How Could Genomics Bring Precision Medicine To Healthcare?
By 2025, between 100 million and 2 billion human genomes will have been sequenced, researchers said. What do medical research, companies or governments do with such an incredible amount of data? How could genomics bring DNA-based targeted treatments, personalized drugs, and individualized clinical methods, in other words, precision medicine to healthcare? Does disease categorize people? In the previous centuries, healthcare systems focused mainly on working out generalized solutions for treating ill people in as high numbers as possible. If cough syrup was good for the majority of the coughing masses and only two people ha...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 20, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Biotechnology Business Genomics Healthcare Policy Medical Professionals Policy Makers Researchers future Gene genes Genetic testing genetics Genome genome sequencing Innovation personal genomics precision medicine predict Source Type: blogs

How to Make Books Actionable?
You're reading How to Make Books Actionable?, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Have you ever read a book with lots of interesting information but failed to incorporate the message into your everyday life? Upon reading a great book, have you ever been galvanized into taking action but failed to deliver results in the end? We all, in some forms, have such memories. What if you could rekindle those memories and build your life step-by-step to the next level? If you read books on personal development and produ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: vadfulcsab Tags: featured motivation productivity tips reading best self improvement books pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Would Government Paid Leave Benefits Grow Over Time?
Some advocates and policymakers think government should be involved in providing a limited or modest paid leave benefit, just 12 weeks or less. Their support seems implicitly contingent on the expectation that a paid leave entitlement wouldn ’t grow, or wouldn’t grow much. But is there any evidence of that?If the trajectories of OECD paid leave entitlements are any indication of the path a new U.S. entitlement would take then the answer is no. All OECD countries except one increased the length of their paid leave benefits substantially over time (see chart).For example, the average length of paid maternity, parental, ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 12, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Vanessa Brown Calder Source Type: blogs

The Top Sleep Apps To Start Your Bedtime Tracking Journey
Instead of angels, dragons or unicorns, trackers may guard your dreams in the 21st century – which at least gives you a chance to gain more insight into your sleep data and actually improve your bedtime. If you want to become the master of sleep tracking, start with an app. Here, we collected the top sleep apps to choose from! With data for a better bedtime Research shows that humans spend one-third of their lives with sleeping or at least attempting to do so. If you have trouble with the snooze, there have been many traditional and non-traditional, legal and illegal methods to help: sleeping pills, booze, marijuana, inh...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 10, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Medical Professionals Patients android app apps fitness future iphone Personalized medicine sleep sleep app sleep sensor sleep tracker smartphone technology wearables Source Type: blogs

Wireless and Scanning – The Clarius Portable Ultrasound Review
Can you imagine making an ultrasound scan on your kitchen table? No need for a doctor’s appointment, no waiting time, no travel costs. With the appearance of pocket-sized and user-friendly diagnostic devices, such as the Clarius wireless portable ultrasound, it’s already possible. The Medical Futurist had the chance to test the mind-boggling technology able to revolutionize diagnostics. Here’s our great Clarius review. When everyday heroes meet science fiction turned reality On a partly cloudy September morning, The Medical Futurist team visited an ambulance crew in the Hungarian capital. We brought the experts two t...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 27, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Medical Professionals Portable Diagnostics Researchers Telemedicine & Smartphones clarius clinical digital innovation future Health Healthcare portable ultrasound review technology Source Type: blogs

The Digital Health Buzzword Radar
Data-driven haircare, blockchain-enabled long island ice tea or artificially intelligent toilet paper: the buzzwords of our time seem to be everywhere, and digital health is no exception. Sometimes it even seems to be the breeding ground of overhyped technologies and overmarketing. Here, we collected the most often used digital health buzzwords and placed them on our buzzword radar. Digital health is ripe for hype As digital health is gaining momentum, more and more companies come forward with their disruptive ideas; or at least with their claims about having built disruptive digital health solutions. For the reason that o...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 19, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Business Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Patients Policy Makers Researchers AI artificial intelligence big data blockchain buzzword deep learning digital health DTC Genetic testing genetics genomics H Source Type: blogs

Affordable Fertility Care from the Glow Fertility Program: Three Perspectives Interview
For couples dealing with infertility, the cost of fertility treatment can be significant. While numerous variables need to be considered when estimating the cost of treatments like in vitro fertilization (IVF), estimates put the price on the order of $12,000-$14,000, and sometimes even higher. This does not include the added cost of medications, which themselves range between $3,000-$5,000. While other treatment options exist at a lower cost, such as ovarian stimulation plus intrauterine insemination (IUI), these options are considered less effective. Clinical study results from the University of California published in ...
Source: Medgadget - September 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Ob/Gyn Reproductive Medicine Source Type: blogs

WiFi Lets MIT Researchers Track Objects Inside Body
Tracking the location of tissues and implants within the body is a big business, particularly when dealing with tumors. Because many localization technologies involve radiation or are limited in their accuracy and invasiveness, they’re not being used as widely as possible. Researchers at MIT have now developed a new technique, using commonly used radio waves, to perform in-body localization safely, at a distance, and with impressive accuracy. The technology, dubbed as ReMix, is based on unusual WiFi technology that was developed a few years ago to detect people’s heart rate and other biocharacteristics complete...
Source: Medgadget - August 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Radiology Source Type: blogs

Digital Technologies for Improving Hygiene in Health Facilities
150 years after Semmelweis advised fellow physicians to sanitize their hands to mitigate the effect of infections, the maintenance of hygiene is still a widespread problem in hospitals and the source of healthcare-associated infections. Now, technological solutions line up against microorganisms, bacteria, and fungi. Here are a few examples. 1 in 9 in-patients will die due to infection According to the US Center for Disease Control, studies show that on average, healthcare providers clean their hands less than half of the times they should. This significantly contributes to the spread of healthcare-associated infections (H...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 16, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Healthcare Design Medical Professionals Policy Makers clean digital digital health future HAI healthcare-associated infection hygiene Medicine robot robotics sensors technology trackers wearable Source Type: blogs

Digital Technologies for Improving Hygiene in Health Facilities
150 years after Semmelweis advised fellow physicians to sanitize their hands to mitigate the effect of infections, the maintenance of hygiene is still a widespread problem in hospitals and the source of healthcare-associated infections. Now, technological solutions line up against microorganisms, bacteria, and fungi. Here are a few examples. 1 in 9 in-patients will die due to infection According to the US Center for Disease Control, studies show that on average, healthcare providers clean their hands less than half of the times they should. This significantly contributes to the spread of healthcare-associated infections (H...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 16, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Healthcare Design Medical Professionals Policy Makers clean digital digital health future HAI healthcare-associated infection hygiene Medicine robot robotics sensors technology trackers wearable Source Type: blogs

Could Have Social Media Saved Semmelweis?
Dr. Ignác Semmelweis, a Hungarian medical doctor, or ‘the savior of mothers’ suggested that hand sanitizing could save new mothers from “childbed fever”. However, the reflex reaction of his colleagues was rejection. For years, he strove for the introduction of handwashing in hospitals in vain. Being ostracized from the medical community, he died in a psychiatric ward from internal bleeding. Members of the staff beat him up. He was born 200 years ago. What if he could have shared his ideas via social media or peer-reviewed research? Could the power of online communities have saved him? The tragic fate of a doctor g...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 14, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Social media in Healthcare history online community research research community Semmelweis Source Type: blogs

Why Are We Afraid of Androids But Love Humanoid Robots?
While the fluffy, seal-like PARO robot or the big-eyed, cartoon-figurish Pepper makes people smile, almost real-looking humanoid creatures, such as Sophia, horrify most individuals. Especially when she says she wants to destroy humanity. What’s behind the remarkably different perceptions of robots? There is a term called uncanny valley determining the aesthetics of robots, and it will have a significant role in shaping medical robotics, too. Robot aesthetics – expert level Functionality, potential users or the eventual place of use determine in many respects how a machinic creature should look. However, those are far f...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 12, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Medical Robotics Researchers aesthetics android digital health Healthcare Innovation sci-fi social companion technology uncanny valley Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 243
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 243 Readers can subscribe to FFFF RSS or subscribe to the FFFF weekly EMAIL Question 1 [real case] – A 12 year old boy is brought in by his mother with concerns about fatigue, increasing shortness of breath on exertion, easily bruising, swollen gums and ?...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark Corden Tags: Frivolous Friday Five Chang Bunker Darier sign Elizabeth Blackwell Eng Bunker leonardo da vinci macrocytosis Neymar Of the heart scurvy Siamese twins vitamin C Source Type: blogs

A big win for European honeybees
The European Union has voted to expand a 2013 ban on three neonicotinoid pesticides that harm/kill bees and other pollinators. The ban is now permanent. See: goo.gl/yWyJoL This is a major victory for science AND for common sense. I mean, even if, for some weird reason, you are NOT in favor of banning pesticides, do you really want to be eating food that has been contaminated with toxic crap that kills bees and birds? Didn’t think so… Incredibly, the EU vote was not unanimous, as it SHOULD HAVE BEEN. I read that four countries voted against it, namely, Denmark, the Czech Republic, Romania, and Hungary. Eight ot...
Source: Margaret's Corner - April 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll Bayer honeybees NEONICOTINOID PESTICIDES Takeda Source Type: blogs

Could ride-hailing platforms solve the problems of transportation in healthcare?
Patients living in rural, suburban or urban areas with poor infrastructure often don’t have the proper means to get to the doctor’s appointment on time. In extreme cases, they could even wait for emergency situations so they can call an ambulance and receive care in a hospital. In the last months, both giant ridesharing companies, Uber and Lyft announced non-emergency medical transportation services, while start-ups, such as Circulation also promise to deal with the issue. Could smartphones and networked services solve transportation in healthcare? Why is getting to the doctor such a hassle? There is a little village i...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Hospital lyft medical transportation patient ride-hailing startup uber Source Type: blogs