Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 21st 2020
In this study, we have found that administration of a specific Sgk1 inhibitor significantly reduces the dysregulated form of tau protein that is a pathological hallmark of AD, restores prefrontal cortical synaptic function, and mitigates memory deficits in an AD model. These results have identified Sgk1 as a potential key target for therapeutic intervention of AD, which may have specific and precise effects." Targeting histone K4 trimethylation for treatment of cognitive and synaptic deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease Epigenetic aberration is implicated in aging and neurodegeneration. Us...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Quality of Epigenetic Clocks Continues to Improve
There is at present a diverse exploration of clocks that assess biological age, these clocks constructed as weighted combinations of data picked from the epigenome, transcriptome, or proteome, all of which change in characteristic ways with age. Many different clocks are at various stages of development and refinement. The goal is the production of a robust, low-cost, rapid way to assess the efficacy of potential rejuvenation therapies: if one can use a blood test ten days before and ten days after a treatment, that would be a great deal easier than having to wait and see over the course of a life span. Unfortunate...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 16, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

“VRx”: A Medgadget Book Interview with Author Dr. Brennan Spiegel
In the recently released science-fiction novel Ready Player Two, protagonist Wade Watts spends the majority of the book inside a virtual reality universe called the “OASIS”. Though the OASIS is merely a simulation consisting of computer-generated imagery, immersive sound, and gesture-based interaction, it has a profound impact on reality. It’s a place where one loses the sense of time, both physical and emotional pain is identified and eased, and users can confront and overcome their deepest longings and fears. The OASIS may be fictional, but some of its seemingly therapeutic effects are factual, b...
Source: Medgadget - December 8, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Exclusive Informatics Medicine Pain Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Trial by Error: FDA Approves Web-CBT for IBS; GET/CBT as Tomorrow ’ s “ Rubbish ”
By David Tuller, DrPH Mahana set to announce FDA approval for ineffective IBS program Earlier this year, I spent a lot of time blogging about the unethical and dishonest manner in which a San Francisco start-up called Mahana Therapeutics was promoting an eight-week web-based program of cognitive behavior therapy for patients suffering from irritable bowel […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - December 7, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized british journal of general practice CBT IBS mahana Matthew Holt ross-morris Trudie Chalder Source Type: blogs

Treating the pain of endometriosis
Many women suffer through years of painful menstrual periods before they are able to get an answer about what’s causing them: a common and often undiagnosed condition called endometriosis. What is endometriosis? Endometriosis is a condition that occurs when tissue much like the tissue that lines a woman’s uterus — called the endometrium — starts to grow in other places inside the body. Most commonly, these growths are within the pelvis, such as on the ovaries, the fallopian tubes, the outer surface of the uterus, or the bladder. During the menstrual cycle each month, the tissue lining the uterus gro...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Pain Management Stress Surgery Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Coping With IBS
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be painful, annoying, and embarrassing. There is currently no cure for this complex condition, and managing its symptoms and flare-ups is tricky. So, coping mechanisms are a constant need. What are the symptoms of IBS? IBS is a gastrointestinal disorder in which your gut becomes more sensitive, and the muscles of your digestive system have abnormal contractions. People with IBS usually have abdominal pain along with frequent changes in bowel habits (diarrhea, constipation, or alternating between both). Other common symptoms include bloating and gas urge to move the bowels, but being unab...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Solan Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Mental Health Stress Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 26th 2020
In conclusion, all NAFLD histological stages were associated with significantly increased overall mortality, and this risk increased progressively with worsening NAFLD histology. Most of this excess mortality was from extrahepatic cancer and cirrhosis, while in contrast, the contributions of cardiovascular disease and HCC were modest. BMP6 as a Target for Pro-Angiogenic Therapies https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/10/bmp6-as-a-target-for-pro-angiogenic-therapies/ Today's research materials are focused on the fine details of angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, and point to BMP6 as a po...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 25, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Interventions Targeting the Aging of the Gut Microbiome
Age-related changes to the microbial populations of the gut, the gut microbiome, appear important in the progression of aging. The effects on long-term health and risk of age-related conditions might be on a par with those of physical activity, and certainly overlap with those of diet. With ageing, beneficial microbes that produce metabolites (such as butyrate) that lead to better tissue function diminish in number, while harmful microbes that spur chronic inflammation grow in number. This may be due to loss of immune system competency, as the immune system gardens the gut microbiome, or it may be due to diminished intesti...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 19, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 21st 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Recent Studies on the Changing Gut Microbiome in Aging
Today's research materials are a selection of recent studies on the gut microbiome and its relationship to the aging process. The scientific community has in recent years uncovered a great deal of new information regarding the way in which the gut microbiome both influences health and exhibits detrimental changes with age. Some of the microbes of the digestive tract are responsible for the generation of beneficial metabolites such as butyrate, indoles, and propionate. Unfortunately these populations decline in number with advancing age, and this negatively impacts tissue function throughout the body. Additionally, harmful ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The Diet That Reduces Stomach Bloating
Bloating is a frequent symptom of irritable bowel syndrome and is triggered by specific types of diet. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - July 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mina Dean Tags: Stomach bloating Source Type: blogs

Interesting To See What Research Into Medical Technology Is Being Funded By Commonwealth Government Grant
This release appeared last week:$18.8 million to supercharge digital health technologies The Australian Government is investing $18.8 million to supercharge the discovery of better treatments for cancer, epilepsy, stroke, paralysis, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, brain injuries, back pain and chronic middle ear disease. The Hon Greg Hunt MP Minister for Health Date published: 20 July 2020The Morrison Government is investing $18.8 million to supercharge the discovery of better treatments for cancer, epilepsy, stroke, paralysis, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, brain injuries, back pain and chronic middle ear disease.Under round t...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - July 28, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

The lowdown on the low-FODMAP diet
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common intestinal disorder that produces distressing symptoms like abdominal pain, significant bloating, and altered bowel movements that can shuttle between diarrhea and constipation. While changing what you eat won’t cure you, an evidence-based approach called the low-FODMAP diet is the most frequently prescribed food plan to help relieve IBS symptoms. Studies show it can reduce symptoms for the majority of patients. However, because of certain challenges and risks associated with the low-FODMAP diet, it’s worth talking to an expert before you try it. FODMAP basics  Th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Gelsomin, MLA, RD, LDN Tags: Digestive Disorders Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Secondary gain: really?
One of my most popular posts ever is one I wrote many years ago on malingering. Secondary gain, like malingering or symptom magnification is one of those terms used by people who don’t live with persistent pain, and commonly used when a person with pain doesn’t seem to be progressing “as expected”. The term is an old one, originating in the psychoanalytic literature, brought into compensation and insurance environments but never really examined (Fishbain, Rosomoff, Cutler & Rosomoff, 1995) until well after it had become a popular label. Freud first identified the potential for gains from bei...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - July 12, 2020 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Assessment Chronic pain Professional topics Research malingering secondary gain stigma Source Type: blogs

Gastrointestinal Diseases in America: The Costly Impact on Employers and Patients
SPONSORED POST By SAM HOLLIDAY Medically reviewed by Jenny Blair, MD Gastrointestinal diseases like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are more prevalent—and costlier—than many employers realize. Up to 70 million Americans are affected by gastrointestinal (GI) diseases each year—twice as many people as those living with diabetes (34.2 million).[1],[2] Overall direct healthcare costs for GI diseases are estimated to be $136 billion each year in the U.S., more than heart disease ($113bn) and mental health disorders ($99bn...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech gastrointestinal diseases Oshi Health Sam Holliday Source Type: blogs

Probiotics — even inactive ones — may relieve IBS symptoms
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gut-brain disorder that can cause a variety of uncomfortable gastrointestinal symptoms including abdominal pain and diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of the two. IBS can reduce quality of life, often results in missed school or work, and can have a substantial economic impact. Physicians diagnose IBS by identifying symptoms laid out in the Rome Criteria, a set of diagnostic measures developed by a group of more than 100 international experts. Limited diagnostic testing is also done, to help exclude other conditions that could present with similar symptoms. Although the precise cau...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Anthony Lembo, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Probiotics Source Type: blogs

Why your bowels are making you sick
The intestinal microbiome plays a huge role in how you feel, your mental outlook, how well you sleep, as well as your health. It can be responsible for health conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, restless leg syndrome, type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes, hypertension, fatty liver, autoimmune and neurodegenerative conditions. It has become easier to identify, then manage, your intestinal microbiome and you don’t even need a doctor to do it. The post Why your bowels are making you sick appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 20, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open bowel flora microbiota prebiotic probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Trio of Trials Shows Limits of CBT for Medically Unexplained Symptoms
Lancet Psychiatry recently published the results of a high-profile trial of cognitive behavior therapy as a treatment for so-called dissociative seizures, also known as psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The trial, nicknamed CODES, found that CBT had no impact on seizure frequency–the primary outcome. The average number of seizures per month dropped in both the treatment and […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - June 17, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized CBT CODES irritable bowel syndrome PACE Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: My Letter to IBS Study ’ s Corresponding Author
By David Tuller, DrPH I am slowly getting back to my efforts to highlight Mahana Therapeutics’ continuing misrepresentation of its new web-based cognitive behavior therapy program for irritable bowel syndrome. In January, the start-up company that it had licensed the program from King’s College London, based on a high-profile study published last year in Gut, […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 5, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Bread, paper, and other indigestible objects
Olivia posted this incredible story of wheat-free release in the comments on this blog some time back. Her story so powerfully encapsulates how far off course health can go by consuming this thing called “wheat,” that I thought it was worth sharing with everybody again. During her wheat-consuming days, Olivia was clearly suffering body-wide inflammation and other effects that were being ineffectively “treated” by her doctor, effects largely due to the indigestible or only partially-digestible proteins from the seeds of grasses AKA wheat. As often happens, she managed to reverse the entire collection...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 29, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open gluten-free grain-free grains wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Another Nudge to Mahana ’ s Gasteroenterology Advisers
By David Tuller, DrPH Back in February, I wrote to some science advisers to Mahana Therapeutics to alert them to the company’s unjustified claims about the impact of its web-based program on the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Two of them–Dr Peter Lu and Dr Carlo di Lorenzo–are gastroenterology specialists at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - April 28, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Revisiting Mahana and Irritable Bowel Syndrome …
By David Tuller, DrPH As the world continues to wrestle with the coronavirus epidemic, President Trump is calling on us here in the US to get back to work. So I decided to start seeking answers again from Mahana Therapeutics, which announced in January that it had licensed a web-based cognitive behavior therapy program for […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - April 15, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: David Tuller ME/CFS Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: A Non-COVID Post about KCL ’ s Rejection of My FOI Request
By David Tuller, DrPH In the days before coronavirus was everything, I was writing about a major study of cognitive behavior therapy for irritable bowel syndrome. The study tested telephone-delivered cognitive behavior therapy, web-based CBT against treatment-as-usual for IBS symptom severity and other more generic domains. Although the pre-COVID era feels like ancient history already, […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - April 8, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Low-carb diets: Only the START to regain health and lose weight
While a low-carb diet is an excellent choice to achieve goals such as weight loss, stacking the odds in favor of reversing type 2 diabetes and fatty liver, and beginning the process of reversing skin rashes and autoimmune diseases, you don’t want to make the mistake of ending your efforts at diet alone. Regardless of the variety of low-carb diet you choose—Atkins, paleo, keto, Wheat Belly, Undoctored, etc.—failure to add several components, especially prebiotic fibers that nourish bowel flora, can limit or even undo all of your health benefits. You can further your success by also addressing common nutri...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 2, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open grain-free microbiota prebiotic Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Another Letter About Mahana; BerkeleyWellness on IBS Study
By David Tuller, DrPH I have been trying to find out why Mahana Therapeutics, a San Francisco-based start-up, has chosen to disseminate misleading information about a web-based cognitive behavior therapy program for people with irritable bowel syndrome. Because Mahana’s co-founder and CEO, Rob Paull, has not responded to my letters, I have contacted some of […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - February 24, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: My Follow-up Letter to Mahana Therapeutics ’ CEO
By David Tuller, DrPH Last week, I wrote to Rob Paull, the co-founder and CEO of Mahana Therapeutics, regarding the company’s misleading claims about the web-based cognitive behavior therapy program for irritable bowel syndrome it recently licensed from King’s College London. I have also written to Professor Rona Moss-Morris, the co-lead investigator of ACTIB, the […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - February 17, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: Some Thoughts on IBS, CFS, MUS, PACE, ACTIB and IAPT (Whew!)
By David Tuller, DrPH It might not be clear to many readers just why I’m spending time writing about irritable bowel syndrome when this series is supposed to be about the illness called myalgic encephalomyelitis (also referred to as chronic fatigue syndrome, ME/CFS, CFS/ME and other terms). The reason is that the two conditions have […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - February 13, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: My Follow-Up Letter to Professor Rona Moss-Morris
By David Tuller, DrPH Ten days ago, I sent a letter to Professor Rona Moss-Morris of King’s College London, seeking information about the licensing deal involving her web-based program of cognitive behavior therapy to treat irritable bowel syndrome. Since I have not heard back, this morning I made a second attempt to reach out to […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - February 10, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: My Letter to Professor Moss-Morris
By David Tuller, DrPH Last week I wrote about the recently announced licensing deal between Mahana Therapeutics and King’s College London. The deal involves a web-based course of cognitive behavior therapy designed to treat irritable bowel syndrome. In a major study, the reported improvements in symptoms among participants in the web-based program were modest at […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - February 3, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: David Tuller ME/CFS Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: More on the Mahana Therapeutics Deal
By David Tuller, DrPH As I wrote yesterday, Mahana Therapeutics has recently licensed from King’s College London an “innovative digital therapeutic”—a web-based program delivering a course of cognitive behavioral therapy to patients with irritable bowel syndrome. A page on the Mahana site promoting this web-delivered IBS-CBT program furthers the impression that this deal is steeped […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - January 28, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: My FOI Request to King ’ s College London; My Letter to Mahana Therapeutics
By David Tuller, DrPH Yesterday I sent a freedom-of-information request to King’s College London about the recently announced licensing deal it has with Mahana Therapeutics. The deal involves a web-based CBT program for irritable bowel syndrome, which I have written about here and here. This morning I sent a note to the e-mail address for […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - January 27, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: David Tuller ME/CFS Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: CBT and Irritable Bowel Syndrome
By David Tuller, DrPH Had things gone as planned, the PACE trial should have been able to serve as proof that so-called medically unexplained symptoms (MUS)—in this case what the investigators referred to as chronic fatigue syndrome–could be successfully treated with psychological and behavioral therapies. The Lancet published the first PACE results, which reported benefits […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - January 24, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: David Tuller ME/CFS Source Type: blogs

Inside Schizophrenia: Comorbidity with Schizophrenia
Comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional conditions co-occurring with a primary condition. In this episode, host schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers with her cohost Gabe Howard will be discussing comorbidity with schizophrenia. Comorbidity is associated with worse health outcomes, more complex clinical management and increased health care costs. Occupational therapist and host of the podcast Occupied, Brock Cook, will be joining us to discuss ways that he works with people with schizophrenia to manage multiple health issues.  Highlights from “Comorbidity with Schizophrenia” Episode [01:28] What ...
Source: World of Psychology - January 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Star Withers Tags: Antipsychotic Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia comorbid comorbid psychiatric conditions Comorbidities Comorbidity Diagnosis Of Schizophrenia Livi Source Type: blogs

Medgadget ’s Best Medical Technologies of 2019
Wrapping up this year and looking back on the particularly interesting developments in medical technology, we at Medgadget are impressed and very excited about the future. We’re lucky to cover one of the most innovative fields of research and one that improves and saves lives. Having a constant eye on what’s new in medtech, we present what we believe are the most novel, smart, and medically important technologies we encountered in this passing year. As in years past, a few trends have emerged. Opiod Overdose Treatment Opioid addiction, and accompanying overdoses, have become disturbingly common lately. A ...
Source: Medgadget - December 30, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

An excerpt from the Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly
  The original Wheat Belly book rocked the nutritional world with its revolutionary ideas. But, as time has passed, I’ve added new strategies and concepts that have expanded the overall program and taken the health, weight, and youth-preserving benefits even further. I have therefore collected all this new material into a new Revised & Expanded Edition. The new Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly is now available at all major bookstores. Here is a brief excerpt from the new foreword: Wheat Belly began as my modest effort to help people with heart disease stop relying on the revolving door of angiop...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 14, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open autoimmune blood sugar bowel flora cholesterol diabetes Dr. Davis Gliadin gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation low-carb microbiota prebiotic probiotic wheat belly Source Type: blogs

“ Wheat Belly hit like a bomb ” : Author Dana Carpender reviews the Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly
Dana Carpender, friend and author of many low-carb cookbooks, provided this review of my new Revised & Expanded Wheat Belly, below. For more of Dana’s signature wit and conversation, you can join her on her engaging Facebook page “Hold the toast press” or visit her Amazon page that lists all her wonderful low-carb cookbooks. It’s funny how things happen. Nine years ago I had already been eating a low carbohydrate diet for 16 years. During that time I had occasionally eaten low carb tortillas and low carb bread. These things were hardly a staple of my diet, but I kept ’em around for the oc...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 8, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open autoimmune joint pain wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Taking A Placebo Can Reduce Anxiety Before An Exam — Even When You Know The Pills Are Inert
By Matthew Warren The placebo effect is a curious phenomenon. A wealth of literature has shown that inert treatments can not only produce medical benefits like pain relief, but also have cognitive effects like boosting creativity and learning. And while many of those studies involve misleading people into thinking that they are receiving an effective intervention, a new study in Scientific Reports shows that this deception is not always necessary. Researchers have found that taking a placebo can reduce people’s anxiety before a test — even when they know they are taking an inactive pill.  A...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Mental health The self Source Type: blogs

Jessica: Complete relief from endometriosis and irritable bowel syndrome
The post Jessica: Complete relief from endometriosis and irritable bowel syndrome appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 24, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories endometriosis IBS irritable bowel syndrome undoctored Source Type: blogs

The Diet That Reduces Stomach Bloating
Bloating is a frequent symptom of irritable bowel syndrome and is triggered by specific types of diet. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - August 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mina Dean Tags: Stomach bloating Source Type: blogs

I ’m in pain, so why is my doctor suggesting a psychologist?
Pain makes us human. It is a bell, fine-tuned by evolution, that often rings in moments necessary for our survival. Because of pain, we can receive warnings that trigger the reflexes to escape potential danger. But what happens when that bell continues to ring? How do we respond to a signal when it interferes with the other elements that make us human? Pain that lasts longer than six months is considered chronic, and it may not go away. With chronic pain, the bell’s ongoing signal gets your nervous system wound up and increases its reactivity to incoming messages. This can be quite distressing and anxiety-provoking. ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Salim Zerriny, MD Tags: Back Pain Mind body medicine Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Leeann ’ s spectacular Wheat Belly 10-day experience
Look at the marvelous transformation in Leeann’s appearance that developed over just the 10 days of her Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox. The lateral dimensions of her face have diminished, her cheeks are less swollen and skin has lost the seborrheic redness, and around-the-eye puffiness is gone. Just look at how wonderful and big her eyes look! “I MADE IT! No turning back!! Down 3.4 pounds, less inflammation, less redness, sleeping better, more energy and just all around happier! “The best part is that my GI symptoms have completely cleared up in just these few short days. I have suffered from IBS-D [irrit...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 7, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories Detox Inflammation Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Into The Future of Gastroenterology With Digestibles And Microbiome Testing
Gluten? Lactose? Stomach pain? Digestive troubles? Way too many people suffer from gastrointestinal issues, and much less are aware of the digital technologies that can come to their aid. Did you know that digestibles could successfully replace the dreaded colonoscopy? Or have you heard about microbiome testing? What about the swarm of health apps supporting dietary restrictions? We took a deep breath and jumped into the universe of digital technologies just to bring you as much information about the future of gastroenterology as possible. Will you jump after us? IBS, colorectal cancer, and other animals Referring to...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 4, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Genomics Health Sensors & Trackers diet dieting digestibles digestion digital health gastro gastroenterologist gastroenterology gastrointestinal gluten gut Innovation lactose microbiome stomach techno Source Type: blogs

H2 Breath Detection: Game-Changer for Gastrointestinal Health
Anyone who remembers the days before finger stick blood glucose meters became available to people with diabetes will recall how awful life was for diabetics. All they had was urine dipsticks which were sloppy, yielded only crude non-quantitative feedback on blood sugars, and gave you a gauge of what blood sugars were in the recent past, not the present. It meant that dosing insulin or diabetes drugs was grotesquely imprecise and accounted for many episodes of hypoglycemic coma and acceleration of diabetic complications. It was not uncommon in those days, for instance, for a type 1 diabetic to be blind and experience kidney...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 20, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: SIBO bowel flora Inflammation probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs