Why is music good for the brain?

Can music really affect your well-being, learning, cognitive function, quality of life, and even happiness? A recent survey on music and brain health conducted by AARP revealed some interesting findings about the impact of music on cognitive and emotional well-being: Music listeners had higher scores for mental well-being and slightly reduced levels of anxiety and depression compared to people overall. Of survey respondents who currently go to musical performances, 69% rated their brain health as “excellent” or “very good,” compared to 58% for those who went in the past and 52% for those who never attended. Of those who reported often being exposed to music as a child, 68% rated their ability to learn new things as “excellent” or “very good,” compared to 50% of those who were not exposed to music. Active musical engagement, including those over age 50, was associated with higher rates of happiness and good cognitive function. Adults with no early music exposure but who currently engage in some music appreciation show above average mental well-being scores. Let’s take a closer look at this study Those are pretty impressive results, to be sure. However, this 20-minute online survey has some limitations. For one, it included 3,185 US adults ages 18 and older; that is a small number if you are extrapolating to 328 million people across the country. For another, it is really a survey of people’s opinions. For example, a...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Brain and cognitive health Healthy Aging Memory Mental Health Neurological conditions Source Type: blogs

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When you take a look at the state of things in the world right now, you quickly realize that it takes great strength to stand and live a meaningful life. In fact data shows that, both as individuals and nations, we are so stressed today than at any other period in history. Just to give you an idea, according to a compilation of data by disturbmenot: Between 75 - 90 percent of doctor visits in the US is in some way related to stress.49 percent of young adults (aged 18 - 24) experience high levels of stress.60 percent of adults resort to drinking as a way to escape stressful life events. The COVID-19 pandemic has...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: depression featured health and fitness motivation psychology self-improvement covid_19 pickthebrain resilience stress Source Type: blogs
At the dawn of the pandemic, as businesses shuttered and frontline workers braved inadequate conditions and the death toll began to tick frighteningly upward, I was home alone, nursing one selfish obsession: that I would use this time to get in really good shape. I am not proud of this–I would much rather write that I was raising money for communities disproportionately affected by this crisis, or delivering meals to the immunocompromised–but it’s the truth. The more I thought about it, the more the idea sharpened in my mind’s eye: this persistent fantasy of how I would emerge anew once the lockdown...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
AbstractIntroductionPrenatal maternal distress has a negative impact on the course of pregnancy, fetal development, offspring development, and later psychopathologies. The study aimed to determine the extent to which the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID ‐19) pandemic may aggravate the prenatal distress and psychiatric symptomatology of pregnant women.Material and methodsTwo cohorts of pregnant volunteer women were evaluated, one that was recruited before the COVID ‐19 pandemic (n = 496) through advertisements in prenatal clinics in Quebec, Canada, from April 2018 to March 2020; the other (n = 1258) w...
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
AbstractWe read with great interest the Special Editorial by Dr Thapa and co ‐authors on the importance of not neglecting emotions of pregnant women during the COVID‐19 pandemic1 as maternal mental health can be associated with short and long term risks for their and their children ’s physical and psychological health. Most studies on COVID‐19 in pregnancy have focused on physical effects of the pandemic on infected mothers as well as the possibility of vertical transmission: these tend to eclipse the equally relevant maternal mental health needs during these unprecedented times.
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: LETTER TO EDITOR Source Type: research
While things appear to be slowly opening up again in many parts of the world, many people continue to feel hesitant to leave their homes, fearful of exposure to COVID-19. The resulting sense of isolation, depression, and anxiety are keeping mental health hotlines busy. Without sounding too rosy, is there the possibility of extracting something positive from the turn inward that circumstances are now offering? A telephone survey of 818 Hong Kong residents of age 18-60 during the SARS epidemic in 2003 offers glimmers of hope.  Researchers have reported in the Journal of Infection (August, 2006) that over 60% of respond...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Communication Depression Friends Happiness Inspiration & Hope Mindfulness Psychology Relationships Self-Help Friendship Optimism social distancing Social Isolation Source Type: blogs
AbstractIntroductionPrenatal maternal distress has a negative impact on the course of pregnancy, fetal development, offspring development and later psychopathologies. The study aimed to determine the extent to which the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID ‐19) pandemic may aggravate pregnant women prenatal distress and psychiatric symptomatology.Material and methodsTwo cohorts of pregnant volunteer women were evaluated, one that was recruited before the COVID ‐19 pandemic (n=496) through advertisements in prenatal clinics in Quebec, Canada, from April 2018 to March 2020; the other (n=1258) was recruited online during the p...
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
There is a research model going around that suggests as many as 150,000 additional people could die from mental health-related outcomes of COVID-19. I could argue the merits of the mathematical model as many of my colleagues have. I could also make the case that discussing the depths of despair and predicting increasing suicide rates over and over could, in fact, lead to copycat suicides. But what if I took an alternative stance, and told you that—though absolutely no one would wish a pandemic on anyone— this is actually what mental health needed to stop being stigmatized and start being valued? I’m not ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Note by Dr Sumer Sethi Recently we launched our unique medical education centric app for young Doctors calledeMedicoz. On this in addition to routine discussions Doctors also discuss various aspects of the profession. In a recent discussion series young Doctors brainstormed and tried crystal balling the future of the medicine and technology. It is wonderful to hear their thoughts on future. It is for certain future looks really happening for medical profession, computers and machine learning will re- invent the way we practice medicine. Targeted therapy is another important area, 3D printing , understanding the value ...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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