Global study shows diabetes and heart disease can be a deadly combination
New research has found that patients with type 2 diabetes admitted into the hospital for congestive heart failure face a one in four chance of dying within 18 months. Patients with type 2 diabetes have two to three times the heart disease risk of the general population, but the findings paint a grimmer picture of the outcome for diabetes patients with severe heart disease than was known. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Global study shows diabetes and heart disease can be a deadly combination
(University of Connecticut) New research from a global study led by UConn Health has found that patients with type 2 diabetes admitted into the hospital for congestive heart failure face a one in four chance of dying within 18 months. Patients with type 2 diabetes have two to three times the heart disease risk of the general population, but the findings paint a grimmer picture of the outcome for diabetes patients with severe heart disease than was known. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Gorgeous Photo Series Celebrates The Beauty Of Kids With Down Syndrome
A New Jersey photographer and mom of three is celebrating the beauty in kids with Down syndrome through her beautiful portraits. Back in October, Julie Willson gathered together 11 children with Down syndrome and captured their spirits in a series of photos. Their families had responded to the photographer's call for kids with Down syndrome ages 0 to 5, and some traveled as long as three or four hours to participate. Willson drew inspiration for the photo series from her sister Dina. "Dina was born in 1975 with Down syndrome and was the absolute light of our family," she told The Huffington Post, adding tha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ESC adds St. Jude’s CardioMems to guidelines for directed HF therapy
The European Society of Cardiology has added St. Jude Medical‘s (NYSE:STJ) CardioMems heart failure system to its guidelines as a “directed therapy management and monitoring tool for heart failure patients,” the company said today. The CardioMems device consists of a wireless sensor implanted in the pulmonary artery via catheter to directly measure pressure in the vessel. The device is designed to help physicians manage patients’ medication to control their heart failure before visible changes to weight or blood pressure occur. The new guidelines, published this year, support the use of pulmona...
Source: Mass Device - June 6, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular St. Jude Medical Source Type: news

10 Things You May Not Know About Anxiety Disorder
Anxiety disorders like social anxiety disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, agoraphobia, panic disorder and general anxiety are the most common forms of mental illness in the U.S. An estimated 18 percent of all American adults have an anxiety disorder, costing more than $42 billion a year.  America is unique in this regard, according to the largest ever global analysis. Some regions of the world, including the U.S. but also Western Europe, have higher rates of anxiety disorders in general. What's more, some groups within the U.S. have a higher risk of anxiety disorder diagnosis than others. Olivia Remes, lead autho...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Congestive Heart Failure (CHF)
Title: Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) Category: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 12/31/1997 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 5/19/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - May 19, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Diabetes drug pioglitazone could get personal: Neither panacea, nor peril
When I was in training, one of my beloved mentors declared, “I never use a drug until it’s been on the market for 20 years.” I was young enough then that I couldn’t fathom being a doctor for 20 years, let alone waiting two decades to use a new drug. As my career has progressed, I’ve seen many new drugs released to the market. Some of them are truly miraculous, bringing people longer, healthier, and more productive lives. Many of them have not withstood the test of time. More than a few have even been taken off the market. Even though the Food and Drug Administration diligently reviews each new...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - May 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lori Wiviott Tishler, MD, MPH Tags: Diabetes Drugs and Supplements pioglitazone thiazolidinediones Source Type: news

Chapel Hill biotech gets FDA green light to test heart disease therapy
A Chapel Hill biotech heard good news from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday. The regulatory body accepted an investigational new drug (IND) application from NanoCor Therapeutics, Inc. relating to Carfostin, an experimental cardiac gene therapy in development for the treatment of congestive heart failure (CHF). Simply accepting the application is still a long way from approving a finished drug, of course, but is seen as an important milestone for drug developers. Now, NanoCor may… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 22, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jason deBruyn Source Type: news

Chapel Hill biotech gets FDA green light to test heart disease therapy
A Chapel Hill biotech heard good news from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday. The regulatory body accepted an investigational new drug (IND) application from NanoCor Therapeutics, Inc. relating to Carfostin, an experimental cardiac gene therapy in development for the treatment of congestive heart failure (CHF). Simply accepting the application is still a long way from approving a finished drug, of course, but is seen as an important milestone for drug developers. Now, NanoCor may… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 22, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jason deBruyn Source Type: news

Queen Latifah Urges More Americans To ‘Rise Above Heart Failure’
Addressing health issues in America is something that is near and dear to Queen Latifah’s heart. For the second consecutive year, Latifah and her mom, Rita Owens, are teaming up with the American Heart Association’s “Rise Above Heart Failure” initiative to raise awareness about heart failure. As part of the initiative’s “Red Steps Challenge,” Latifah and Owens -- who was diagnosed with congestive heart failure over 10 years ago -- are calling on six million Americans to take six million “red steps” in their favorite pair of red socks in recognition of six mill...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Developing a faster-acting treatment for high-altitude affliction
Pulmonary edema is a significant risk for anyone spending time at high altitudes, and also affects people with chronic conditions including congestive heart failure. Researchers show an inhalable form of the drug Ambrisentan could offer a faster-acting treatment option for this life-threatening condition. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Better than Aspirin for Your Heart
If you’ve been diagnosed with heart disease, the chances are you’ve been told to take low-dose aspirin every day as a preventative measure against heart attack and stroke. It’s most commonly prescribed for patients with congestive heart failure. This is the inability of your heart to pump as much blood as your body needs. And this is a big worry to me, because there is very little evidence that aspirin helps. In fact, regular use of aspirin — even baby aspirin — can do you more harm than good. Common Aspirin Beliefs The idea is that aspirin thins the blood, making it easier to pump.  It i...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - April 1, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Heart Health Source Type: news

Kvedar weighs in on last month's telemonitoring study for congestive heart failure patients
Last month a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine made headlines and caused a few waves in digital health after concluding telemonitoring supported by a nurse call center intervention after discharge did not have an effect on outcomes for congest heart failure patients. This week Dr. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - March 30, 2016 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Hillary Clinton Apologizes After Shocking Praise For Nancy Reagan's 'AIDS Activism' (UPDATE)
UPDATE: Clinton tweeted the following apology just hours after making her comment. The original story appears below Clinton's tweet. Hillary Clinton’s statement on her comments about the Reagans' record on HIV and AIDS: pic.twitter.com/RtIs0zpJfk— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) March 11, 2016 PREVIOUSLY: Hillary Clinton seems to need some reminding about what happened in the early days of the AIDS epidemic.  The Democratic presidential candidate made polarizing, inaccurate -- not to mention offensive -- comments on Friday about the role that the Reagans, specifically Nancy Reagan, played in co...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Your Tongue And Tonsils Could Tell You About Your Sleeping Habits
Your dentist might be able to tell if you're having trouble sleeping.  Yes. A new study published in the Saudi Medical Journal found that the size of a person's tonsils may indicate their risk for obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which blocked upper airways cause breathing to stop and restart repeatedly during sleep. Tongue indentations, or teeth imprints on the tongue that suggest it's too big for the mouth, may also be a sign.  More than 18 million adults in the United States are affected by OSA. Since people with the condition are often suffering from interrupted and reduced sleep, it can lead to ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Medicare contractor won’t cover St. Jude Medical’s CardioMEMS heart monitor
A Medicare contractor last week said it would not cover the CardioMEMS implantable heart monitor made by St. Jude Medical (NYSE:STJ), citing the need for more clinical data on the device. Novitas, a Medicare Administrative Contractor that covers patients in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, Colorado, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and and Washington, D.C., said it would not cover the CardioMEMS device, which is designed to monitor patients for signs of heart failure. “Given the information made available in the public domain, there appears to be limitatio...
Source: Mass Device - February 22, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Patient Monitoring CardioMEMS Inc. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Novitas St. Jude Medical Source Type: news

CorMatrix wins FDA nod for Tyke neonate cardiac tissue
CorMatrix Cardiovascular said today it won FDA 510(k) clearance for its Tyke biomaterial for use in neonates and infants. The patch is designed to repair pericardial structures and as an epicardial covering or for intracardiac defects, septal defects, annulus repair, suture-line buttressing. The Tyke is derived from the company’s ECM technology platform and is composed of 2 layers of ECM, as opposed to 4 layers in their standard cardiac tissue repair patches, making it thinner for smaller repairs. “FDA clearance further validates CorMatrix ECM technology for creating world class implantable cardiac devices. Cor...
Source: Mass Device - February 9, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: 510(k) Cardiovascular Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regenerative Medicine Regulatory/Clearance CorMatrix Cardiovascular Inc. Source Type: news

Infectious diseases cause significant emergency visits, hospitalizations for older adults
(American Geriatrics Society) In a first-of-its-kind study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers calculated that infectious diseases account for 13.5 percent of emergency room (ER) visits involving older adults -- a higher percentage than ER visits for heart attacks and congestive heart failure combined. Infectious diseases are those that can be passed from person-to-person and caused by viruses, bacteria, or parasites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 1, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Grantee Directory: Rural Health Care Coordination Network Partnership Grant Program, 2015-2018
Provides contact information and brief overviews of the 8 initiatives funded under the Rural Health Care Coordination Network Partnership Grant Program in the 2015-2018 funding cycle. The initiatives focus on care coordination activities for diabetes, congestive heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. -- Federal Office of Rural Health Policy (Source: Rural publications via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Rural publications via the Rural Assistance Center - January 22, 2016 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Heart disease, related risk factors may increase risk of early death in patients with dementia
(Wiley) Diabetes, smoking, coronary heart disease, and congestive heart failure may increase the risk of premature death for hospitalized individuals and nursing home residents with dementia. Men with dementia were also more likely to experience early death compared with their female counterparts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Infections Drive Emergency Department Visits by the ElderlyInfections Drive Emergency Department Visits by the Elderly
More elderly patients visited emergency departments in the United States for infectious disease-related diagnoses in 2012 than for myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure combined. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - January 11, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Improving CHF Care With a Clinical Decision UnitImproving CHF Care With a Clinical Decision Unit
How does the development of a Clinical Decision Unit impact congestive heart failure readmission rates? Nursing Economics (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - January 5, 2016 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Nursing Journal Article Source Type: news

Healing and Curing
For the past eight years I have been conducting monthly seminars for Yale cardiology trainees entitled "Humanities in Cardiology." In these seminars we discuss issues relating to individual patient care, empathy, healing, and bioethics. As medicine becomes more technologic, impersonal, automated, data-driven and computer based, such sessions take on added importance. The seminar series begins each year with a discussion involving one's most memorable patient. Members of the group are asked to discuss the patient that has had the greatest impact on their thinking and approach to patient care. I initiate that first...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lipo Escultura: Recall - Undeclared Drug Ingredients
Use of product may increase blood pressure and/or pulse rate in some patients and may present a significant risk for patients with a history of coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, or stroke. (Source: FDA MedWatch)
Source: FDA MedWatch - December 4, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Study: Lower hospitalization rates for St. Jude Medical’s CardioMEMS heart failure monitor
St. Jude Medical (NYSE:STJ) put another brick in the wall of its defense of the CardioMEMS heart failure monitor, which was assailed earlier this year by claims that the device is not cost-effective. New data from the St. Paul, Minn.-based company’s 550-patient Champion trial, published online yesterday in The Lancet, showed lower hospitalization rates for patients treating using data from the CardioMEMS device. The trial compared patients treated using CardioMEMS with standard care for heart failure, with a primary outcome of hospital admissions. After the last patient enrolled completed 6 months of f...
Source: Mass Device - November 9, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Patient Monitoring St. Jude Medical Source Type: news

Thiazide may pose some risk for congestive heart failure patients
Thiazide, a popular diuretic for lowering high blood pressure, may not excrete salt as expected in patients with congestive heart failure and or dehydration and should be taken with caution, say researchers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Danny Strong: High school athlete battles heart failure, gets transplant
As a varsity football and lacrosse player, 17-year-old Simsbury, Connecticut native Danny Deitz was used to pushing the limits of his physical endurance. No doubt the competitive spirit was passed down to him from his father, Terry Deitz, a retired U.S. Navy pilot and two-time Survivor contestant. But last spring, Danny became concerned about a mysterious decline in his health.  Plays that were once second nature became strenuous, and he started to struggle with breathing during activity. Eventually, Danny felt weak just walking up the stairs of his high school. He was in heart failure — and about to face t...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 29, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Erin Horan Tags: Heart conditions Our patients’ stories cardiomyopathy congestive heart failure heart transplant ventricular assist device Source Type: news

Effective Health Care: A Working Model May Be Closer Than You Think
Conversations about the changing health care system in America tend to focus on tools and obstacles: technology, tele-health, universal insurance, finances, politics, medicine and advanced specialized education for nurses and home health aides, but hidden behind all the noise is a serious effort to design "real life" health care models that deliver on some "real people" needs. Key among these needs are safety, independence, aging at home and less time in emergency rooms and hospitals. There are currently about 50 million Americans over age 65 on Medicare, and two-thirds of these individuals are dealing ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Queen Latifah Discusses Helping Her Mother Battle A Major Health Issue
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zoll Acquires Kyma Medical Technologies
ZOLL Medical Corporation, an Asahi Kasei Group company that manufactures medical devices and related software solutions, today announced that it has acquired Tel Aviv, Israel-based Kyma Medical Technologies, Ltd., which develops technologies to measure early signs of congestive heart failure. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - September 21, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Disparities in Patterns of Health Care Travel Among Inpatients Diagnosed With Congestive Heart Failure, Florida, 2011
(Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease)
Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease - September 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Ventrix launches cardiac scaffolding trial
Cardiac bio-scaffold company Ventrix said it launched a trial of its VentriGel biomaterial scaffold designed to repair cardiac tissue in patients who’ve suffered a myocardial infarction. The phase 1, open-label trial is slated to enroll patients who’ve experienced their 1st myocardial infarction in the past 3 years and show signs of left ventricular dysfunction, according to the San Diego, Calif.-based company. “We have demonstrated statistically significant efficacy for VentriGel in our preclinical studies and are hopeful to see the benefits translated to patients. For people who have survived ...
Source: Mass Device - September 17, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Regenerative Medicine Ventrix Source Type: news

Alina’s story part III: Life after a heart transplant
The moment Alina Siman first opened her eyes after her heart transplant is a moment her parents will never, ever forget. “She saw her dad standing over her,” recalls her mother, Mary, “and she said, ‘Papa, Papa.’” Alina had been through quite an ordeal over that past year. Born with a congenital heart defect that was surgically corrected in infancy, Alina had been growing and developing normally until the spring of her third year. The active toddler’s seemingly strong heart began to weaken, and the situation rapidly became worse. Mary brought Alina to the Heart Center at Boston Chi...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 17, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Erin Horan Tags: All posts Heart conditions Our patients’ stories Berlin heart congestive heart failure Heart Center Heart transplant program Source Type: news

Study: St. Jude’s CardioMEMS might not be cost-effective
St. Jude Medical (NYSE:STJ)’s CardioMEMS may not be a cost-effective solution for patients with congestive heart failure, according to a study from the non-profit Institute for Clinical and Economic Review in Boston. The group analyzed the cost effectiveness of St. Jude’s device, which consists of a wireless sensor implanted in the pulmonary artery via catheter to directly measure pressure in the vessel. The device is designed to help physicians manage patients’ medication to control their heart failure before visible changes to weight or blood pressure occur. In the report, the ICER suggests th...
Source: Mass Device - September 11, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) St. Jude Medical Source Type: news

Simple test predicts obstructive sleep apnea in patients hospitalized for heart failure
(Thomas Jefferson University) Jefferson researchers showed that a simple questionnaire, evaluation and pulse-oximetry monitoring can lead to early detection of sleep apnea in patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Alina’s Story, Part II: 7 tips for long hospital stays
When four-year-old Alina Siman was waiting for a heart transplant in 2011, she had to stay at Boston Children’s Hospital for a total of five months. Alina had suffered from severe heart failure and was building strength on a Berlin Heart, a mechanical device that temporarily takes over the heart’s pumping functions. Alina received her new heart on February 28, 2012. Her mother, Mary Jane Siman, shares what she learned about staying positive, active and entertained while you’re stuck in the hospital for a long time. “These few tips were created with the help of the entire team that worked with Alina:...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 25, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Erin Horan Tags: Heart conditions Our patients’ stories congestive heart failure Heart Center Heart transplant program ventricular assist device Source Type: news

IHS: About 4M patients will use remote patient monitoring technologies by 2020
Some 4 million patients globally will remotely monitor their health conditions by 2020, up from 664,000 patients in 2014, according to a new report from IHS Technology. IHS also broke out estimates for congestive heart failure, diabetes, COPD, and mental health. Just over 324,000 patients monitored congestive heart failure in in 2014 and IHS predicts the […] (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 11, 2015 Category: Information Technology Authors: Aditi Pai Tags: Metrics Uncategorized health tracking IHS IHS Technology InMedica remote patient monitoring remote patient monitoring devices Source Type: news

Early surgery for mitral regurgitation, before clinical triggers emerge, has best outcomes
Patients with mitral regurgitation face a dilemma of whether to undergo corrective surgery early, when they might have no or few symptoms, or wait until their condition worsens. Current guidelines allow for watchful waiting until certain symptoms appear that would then “trigger” the decision to proceed with surgery. The authors argue that these guidelines are based on relatively weak class C evidence from clinical experience that is now 20 to 30 years old, and surgical methods, including mitral valve repair instead of valve replacement, have now made surgeries safer with good long-term outcomes, especially when...
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 11, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Skeletal muscle atrophy in congestive heart failure
Patients with advanced congestive heart failure lose skeletal muscle mass, but their heart muscles become enlarged to provide the body with an adequate supply of blood and oxygen. It has been known that the protein angiotensin II plays a villainous role in this process. Now, researchers have elucidated the process and identified new therapeutic targets. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 11, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Skeletal muscle atrophy in congestive heart failure
(Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) Patients with advanced congestive heart failure lose skeletal muscle mass, but their heart muscles become enlarged to provide the body with an adequate supply of blood and oxygen. It has been known that the protein angiotensin II plays a villainous role in this process. Now, Dr. Philipp Du Bois and the cardiologist PD Dr. Jens Fielitz (Experimental and Clinical Research Center, ECRC) in Berlin, have elucidated the process and identified new therapeutic targets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 11, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Advancing Health With Information Technology in the 21st Century
Conclusion In the Information Age, to advance the care of patients, new technologies including wearables, remote monitoring, text messaging, apps, and social media are being added to the 'black bag' of tools carried by physicians and other health care providers including the blood pressure cuff, thermometer and stethoscope. This technology-shaped shift in health care, if implemented with innovation and evaluation, could potentially help reduce the rate of re-hospitalizations, allow for earlier diagnosis and intervention, promote prevention, reduce costs, and improve chronic disease management in communities across our coun...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alina’s story, Part I: Looking back on a heart transplant
Heart failure in children is a sneaky condition. The symptoms can be subtle, and the situation often worsens quite quickly. That was the case for Alina Siman. Though Alina, now 8,  was born with congenital heart disease, her parents thought she had escaped the complications of her condition. Alina was born in Miami, Florida after a fetal echocardiogram diagnosed her with a coarctation of the aorta (a narrowing of the aorta) and a ventricular septal defect (a hole between the walls of the heart’s lower pumping chambers). She had surgery soon after she was born to correct her heart’s anatomy and fo...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 10, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Erin Horan Tags: Heart conditions Our patients’ stories Berlin heart congenital heart disease congestive heart failure Dr. Christina Vanderpluym Dr. Elizabeth Blume Dr. Kevin Daly Heart Center heart transplant VAD Source Type: news

Advanced Training for Home Health Aides Is Changing the Way Americans Age in Place
When Mary, a longtime home health aide, was asked to fill in for one of her colleagues recently, she found that her new client wasn't even attempting to follow the vegetable-rich diet prescribed by her physician. "I began digging deeper to find out why she wasn't eating in a healthier way," Mary recalls. "When she told me she didn't really know how to prepare vegetables in a way she liked, I offered to cook some dishes for her. She ended up loving them, and today her entire diet has changed for the better!" Mary's story reflects the expanding role of home health aides (HHAs) today. While their responsib...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trends in Observed Adult Inpatient Mortality for High-Volume Conditions, 2002-2012
Provides data on adult inpatient mortality between 2002 and 2012 for four high-volume conditions: pneumonia, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure (CHF), and stroke. Figure 4 and Table 4 provide information by location of patient residence, for rural, micropolitan, and metropolitan areas. -- Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (Source: Rural publications via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Rural publications via the Rural Assistance Center - July 28, 2015 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Bellerophon plunges on failed cardiac implant trial
Bellerophon Therapeutics (NSDQ:BLPH) said today that its bioabsorbable cardiac matrix failed to meet both the primary and secondary endpoints in a 303-patient clinical trial, sending its share price down nearly -63% today. BCM is a liquid medical device injected into the coronary artery leading to the damaged area of a heart, and is designed for use after a heart attack. It forms a gel/scaffold in the damaged portion of the heart’s left ventricle and helps support the heart wall, to prevent further damage as well as congestive heart failure, allowing the heart to heal. Once its job is done, the BCM absorbed...
Source: Mass Device - July 27, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Drug-Device Combinations Bellerophon Therapeutics Source Type: news

Doctors Say Drinking Eight Glasses Of Water Per Day Is Unnecessary
BOSTON (CBS) — You may often hear you should drink at least eight glasses of water a day to stay hydrated and healthy, but as Dr. Mallika Marshall reports, you can probably flush that number down the toilet. Tom Schalk drinks a lot of water. “I’m trying to hydrate before we get to the gym, then at the gym, then after the gym,” he explains. Tom now guzzles 6 to 8 bottles a day. “I feel like I’m doing something good for myself,” he adds. So how much does the body need? A new article published in the Harvard Health Letter recommends 30 to 50 ounces a day. Fluids carry nutrients to you...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: kcarroll94 Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dr. Mallika Marshall Dr. Sharmeela Saha Harvard Health Letter Martha Hileire Tom Schalk University Hospitals Case Medical Center Source Type: news

Hospital readmissions for sepsis are highly common, extremely costly
UCLA Health Sciences Dr. Dong Chang The Affordable Care Act created several national initiatives aimed at reducing hospital readmission rates for heart attacks, congestive heart failure and other common high-risk conditions. But there is still no national program intended to address sepsis, a potentially life-threatening illness caused by infection. Now, a new UCLA study found that sepsis accounts for roughly the same percentage of hospital readmissions in California as heart attacks and congestive heart failure — and that it costs the health care system more than both of them combined. The research, conducted by th...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 8, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA doctors use 3-D printed model to guide tricky heart valve replacement
​​Last summer, after a long career as a successful entrepreneur and a brief retirement, Richard Whitaker was helping to start another new company. Unfortunately, a serious health concern caused a couple of interruptions in his work on the new venture. One of Whitaker’s heart valves wasn’t working properly, which caused congestive heart failure and led to two hospitalizations within several months.  Whitaker, now 66, needed surgery to replace the valve, which regulates the blood being pumped from the heart to the lungs. But previous surgeries and the unique anatomy of his heart would have made conventio...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 1, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Water: An Essential Cornerstone of Wellness
After a long winter, many people decide to take up jogging, running, or playing outdoor sports (especially during the spring and late summer months). A few days or weeks in, they will often schedule an appointment with their doctors because the exercise triggers headaches, feeling worn down, or problems with focus. People also report similar symptoms after beginning certain medications to treat high blood pressure or allergies. The surprising cause of these symptoms in both groups is the same -- it is dehydration. Some of the Reasons for Dehydration Even though people know they need to drink plenty of water per day,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Comorbid conditions associated with worse lung cancer survival
(American Association for Cancer Research) Lung cancer patients with comorbid conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, or congestive heart failure had a higher risk of death than lung cancer patients without comorbid conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news