COVID-19 morbidity and mortality in people with rheumatic diseases

(European Alliance of Associations for Rheumatology) Population-based data shared at the EULAR 2021 congress -- The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus (SARS-CoV-2) is of particular concern for people with inflammatory diseases, and there are concerns that these people may be at higher risk and have poorer outcomes. However, at present the implications remain poorly understood. Population-based data from Spain show individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had an increased risk of COVID-19 diagnosis and hospitalization compared to the general population. Similarly, data from the ARTIS database in Sweden show risks of severe COVID-19 were increased among people with inflammatory joint diseases.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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