!!
Peekaboo, my 11-year-old cat, is such a star. Our amazing little star…And yes, in case you’re wondering, all of these photos are recent, post-surgery photos. Obviously, her right side looks better than her left, as you can see…But once her fur grows back, she’ll be as good as new (not that that’s the most important thing, of course!). Here’s the most important thing: Our vet just called to let us know that the final results of Peekaboo’s mandibulectomy (half of her lower left jaw was removed) show CLEAR MARGINS. In other words, no cancer cells were found in the outer portion of ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - August 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll feline oral cancer feline oral melanoma Source Type: blogs

Forskolin: another natural compound goes on my list of myeloma killers
Yesterday I came across a 2015 study that really caught my attention. A group of Norwegian researchers has discovered that the combination of dexamethasone with a natural compound called forskolin kills multiple myeloma cells. They tested forskolin with other conventional myeloma drugs, too: bortezomib (Velcade), cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and melphalan. And by itself. Results in a nutshell: dead myeloma cells.    Excerpt from the abstract: “Our findings support a potential role of forskolin in combination with current conventional agents in the treatment of MM.” The researchers believe that ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - August 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll forskolin myeloma Source Type: blogs

Curcumin eye drops
I’ve been reading and researching curcumin for almost 13 years now, but I am still amazed at all the things it can do… A new study shows that it might be able to treat the early stages of glaucoma: goo.gl/W98w8x That’s music to my ears, since glaucoma runs in my family…hmmmm, my eye pressure happens to be normal…I wonder if my high intake of curcumin might have something to do with that? Excerpt from the above-mentioned Science Daily article: “‘Curcumin is an exciting compound that has shown promise at detecting and treating the neurodegeneration implicated in numerous eye ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - July 30, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll curcumin glaucoma Source Type: blogs

Light at the end of the tunnel
We brought Peekaboo home from the clinic almost a week ago, last Saturday evening to be exact. I thought that she’d slowly return to her usual self once she got home, but it has taken longer than expected. Reason: we ran into a few problems… Problem number 1. Like most (all?) cats, Peekaboo was REALLY bothered by the Elizabethan collar, a cone-shaped torture device that prevents cats and dogs from licking or scratching or biting their wounds (Note: these three photos of Peekaboo are “post-Elizabethan-collar” photos. The white and red stuff around her neck is just a temporary bandage that doesn&rsq...
Source: Margaret's Corner - July 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll mandibulectomy in a cat Source Type: blogs

Quick update on Peekaboo
I took our cat, Peekaboo, to the vet two days ago, around lunchtime. When her new CAT scan results came in, my vet told me that, even though the melanoma had spread a bit in the past two weeks, the cancer hadn’t gone into the jawbone yet. She recommended that we do the surgery. After asking a few obvious but almost-impossible-to-answer questions (will the surgery PROLONG HER LIFE without impacting her QUALITY OF LIFE, blablabla), I called Stefano, and we both agreed it was our only choice at this point, even though there really aren’t any guarantees: this sort of cancer is very aggressive, so it may come back a...
Source: Margaret's Corner - July 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll cat surgery feline oral cancer feline oral melanoma Source Type: blogs

It ’ s not just malignant. It ’ s very aggressive.
All of Peekaboo’s test results are in (see my July 4 post; Peekaboo is one of our cats…11 years old…I took the above photo of her in 2015). The biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of an aggressive malignant oral melanoma. I won’t go on and on about all the discussions Stefano and I (and friends and family) have had in the past couple of weeks, especially this past weekend…all the going back and forth (surgery…or no surgery???), all the online research we’ve done, reading horrible stories on various cat forums, the heartbreak, the anxiety…”what should we DO???”&hel...
Source: Margaret's Corner - July 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll feline oral melanoma mandibulectomy in a cat Source Type: blogs

A case report: the antibiotic roxithromycin induces PR in a patient with smoldering myeloma
Well…Well…WELL!!! I’ve got a very interesting item for you today… Many many many thanks to my blog reader Charlotte for this gem: goo.gl/hMsWov The link will lead you to a case report about a 86-year-old patient (with IgA lambda smoldering myeloma) who went into partial remission after taking roxithromycin, an antibiotic, for just ONE MONTH. This happened last year in New Zealand. The patient’s paraprotein, which had been increasing since he was diagnosed in 2008, dropped from 46 g/L to 20 g/L. That’s a 57% decrease! Wowsie. And another thing: in addition to his other markers re...
Source: Margaret's Corner - July 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll myeloma roxithromycin Roxithromycin monotherapy inducing a partial response in a patient with myeloma: a case report Source Type: blogs

“ Crystal structure reveals how curcumin impairs cancer ”
Wow, VERY EXCITING BIT OF NEWS that popped up in my Google Alerts yesterday. My post title is the title of a new study revealing a previously unreported biochemical activity of curcumin. This very important study, carried out by three research teams (University of California San Diego School of Medicine, Peking University, and Zhejiang University), shows how curcumin attaches to, and INHIBITS, a gene called DYRK2, which is associated with cellular growth and/or development. This inhibition diminishes the proliferation of cancer cells. It reduces the tumor burden.  How about THAT? Here’s the link to the ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - July 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Crystal Structure Reveals How Curcumin Impairs Cancer University of California San Diego School of Medicine Source Type: blogs

Possible case of feline oral (malignant) melanoma
Because our 11-year-old cat, Peekaboo, has been very aggressive toward the new kittens…stalking them, pushing them into corners and then hitting them until, screeching like hyenas, thus giving us heart attacks, they manage to escape (mind you, she doesn’t hurt them, no blood is shed, e.g., but she really scares them, and that isn’t nice at all!), I finally took her to the vet clinic yesterday morning for a checkup. When, back in May, I took Pandora and Pixie to the clinic to be spayed, I spoke about this aggressive behavior with the vets who agreed with me that Peekaboo might have some sort of painful ph...
Source: Margaret's Corner - July 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll cat oral melanoma oral melanoma in cats Source Type: blogs

For the first time, the FDA approves a CBD-containing drug
As I have written in previous posts, CBD, or cannabidiol, an active ingredient of marijuana, kills myeloma cells, so the news I came across early this morning is of huge interest to me. In a nutshell, for the first time ever, the FDA has approved a CBD-containing oral solution (= a strawberry-flavored syrup) for the treatment of rare but severe forms of epilepsy in children. Note: this syrup does not contain THC, the ingredient in marijuana that makes people “high.” It may not come without side effects, such as sleepiness and increased liver enzymes (like most anti-seizure drugs, it appears), as you can read in...
Source: Margaret's Corner - June 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll CBD Epidiolex Source Type: blogs

A new commission looks into the adverse effects of blood cancer treatments
This morning I read an IMPORTANT Science Daily article on how the adverse effects, tolerability, and toxicities of conventional treatments for blood cancers (including myeloma, of course) have not been reported/disclosed as well as they should have been, to put it mildly. See: goo.gl/ou9CNg Well, this may change soon enough: a new commission set up by The Lancet Haematology has been looking into these adverse effects and toxicities, considering in particular the long-term, chronic effects that don’t go away even after the completion of treatment, such as neuropathy, which can be crippling. Quality of life has al...
Source: Margaret's Corner - June 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll adverse effects blood cancers Lancet Haematology myeloma neuropathy Source Type: blogs

Food items we should avoid “ like the plague ” …
I just read a very interesting interview with/article about a food poisoning lawyer (imagine that…!!!) who shares his knowledge about food, potentially contaminated food. And some of it isn’t so obvious. That is why I’m posting the link to the article, as a warning/reminder to those of us who have weakened immune systems: goo.gl/NG3oty I never buy prepackaged (washed? Hah!) salad, e.g., or anything that has been cut and washed by others. I never go near salad bars, no matter how clean the restaurant looks. Bacteria bacteria bacteria! Better be safe than sorry… After my SMM diagnosis, I began ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - June 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll food poisoning sprouts Source Type: blogs

Researchers test curcumin in new bone-building study
After enhancing the bioavailability of curcumin using polymers, a group of Washington State University researchers proved that curcumin can increase bone growth by between 30% and 45%  in a matter of weeks: “The presence of curcumin in TCP results in enhanced bone formation after 6 weeks.” (Quoted from the abstract.) The researchers are currently testing other natural extracts as well, namely “aloe vera, saffron, Vitamin D, garlic, oregano and ginger [… ] that might help with bone disorders, including those that encourage bone growth or that have anti-inflammatory, infection control, or a...
Source: Margaret's Corner - June 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll bone building bone formation curcumin myeloma Source Type: blogs