A promising new treatment for infants with Noonan syndrome
(University of Montreal) Infants less than six months old with Noonan Syndrome, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure normally have a poor prognosis, with a one-year survival rate of 34%. In the new study, doctors used Trametinib to try to treat NS in two patients.They observed dramatic improvement of clinical and cardiac status in the patients only three months after treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Massachusetts Medical Device Development Center announces $200K Challenge winners
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) Entrepreneurs developing new technologies to treat blood clots, congestive heart failure, incontinence and more were the big winners at the Massachusetts Medical Device Development Center $200,000 Challenge, an annual pitch competition that showcases cutting-edge innovations in the medical-device and biotech fields. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Machines Treating Patients? It ’s Already Happening
Rayfield Byrd knows when it’s time to wake up every morning. The 68-year-old Oakland, Cal., resident hears a voice from the living room offering a cheery good morning. Except Byrd lives alone. A little after 8 a.m. each day, a small yellow robot named Mabu asks Byrd how he’s doing. Byrd has Type 2 diabetes and congestive heart failure, and about three years ago, he had surgery to implant a microvalve in his heart to keep his blood flowing properly. To stay healthy, he takes four medications a day and needs to exercise regularly. To make sure his heart is still pumping effectively, his doctor needs to stay on to...
Source: TIME: Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence Life Reinvented medicine Source Type: news

Bet Your Toilet Seat Can & #039;t Do This!
Every now and then we come across a technology that just begs the question: How on Earth did they think of that? Case in point, a toilet seat designed to detect heart failure by measuring a patient's biometrics during "natural" processes.  A team of researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) are responsible for the idea, which is intended to lower hospital readmission rates by alerting doctors of a patient's deteriorating cardiovascular condition before the patients even realize they have symptoms. The idea is for hospitals to buy the seats and issue them to heart failure patie...
Source: MDDI - March 20, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Cardiovascular Source Type: news

Toilet seat that detects congestive heart failure getting ready to begin commercialization
(Rochester Institute of Technology) A toilet-seat based cardiovascular monitoring system created by a team of Rochester Institute of Technology researchers aims to lower the hospital readmission rates of patients with congestive heart failure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Your Blood Donation Can Help Save Lives
Every day, volunteer blood and platelet donors across the country are needed to help save lives. Eligible individuals can feel good knowing that by donating through the Red Cross, they ... The post... {This is a content summary only. Click the blog post title to continue reading this post, share your comments, browse the blog and more!} (Source: Red Cross Chat)
Source: Red Cross Chat - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: American Red Cross Tags: Blood blood donation congestive heart failure heart pump heart transplant LVAD platelets Vikas Mahajan Source Type: news

Philips touts adaptive servo ventilation sleep apnea study data
Royal Philips (NYSE:PHG) yesterday released results from a study exploring the use of adaptive servo ventilation in treating patients with complex sleep apnea. Results from the study were published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the Amsterdam-based company said. Investigators in the study compared the performance of four different ASV devices, including Philips’ DreamStation BiPap autoSV, as well as an ASV device originally associated with greater mortality during the SERVE-HF trial published in 2015, the company said. “The pursuit for scientific understanding of various...
Source: Mass Device - March 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Respiratory Royal Philips Source Type: news

EMS Medical Directors Chart the Future of EMS at Annual Gathering of Eagles
The Metropolitan Medical Directors Coalition (AKA “Eagles”) 21st Annual Retreat (AKA “Eagle Creek”) was held Wednesday and Thursday, February 27 and 28, at the Dallas Sheraton Hotel under the leadership of Paul Pepe, MD. The closed, invitation-only retreat is attended by 70 medical directors from the most-populated metropolitan EMS systems as well as 18 EMS fellows—33% of the nation’s current EMS fellows. This group oversees EMS for a combined population of over 114 million people in the United States and abroad, with representatives from Canada; Germany; New Zealand; Italy; Amsterdam, T...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 28, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT P Tags: Top Story News Exclusive Articles Patient Care Administration and Leadership Operations Source Type: news

EMS Medical Directors Chart the Future of EMS at Annual Gathering of Eagles
The Metropolitan Medical Directors Coalition (AKA “Eagles”) 21st Annual Retreat (AKA “Eagle Creek”) was held Wednesday and Thursday, February 27 and 28, at the Dallas Sheraton Hotel under the leadership of Paul Pepe, MD. The closed, invitation-only retreat is attended by 70 medical directors from the most-populated metropolitan EMS systems as well as 18 EMS fellows—33% of the nation’s current EMS fellows. This group oversees EMS for a combined population of over 114 million people in the United States and abroad, with representatives from Canada; Germany; New Zealand; Italy; Amsterdam, T...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - February 28, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT P Tags: Top Story News Exclusive Articles Patient Care Administration and Leadership Operations Source Type: news

EMS Medical Directors Chart the Future of EMS at Annual Gathering of Eagles
The Metropolitan Medical Directors Coalition (AKA “Eagles”) 21st Annual Retreat (AKA “Eagle Creek”) was held Wednesday and Thursday, February 27 and 28, at the Dallas Sheraton Hotel under the leadership of Paul Pepe, MD. The closed, invitation-only retreat is attended by 70 medical directors from the most-populated metropolitan EMS systems as well as 18 EMS fellows—33% of the nation’s current EMS fellows. This group oversees EMS for a combined population of over 114 million people in the United States and abroad, with representatives from Canada; Germany; New Zealand; Italy; Amsterdam, T...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 28, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT P Tags: Top Story News Exclusive Articles Patient Care Administration and Leadership Operations Source Type: news

EMS Medical Directors Chart the Future of EMS at Annual Gathering of Eagles
The Metropolitan Medical Directors Coalition (AKA “Eagles”) 21st Annual Retreat (AKA “Eagle Creek”) was held Wednesday and Thursday, February 27 and 28, at the Dallas Sheraton Hotel under the leadership of Paul Pepe, MD. The closed, invitation-only retreat is attended by 70 medical directors from the most-populated metropolitan EMS systems as well as 18 EMS fellows—33% of the nation’s current EMS fellows. This group oversees EMS for a combined population of over 114 million people in the United States and abroad, with representatives from Canada; Germany; New Zealand; Italy; Amsterdam, T...
Source: JEMS Operations - February 28, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT P Tags: Top Story News Exclusive Articles Patient Care Administration and Leadership Operations Source Type: news

Astaxanthin found to protect the heart in diabetics, researchers confirm
(Natural News) Most diabetes-related mortality incidences can be attributed to its complications. One of the most serious consequences caused by this disease is a heart condition called diabetic cardiomyopathy. Left untreated, diabetic cardiomyopathy can progress into congestive heart failure, which poses a severe threat to the patient’s life. Fortunately, researchers from The First Affiliated Hospital Of Nanjing Medical University and The... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Food Could Be the Best Medicine of All
When Tom Shicowich’s toe started feeling numb in 2010, he brushed it off as a temporary ache. At the time, he didn’t have health insurance, so he put off going to the doctor. The toe became infected, and he got so sick that he stayed in bed for two days with what he assumed was the flu. When he finally saw a doctor, the physician immediately sent Shicowich to the emergency room. Several days later, surgeons amputated his toe, and he ended up spending a month in the hospital to recover. Shicowich lost his toe because of complications of Type 2 diabetes as he struggled to keep his blood sugar under control. He wa...
Source: TIME: Health - February 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized health Nutrition Source Type: news

Chris Pratt Is Doing the Daniel Fast Diet. But Is It Healthy?
The Daniel Fast has been around a long time — since the Old Testament, in fact. But actor Chris Pratt gave it new popularity recently by posting an Instagram story about adopting it as his latest diet. Pratt described the plan as “21 days of prayer and fasting.” But what does the Daniel Fast actually entail — and is it healthy? Here’s what you need to know. What is the Daniel Fast? The Daniel Fast is a religiously rooted, short-term eating plan drawn from the Book of Daniel, which appears in the Old Testament. In the story, Daniel decides to avoid the rich, indulgent foods that surround him an...
Source: TIME: Health - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Opioids Are In the Spotlight. But Meth Hospitalizations Are Surging
The number of people hospitalized because of amphetamine use is skyrocketing in the United States, but the resurgence of the drug largely has been overshadowed by the nation’s intense focus on opioids. Amphetamine-related hospitalizations jumped by about 245% from 2008 to 2015, according to a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. That dwarfs the rise in hospitalizations from other drugs, such as opioids, which were up by about 46%. The most significant increases were in Western states. The surge in hospitalizations and deaths due to amphetamines “is just totally off the radar,” ...
Source: TIME: Health - November 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Anna Gorman / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Managing the Toxic Chemical Release that Occurs During a Crush Injury
Conclusion Remember, crush injuries are a different form of trauma that require a very different mindset and approach to patient care. Local physiologic deterioration can begin very quickly, but systemic effects aren’t seen until the external pressure on the extremity or body part is released. The presentation of crush injuries can also be very clandestine, as in automobile accidents, due to local or central sensory neurological interruption and damage. Therefore, it’s essential to insist upon earliest possible access to the patient to assess the possible/probable extent of any crush injury and prepare/monitor ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - October 23, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Andrew Parrish, MD, EMT-P Tags: Trauma Exclusive Articles Source Type: news

CHF in Pregnancy Up for Cancer Survivors With Cardiac Toxicity
Incidence of congestive heart failure 31 percent among women with a history of cardiotoxicity (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - October 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Gynecology, Oncology, Pharmacy, Radiology, Journal, Source Type: news

CHF in Pregnancy Up for Cancer Survivors With Cardiac Toxicity
TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 -- The incidence of congestive heart failure (CHF) during pregnancy is 31 percent among women with a history of cardiotoxicity associated with cancer treatment, according to a study published in the Oct. 23 issue of the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Cancer survivors at risk for heart failure during, after pregnancy
(American College of Cardiology) Young women previously treated for cancer with chemotherapy or radiation therapy with a prior history of cardiotoxicity are more likely to develop clinical congestive heart failure (CHF) during and after pregnancy, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Heart Failure | Medscape Heart Failure | Medscape
Review in-depth clinical information, latest medical news, and guidelines on heart failure. Understand the strategies for managing congestive heart failure and heart disease, including cardiac failure diagnosis and management. (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Resource Center Source Type: news

Estonia: Health System Review.
Authors: Habicht T, Reinap M, Kasekamp K, Sikkut R, Aaben L, van Ginneken E Abstract This analysis of the Estonian health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. In 2017, the Estonian government took the historic step of expanding the revenue base of the health system, which has been a longstanding challenge. However, in terms of percentage of GDP it remains a small increase and long-term financial sustainability could still pose a problem. That said, if these additional funds are invested wisely, they ...
Source: Health systems in transition - October 3, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: Health Syst Transit Source Type: news

12 Congestive Heart Failure Symptoms, Stages, Causes, and Life Expectancy
Title: 12 Congestive Heart Failure Symptoms, Stages, Causes, and Life ExpectancyCategory: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 12/31/1997 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/28/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - September 28, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

What Causes Hyperkalemia?
Discussion Potassium (K+) is an alkali metal (Group 1 of periodic table with Hydrogen, Lithium and Sodium) with an anatomic number of 19. Its chemical symbol K, comes from the medieval Latin, kalium which means potash (mainly potassium carbonate or potassium hydroxide), the substance it was first isolated from. Potassium is an important cation and it mainly resides in the intracellular fluid with only a small amount in the extracellular fluid. Potassium regulates cell volume, pH and enzyme functions. Hyperkalemia is defined as a potassium level> 5.5 mEq/L in children and> 6.0 mEq/L in newborns. Hyperkalemia incre...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 24, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Health Care Heroes award winner: CHF Pathway/Washington Health System
CHF Pathway/Washington Health System is a 2018 Health Care Heroes award winner in the community outreach - organization category. Here's their story: Washington Health System has developed a program that follows patients with congestive heart failure after they’ve left the hospital. CHF Pathway is designed to address the problem of people not following doctors orders by creating long-term relationships with patients on an ongoing basis. “ We already had good standardized methods to treat patients… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - September 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Richard Cerilli Source Type: news

Health Care Heroes award winner: CHF Pathway/Washington Health System
CHF Pathway/Washington Health System is a 2018 Health Care Heroes award winner in the community outreach - organization category. Here's their story: Washington Health System has developed a program that follows patients with congestive heart failure after they’ve left the hospital. CHF Pathway is designed to address the problem of people not following doctors orders by creating long-term relationships with patients on an ongoing basis. “ We already had good standardized methods to treat patients… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 8, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Richard Cerilli Source Type: news

Ask Survival Rate for Congestive Heart Failure
What Is the Survival Rate for Congestive Heart Failure? (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - August 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Vascular Graft Solutions ’ aneurysm graft used in hemodialysis patients
  Vascular Graft Solutions’ Frame external support Vascular Graft Solutions has reported the first clinical use of its Frame external support technology in high-flow arteriovenous (AV) fistulas. The first five cases were performed by Dr. Vladimir Matoussevitch from Cologne University Hospital in Germany. The braided cobalt chrome, kink-resistant external support was designed for autologous vein grafts in bypass or reconstruction of peripheral arterial blood vessels. Mattoussevitch used them to prevent high-flow AV fistula and aneurysmal enlargement complications, which are common in patients undergoing...
Source: Mass Device - August 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Vascular vasculargraftsolutions Source Type: news

Looking Past Dementia Reveals Hidden Life Threats
Conclusion Acute delirium is commonly underdiagnosed, and can be masked by chronic alterations in cognition and mentation. Delirium has many causes, and can be assessed using the acronym DELIRIUM. The most common presentations suggesting delirium over dementia are short-term memory loss, rapid fluctuation in condition, acute alteration, and a condition present that may be responsible for delirium. Management includes searching for causes of acute alteration in mental status, negating environmental factors of delirium, and—only when necessary—reducing the patient’s threat to themselves or providers by usin...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - August 13, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joseph K. Mesches, NRP, FP-C Tags: Exclusive Articles Patient Care Source Type: news

Epigenetic reprogramming of human hearts found in congestive heart failure
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Congestive heart failure is a terminal disease that affects nearly 6 million Americans. Yet its management is limited to symptomatic treatments because the causal mechanisms of congestive heart failure are not known. Researchers have now described an underlying mechanism that reprograms the hearts of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, a process that differs from patients with other forms of heart failure. This points the way toward future personalized care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doxorubicin disrupts the immune system to cause heart toxicity
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Doxorubicin is a chemotherapy drug used in ovarian, bladder, lung, thyroid and stomach cancers, but it carries a harmful side effect. The drug causes a dose-dependent heart toxicity that can lead to congestive heart failure. Researchers have found an important contributor to that heart pathology -- disruption of the metabolism that controls immune responses in the spleen and heart. This dysregulated immunometabolism impairs resolution of inflammation, and chronic, non-resolving inflammation leads to advanced heart failure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Adhesive respiratory monitor detects breathing problems early
[Image from Exspiron]Children can be at risk for compromised breathing after surgery or from conditions like asthma, congestive heart failure or sleep apnea. Opioid therapy and sedation for medical procedures can also depress breathing. Unless a child is sick enough to have a breathing tube, respiratory problems can be difficult to detect early. Yet early detection can mean the difference between life and death. “There is currently no real-time objective measure,” says Viviane Nasr, MD, an anesthesiologist with Boston Children’s Hospital’s Division of Cardiac Anesthesia. “Instead, respiratory ...
Source: Mass Device - July 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog Vector Blog Source Type: news

Teach Your Children Well — About Substance Abuse
“Teach your children well,” a Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young classic encourages. Children are impressionable, like sponges that soak up whatever liquid they are immersed in. Some parents say they’d rather have their teens drink at home than elsewhere, where they’re in danger of driving impaired. Many parents minimize or dismiss the dangers, rationalizing that because they survived their youth, particularly if they grew up in the more freewheeling 1960s and ’70s, their children will survive as well. But this attitude has the opposite effect of the intended one. “Parental attitudes favo...
Source: Psych Central - July 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Parenting Substance Abuse Source Type: news

Heart monitor startup Bitome is first recipient of new Bayer, MassBio fellowship
A two-year-old startup developing an at-home solution for people in congestive heart failure has found a home and mentorship within Bayer's Cambridge offices through a new MassBio fellowship. Boston-based Bitome is the first company to be selected for the MassConnect fellowship at the German drug giant's local facility. The med-tech start-up — which is still in the seed funding stage — will receive assistance clinical development, industry regulations, financing and more during the six-month-long… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - July 19, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

Grain-free food linked to heart disease in dogs
Dogs that eat grain-free diets may be more prone to develop a canine cardiovascular disease that has historically been seen in just a few breeds. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine and a group of veterinary diagnostic laboratories are investigating the potential link between canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and pet foods containing seeds or potatoes as main ingredients.  Breeds genetically predispose d to DCM, which often results in congestive heart failure,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - July 16, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Afib Patch Test; Heart Failure and Genetics: It's PodMed Double T! (with audio)
(MedPage Today) -- This week's topics include a patch to diagnose atrial fibrillation, USPSTF recommendations on nontraditional risk factors for heart disease, the role of genetics in congestive heart failure, and multivitamins and heart disease. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - July 14, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Heart Disease in Dogs May be Tied to Certain Foods
Large dogs such as Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Doberman Pinschers have a genetic risk for canine DCM, a disease of the heart muscle that often leads to congestive heart failure. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Targeting 'microtubules' could prevent heart failure
A study from the Perelman School of Medicine investigates an interesting new target for the prevention of congestive heart failure: microtubules. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Congestive Heart Failure After Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Congestive Heart Failure After Atrial Fibrillation Ablation
How would you manage CHF in this patient now 14 months after AF ablation? Take this quiz created by physicians from ACC.ACC.org (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Interactive Quiz Source Type: news

RenalGuard touts ADHF treatment feasibility study data
RenalGuard Solutions late last week released results from a feasibility study of its RenalGuard-guided diuretic therapy intended to improve fluid management in patients with acute decompensated heart failure and alleviate related symptoms. Results from the study were presented at the European Society of Cardiology’s Heart Failure 2018 conference in Vienna, the Milford, Mass.-based company said. The company said its RenalGuard-guided diuretic therapy is intended to allow for the use of an increased dose of diuretics without increasing the risk of diuretic resistant to allow for the safe and effective removal of excess...
Source: Mass Device - May 29, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials RenalGuard Solutions Source Type: news

Food as medicine pilot program under way
California is the first state to pilot a program to explore whether providing food tailored to the specific nutritional needs of chronic disease sufferers can reduce health care costs and reverse some conditions.   Researchers from the University of California/San Francisco and Stanford University are conducting a three-year study to see if providing healthy meals to 1,000 Medi-Cal patients with congestive heart failure or Type 2 diabetes reduces hospital readmission rates and referrals to long-term… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 14, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Food as medicine pilot program under way
California is the first state to pilot a program to explore whether providing food tailored to the specific nutritional needs of chronic disease sufferers can reduce health care costs and reverse some conditions.   Researchers from the University of California/San Francisco and Stanford University are conducting a three-year study to see if providing healthy meals to 1,000 Medi-Cal patients with congestive heart failure or Type 2 diabetes reduces hospital readmission rates and referrals to long-term… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 14, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Barbara Bush Leaves A Legacy: Champion For End-Of-Life Care
Before her passing earlier this week, former First Lady Barbara Bush announced that she would be spending her final days at home with her family utilizing “comfort care” in lieu of continued medical treatment for her congestive heart failure and COPD. She chose quality of life over quantity of life. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 20, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Nicole Fisher, Contributor Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How long can a person live with congestive heart failure?
Congestive heart failure is a progressive disease that causes the heart to weaken, making it difficult to pump blood around the body. In this article, we look at the symptoms, stages, and life expectancy of congestive heart failure. We also look at treatment options, including lifestyle changes and surgery. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Former First Lady Barbara Bush Dies
Former first lady Barbara Bush, who had COPD and congestive heart failure, died at the age of 92. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ResMed is disrupting connected health: Here ’ s how
The AirMini, the smallest PAP available, was released by ResMed in 2017. [Image courtesy of ResMed] Here’s how a respiratory firm took control of the connected health and the medtech digital revolution. When you think powerful digital connected devices, the first thing to pop into your head probably isn’t a CPAP. Continuous positive airway pressure has been shown in numerous studies to be effective in improving sleep apnea and preventing a host of co-morbidities such as obesity, congestive heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. But the buy-in from patients is notoriously lacking. Respiratory ...
Source: Mass Device - April 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Heather Thompson Tags: Big Data Business/Financial News mHealth (Mobile Health) News Well Patient Monitoring connected medical devices Digital Health ResMed Inc. Source Type: news

A Modern Approach to Basic Airway Management
A modern approach to the essentials of ventilation & oxygenation Administering oxygen via nasal cannula while treating a patient with CPAP increases the fraction of inspired oxygen and doesn’t typically interfere with the mask seal. Photos courtesy Andrew Merelman You arrive on scene and find a 68-year-old man is lying on the couch with difficulty breathing. He’s obese and obtunded, with severe respiratory distress. His wife tells you he has a history of congestive heart failure. He appears pale and diaphoretic, with snoring, slow, shallow breaths and his initial oxygen saturation is 72%. What are the m...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - April 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Andrew Merelman, BS, NRP, FP-C Tags: Airway & Respiratory Patient Care Source Type: news

Congestive heart failure device dev Alleviant Medical raises $1m
Alleviant Medical has raised $1.1 million in a new round of debt and options financing, according to an SEC filing posted this week. Money in the round came from 15 unnamed sources, according to the SEC filing, with the first sale recorded on December 19 last year. The company is looking to raise an additional $434,000 in the round to bring the total raised to $1.5 million, according to an SEC filing. Alleviant Medical has not yet stated how it plans to spend funds raised in the round. Alleviant Medical is developing a minimally invasive device designed to treat congestive heart failure. The company’s device is desig...
Source: Mass Device - March 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular alleviantmedical Source Type: news

UR Medicine Leads U.S. in Minimally Invasive Surgery for Newest LVAD Heart Pump
UR Medicine cardiac surgeons recently introduced a minimally invasive approach to implanting the newest heart pump available for people with congestive heart failure. This is believed to be the first in the nation, and potentially a game-changer for patients. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - March 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

Insurers Are Getting Into Health Care, But Is It Good for You?
In the not-too-distant future, your health insurance, your prescription drugs and some of your treatment may come from the same company. Insurers are dropping billions of dollars on acquisitions and expansions in order to get more involved in customer health. They say this push can help cut costs and improve care, in part by keeping the sickest patients healthy and out of expensive hospitals. That’s a huge potential benefit for employers and other customers stressed by rising costs. But is this good for your health? That question worries some health care insiders who wonder if the patient’s best interest &mdash...
Source: TIME: Health - March 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tom Murphy / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH Healthcare healthytime Source Type: news