Botox for TMJ disorders may not lead to bone loss in the short term, but more research is needed

Low-dose botox injections for jaw and facial pain not linked to bone changes, but NYU Dentistry researchers observe reduced bone density at higher dosesNew York UniversityBotox injections to manage jaw and facial pain do not result in clinically significant changes in jaw bone when used short term and in low doses, according to researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. However, they found evidence of bone loss when higher doses were used.The researchers, whose findings are published in theJournal of Oral Health Rehabilitation, call for further clinical studies to track bone- and muscle-related changes with long-term use of Botox for TMJD, or temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders.TMJDs are a group of common pain conditions that occur in the jaw joint and surrounding muscles, with the most common type involving the muscles responsible for chewing. While many individuals manage their TMJD symptoms with conservative treatments such as jaw exercises, oral appliances, dietary changes, and pain medication, some do not respond to these treatments.Botox (or botulinum toxin), an FDA-approved injectable drug known for its wrinkle-reducing capabilities, is approved to treat certain muscle and pain disorders, including migraines. It works in part by temporarily paralyzing or weakening muscles. In the U.S., a Phase 3 clinical trial is currently underway to study the use of Botox to treat TMJD, but in the meantime, it is increasingly being used off-label.Thus far, small studies using ...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

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There is no consensus in literature about role of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in chronic pain of TMD. The aim of this poster presentation is to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of TENS therapy for symptomatic relief of chronic pain in specific subgroups (myalgia, disc displacements, arthralgia, and headache attributed to TMJ) of TMD patients. Sixty patients of TMD were included in a study and randomly divided into 2 groups: Group A-TENS group and Group B-Drug group. Thirty patients were given TENS therapy, and 30 patients were given diclofenac sodium 50mg twice daily for 10 days.
Source: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract OBJECTIVE: In this experimental study, we aimed to determine whether guided music listening (GML) - a music intervention based on models of mood mediation and attention modulation - modulates masticatory muscle activity and awake bruxism in subjects with chronic painful muscular temporomandibular disorders (TMD myalgia, mTMD), a condition causing a significant burden to patients, their families, and healthcare systems. BACKGROUND: Awake bruxism - a stress behavior characterized by clenching of the teeth - is a strong contributor to chronic mTMD. GML modulates psychological stress and motor responses ...
Source: Headache - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Headache Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: These findings highlight the importance of psychologic functioning in the assessment and management of these overlapping pain conditions. PMID: 32975543 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Orofacial Pain - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Oral Facial Pain Headache Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Atopic disorders, previously recognized as predictors of poor sleep, are associated with COPCs after accounting for sleep problems. PMID: 32975542 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Orofacial Pain - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Oral Facial Pain Headache Source Type: research
Authors: Sharma S, Slade GD, Fillingim RB, Greenspan JD, Rathnayaka N, Ohrbach R Abstract AIMS: To investigate whether TMD-related characteristics are indeed specific to TMD or whether they are also associated with other chronic overlapping pain conditions (COPCs). METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 22 characteristics related broadly to TMD (eg, jaw kinesiophobia, overuse behaviors, and functional limitation) were measured in 178 painful TMD cases who were also classified according to four COPCs: headache, low back pain, irritable bowel syndrome, and fibromyalgia. Differences in mean subscale scores were c...
Source: Journal of Orofacial Pain - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Oral Facial Pain Headache Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: When evaluating nociceptive sensitivity in a chronic pain patient, comorbid pain conditions should be considered, as the more salient feature underlying sensitivity is likely the number rather than the type(s) of pain conditions. PMID: 32975540 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Orofacial Pain - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Oral Facial Pain Headache Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Heat maps from a pain body manikin illustrated that very little of the body was pain free within these COPCs. All pain attributes were the most severe for fibromyalgia and the least severe for irritable bowel syndrome. Within each index COPC, pain intensity, pain interference, and the proportion of participants with high-impact pain increased with each additional comorbid COPC up to four or more COPCs (including the index COPC) (P
Source: Journal of Orofacial Pain - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Oral Facial Pain Headache Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: There was greater overlap between fibromyalgia and either temporomandibular disorders or low back pain than between other pairs of COPCs. While musculoskeletal conditions exhibited some features that could be explained by a single functional syndrome, headache and irritable bowel syndrome did not. PMID: 32975538 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Orofacial Pain - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Oral Facial Pain Headache Source Type: research
Authors: Stohler CS PMID: 32975535 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Orofacial Pain - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Oral Facial Pain Headache Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Awake oral behaviors were positively associated with orofacial pain, but only under the condition of a strong belief of the patients in causal attribution of these behaviors to the jaw pain complaint. No such association was present in case of a low causal attribution belief. It appeared that, within this patient cohort, the relationship between causal attribution belief and self-reported oral behaviors was (in part) the result of shared psychologic risk factors. PMID: 32870956 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Orofacial Pain - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Oral Facial Pain Headache Source Type: research
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