Prevalent Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine influenza virus with 2009 pandemic viral genes facilitating human infection Microbiology

Pigs are considered as important hosts or “mixing vessels” for the generation of pandemic influenza viruses. Systematic surveillance of influenza viruses in pigs is essential for early warning and preparedness for the next potential pandemic. Here, we report on an influenza virus surveillance of pigs from 2011 to 2018 in...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Biological Sciences Source Type: research

Related Links:

This article provides a brief overview on how children are a key contributor to pandemic Influenza A (2009 H1N1) and we would like to draw your attention to the need for a new vaccine for children to improve disease prevention and a positive impact on the community. PMID: 32959089 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Curr Microbiol Source Type: research
MICROBIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for “Prevalent Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine influenza virus with 2009 pandemic viral genes facilitating human infection,” by Honglei Sun, Yihong Xiao, Jiyu Liu, Dayan Wang, Fangtao Li, Chenxi Wang, Chong Li, Junda Zhu, Jingwei Song, Haoran Sun, Zhimin Jiang, Litao Liu, Xin Zhang, Kai Wei,...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Tags: SI Corrections Source Type: research
Pandemic influenza A viruses can emerge from swine, an intermediate host that supports adaptation of human-preferred receptor-binding specificity by the hemagglutinin (HA) surface antigen. Other HA traits necessary for pandemic potential are poorly understood. For swine influenza viruses isolated in 2009 –2016, gamma-clade viruses had less stable HA proteins (activation pH 5.5–5.9) than pandemic clade (pH 5.0–5.5). Gamma-clade viruses replicated to higher levels in mammalian cells than pandemic clade. In ferrets, a model for human adaptation, a relatively stable HA protein (pH 5.5–5.6) was n ecessar...
Source: eLife - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Microbiology and Infectious Disease Source Type: research
Once a dangerous new pathogen is out, as we are seeing, it can be difficult if not impossible to prevent it going global. One as contagious as SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to infect the whole of humanity. Eighty per cent of cases may be benign, but with such a large pool of susceptible hosts, the numbers who experience severe illness and die can still be shockingly high. So the only sensible answer to the question, how do we stop this from happening again, is: by doing all we can to prevent such pathogens infecting humans in the first place. And that means taking a long, hard look at our relationship with the natural world...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
In conclusion, it is necessary for the well-being of humans and pigs to closely monitor swine influenza viruses containing avian-like hemagglutinin with PA and NP genes from 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses.
Source: Archives of Virology - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Why are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.Scientists from UCLA and the University of Arizona have found that people ’s ability to fight off the flu virus is determined not only by the subtypes of flu they have had throughout their lives, but also by the sequence in which they are been infected by the viruses. Their study is published in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens.The research offers an explanation for why some people fare much worse than others when infected with the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 31 December 2019Source: Veterinary MicrobiologyAuthor(s): Dieudonné Tialla, Aurélie Sausy, Assana Cissé, Tani Sagna, Abdoul Kader Ilboudo, Georges Anicet Ouédraogo, Judith M. Hübschen, Zékiba Tarnagda, Chantal J. SnoeckAbstractDespite improvement of human and avian influenza surveillance, swine influenza surveillance in sub-Saharan Africa is scarce and pandemic preparedness is still deemed inadequate, including in Burkina Faso. This cross-sectional study therefore aimed to investigate the (past) exposure of pigs to influenza A viruses. Practices of ...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 November 2019Source: Veterinary MicrobiologyAuthor(s): Jiahui Liu, Zihe Li, Yanlei Cui, Haiyan Yang, Hu Shan, Chuanmei ZhangAbstractWe evaluated the phenotype and genotype of a fatal influenza/canine distemper virus coinfection found in farmed mink in China. We identified a novel subtype H1N1 influenza virus strain from the lungs of infected mink designated A/Mink/Shandong/1121/2017 (H1N1). The results of phylogenetic analysis of 8 gene fragments of the H1N1 strain showed the virus was a swine origin triple-reassortant H1N1 influenza virus: with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 segments (PB2, PB...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
This study reports virological and epidemiological data accumulated through passive surveillance conducted during 1,825 herd visits from 2011 to 2018. Among them, 887 (48.6%) tested swIAV-positive. The proportion of positive cases remained stable year-on-year and year-round. The European avian-like swine H1N1 (H1avN1) virus was the most frequently identified (69.6%), and was widespread across the country. The European human-like reassortant swine H1N2 (H1huN2) virus accounted for 22.1% and was only identified in the north-western quarter and recently in the far north. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus (3.6%) was detec...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
This study illustrates how recurrent influenza infections increase the co-infection risk and facilitate evolutionary jumps by successive gene exchanges. It recalls the importance of appropriate biosecurity measures inside holdings to limit virus persistence and interspecies transmissi ons, which both contribute to the emergence of new potentially zoonotic viruses.
Source: Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
More News: Academies | Bird Flu | Flu Pandemic | Genetics | H1N1 | Influenza | Microbiology | Pandemics | Science | Swine Flu | Warnings