The effect of exercise on carbohydrate preference in female rats.

This study is the first of its kind to demonstrate the influence of exercise on, taste preference for complex and simple carbohydrates with this context conditioning paradigm. PMID: 24406468 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Brain Research Bulletin - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Res Bull Source Type: research

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This popular science article from the AARP is representative of the sort of outsider's view of the longevity industry that is presently dominant. On the one hand, it is good that the media and advocacy organizations such as AARP are finally talking seriously about treating aging as a medical condition. On the other hand, the author looks at two of the most popular areas of development, mTOR inhibitors and senolytics, in a way that makes them seem more or less equivalent, and then further adds diet and exercise as another equivalent strategy. This will be continuing issue, I fear. People, as a rule, don't think about size o...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
There hasn’t been much good news about Alzheimer’s lately, between the March announcement by Biogen and Esai that a promising trial of a potential drug treatment failed, and the July decision by Novartis and Amgen to stop their study of another class of therapies for the neurodegenerative disease. But in a pair of studies presented at the annual Alzheimer’s Association International Conference on July 14, researchers reported encouraging results from studies of non-drug approaches. In one, scientists led by Dr. Klodian Dhana at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago followed nearly 2,500 people for alm...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Brain embargoed study Source Type: news
New Duke University suggests that a long-term calorie restrictive diet may protect heart and metabolic health, even if you're a healthy weight, by reducing your risk of chronic inflammation.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Let’s first discuss what the goals of a diet should be when you have type 2 diabetes. After all, if this disease that now affects tens of millions of Americans is simply allowed to progress, it means a future of heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, peripheral neuropathy, amputations, failing eyesight, gastroparesis, and an average of eight years taken from your lifespan. So let’s agree that a diet for type 2 diabetes should: Reverse insulin resistance—i.e., the process that leads to developing diabetes in the first place. Reduce blood sugar and HbA1c (the long-term gauge of blood sugar)—that refl...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Diabetes grain-free low-carb Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Eating right can help keep your body and mind healthy and extend your quality of life. But some older Americans may face barriers to getting enough nutrients or calories. Many ways aging can affect appetite Physiological changes that come with aging can result in reduced calorie needs, which can lead to decreased food intake and altered body composition, even in healthy older adults. This can be compounded by diminished smell and taste, and changes in hormone levels that affect how quickly you feel full. Depression, lack of independence, and social isolation can make food less appealing, further contributing to a less than...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs
Anyone who remembers the days before finger stick blood glucose meters became available to people with diabetes will recall how awful life was for diabetics. All they had was urine dipsticks which were sloppy, yielded only crude non-quantitative feedback on blood sugars, and gave you a gauge of what blood sugars were in the recent past, not the present. It meant that dosing insulin or diabetes drugs was grotesquely imprecise and accounted for many episodes of hypoglycemic coma and acceleration of diabetic complications. It was not uncommon in those days, for instance, for a type 1 diabetic to be blind and experience kidney...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: SIBO bowel flora Inflammation probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
  Americans consume the equivalent of 300 loaves of bread each year (representing enormous exposure to the amylopectin A carbohydrate that behaves like sugar or worse). They also consume 200 pounds of sugar. It is not uncommon for sugar alone to comprise a quarter of all calories taken in over the course of the day—some of it out in the open, some of it hidden. To understand the adverse effects of sugars—sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup, and other fructose-rich sweeteners, such as agave, honey, and maple syrup—we need to understand two phenomena: 1. Insulin resistance 2 Glycation. Insulin Resistanc...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Anti-aging BLOOD SUGAR Diabetes Dr. Davis Undoctored arthritis dementia grain-free grains health heart disease insulin joint pain weight gain Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
So much time and energy have been wasted these past 40 or so years in trying to reduce dietary fat, including saturated fat. All you need do is look around you to see the result: the most unhealthy, fattest, most diabetic population in history, prescribed more drugs, more reliant on this (corrupt and unhelpful) thing called modern healthcare, with people in healthcare such as your doctor blaming YOU, rather than themselves and their misguided message. After all, doctors and dietitians are following the dictates of the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the USDA food plate that carries the blessings of Big Food and a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Low-fat diet grain-free low-carb undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Right now the world is experiencing an epidemic that is projected to get much, much worse. It’s an epidemic of dementia, affecting 50 million people and millions more of their caregivers — staggering numbers that are projected to triple by 2050. The dementia crisis is such a massive worldwide issue that the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a strategic public health action plan, including compiling an organized database of quality dementia research and creating guidelines for the prevention of dementia. The guidelines have just been published, a 96-page document that is summarized here, as well as in th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Exercise and Fitness Healthy Aging Memory Nutrition Source Type: blogs
Looking for clues about the health of your brain? You might want to pay a visit to your eye doctor. Research increasingly links common eye conditions — glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy — to risk for Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. What’s interesting about the study results, says Dr. Albert Hofman, chair of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is that cataracts, another common age-related eye condition, had no apparent connection to dementia risk. This gives scientists an important clue about the cause of dementia and Alzheimer&rs...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Eye Health Source Type: blogs
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