How not go get cancer
The Global Burden of Disease project is a decades long international collaboration, based at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, but involving researchers around the world. It was originally funded by the World Bank, and now receives its principal support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. GBD (not to be confused with golden brown and delicious) essentially tries to quantify the prevalence of diseases, and injuries around the world; the prevalence of associated disability; causes of death; and risk factors. They use a lot of complicated methods. If you ' re really ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - August 19, 2022 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Matthew ’s health care tidbits: The Stupidity Vaccine
Each week I’ve been adding a brief tidbits section to the THCB Reader, our weekly newsletter that summarizes the best of THCB that week (Sign up here!). Then I had the brainwave to add them to the blog. They’re short and usually not too sweet! –Matthew Holt For my health care tidbits this week, I think we need a new vaccine. We need one that prevents stupidity.Look I get that some people don’t think the flu vaccine is effective and don’t think the effects are too bad, so they don’t get one every year. Many people don’t get a vaccine for shingles. But as someone who had shingles long before the recommended ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 5, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Health Policy Matthew Holt vaccines Source Type: blogs

Will This Novel Virus Revive Older Ones?
Jeffrey A. SingerAs I recently wrotehere, and spoke abouthere, bans on elective surgery invoked by governors across the country in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have caused many people to suffer and even possibly face fatal consequences due to delays in necessary medical care. But there are other reasons why the public health emergency has the potential to generate secondary public health crises.In some cases people are avoiding doctors ’ offices and emergency rooms because they worry about handling theexpense at a time they have seen their income, and perhaps their savings, vanish during the current econom...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 9, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

NLM ’s Groundbreaking Work to Prevent Cervical Cancer
Cervical cancer is highly preventable—but only if you live in a place where there’s access to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and routine gynecological screening. Recent advances in vaccines protecting against HPV infection, which is the primary cause of the cancer, and improved cervical screening tests promise a future with a significantly reduced prevalence of… (Source: NLM In Focus)
Source: NLM In Focus - February 13, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Posted by NLM in Focus Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Vaccines for women: Before conception, during pregnancy, and after a birth
The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before conception? The ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ilona T. Goldfarb, MD, MPH Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Sexually transmitted infections are on the rise: Should you worry?
In 2018, the number of bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) reported in the United States reached an all-time high. This is worrisome for many reasons. Having an STI can raise risks for HIV, infertility, pregnancy complications, and infant death. Fortunately, all of these outcomes can be avoided if people receive appropriate treatment. What are STIs? STIs are illnesses caused by microorganisms passed between people during sex. An STI can affect anyone who is exposed to it. Syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia are the most common bacterial infections. Trichomoniasis, a protozoan infection, is also diagnosed freque...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eric A. Meyerowitz, MD Tags: Adolescent health HIV Men's Health Relationships Sexual Conditions Women's Health Source Type: blogs

HPV and cancer: The underappreciated connection
Did you know that a viral infection can lead to a number of different types of cancer? If that comes as a surprise to you, you’re not alone. In fact, according to a new study, many people have no idea that a common viral infection called human papilloma virus (HPV) can cause cancer of the genitals, anus, mouth, and throat, as well as cervical cancer. Viral infections and cancer The connection between certain viral infections and cancer has been recognized for many years. Some of the most well-established examples include hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and human papillomavirus (HPV). One thing these viru...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Adolescent health Cancer Infectious diseases Men's Health Sexual Conditions Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs

HPV vaccine: A vaccine that works, and one all children should get
Human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Most of the time, the body clears it without problems. But when it doesn’t, it can lead to cancer. HPV is the leading cause of cervical cancer, and it can also lead to cancers of the vagina, vulva, penis, anus, and mouth. Every year, there are more than 40,000 cases of cancer caused by HPV. The HPV vaccine can prevent most of them. Research shows the HPV vaccine is effective A study published in the journal Pediatrics underlined just how effective the vaccine is. Researchers studied women ages 13 to 26 between 2006 and 2017, looking at thei...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Men's Health Parenting Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs

If we don ’t pay now to vaccinate our children, they will pay later
The HPV vaccine saves lives.  It does so by reducing a person’s chance of being infected by the human papilloma virus, a virus that causes a whole range of cancers including, most importantly, cervical cancer.  Vaccinate your teenage daughter against HPV, and you will increase the chance she will live to old age. Simple as that. […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 27, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/peter-ubel" rel="tag" > Peter Ubel, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Meds Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

What we can learn from Marcia Cross about HPV vaccination
Recently, Desperate Housewives star Marcia Cross made headlines by discussing her diagnosis of anal cancer and her husband ’s diagnosis of throat cancer, revealing that both had been related to the human papillomavirus, or HPV. The move was brave, as the actress broke free from the stigma related to anal cancer and sexually transmitted diseases. More […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 14, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/brian-kim" rel="tag" > Brian Kim, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Gastroenterology Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

The Vaccination that Never Should Have Been Approved
The Gardasil vaccination should never have been approved by the FDA. Several fraudulent studies found serious health damage in the groups studied. VacTruth.com (Source: vactruth.com)
Source: vactruth.com - June 7, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Michelle Goldstein Tags: Ingredients Michelle Goldstein Source Type: blogs

No, the HPV vaccine isn ’t optional
A lot of parents ask me, about the HPV vaccine,“Isn’t that the optional one?” Well, let me walk you through why my answer to that question is a hard“no.” Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus that causes warts and several types of cancer. There are over 200 different  strains of HPV, some of which […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 19, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/chad-hayes" rel="tag" > Chad Hayes, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Meds Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

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(see:Startup uses phone, light and AI to detect cervical cancer)Israeli startup MobileODT has created the Eva System, which uses an Automated Visual Evaluation (AVE) algorithm that it says can detect cervical cancer by simply examining an image of the cervix (Courtesy) Israeli startup MobileODT has created the Eva System, which uses an Automated Visual Evaluation (AVE) algorithm that it says can detect cervical cancer by simply examining an image of the cervix (Courtesy) Israeli start-up MobileODT says it can detect cervical cancer more accurately and inexpensively than the standard colposcopy method used today, by creatin...
Source: Lab Soft News - April 17, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Source Type: blogs

Insurers Are Not Paying Enough For HPV Vaccines – And Our Kids Are Paying The Price
The HPV vaccine saves lives. It does so by reducing a person’s chance of being infected by the human papilloma virus, a virus that causes a whole range of cancers including, most importantly, cervical cancer. Vaccinate your teenage daughter against … Continue reading → The post Insurers Are Not Paying Enough For HPV Vaccines – And Our Kids Are Paying The Price appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care Health & Well-being health policy Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Everyone Has a Part to Play in Ending Vaccine Hesitancy
Felicia D. Goodrum Sterling Heidi L. Pottinger By FELICIA D. GOODRUM STERLING, PhD and HEIDI L. POTTINGER, DrPH, MPH, MA The measles outbreak in Washington state this week has brought new attention to the anti-vaccine movement.  In fact, the World Health Organization recently identified “vaccine hesitancy” as one of top threats to global health. In the US, the number of unvaccinated children has quadrupled since 2001, enabling the resurgence of infectious diseases long-since controlled.  In fact, the WHO claims a staggering 1.5 million deaths could be prevented worldwide by improved vaccination rates. Amidst the medi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Patients Felicia Goodrum Sterling Global Health Heidi L. Pottinger public health The OpEd Project vaccines Source Type: blogs