5 Ways to Help Your Child Who Self-Injures

Hidden pain is difficult for anyone to manage without help, especially for those who are young. Nothing in ordinary life naturally prepares us for pain that cannot be expressed. Additionally, the outward world — what your child, teen, or young adult observes — often offers a distortion of what is really going on in the lives of others. Television and movies present unrealistic details, magazines and online media may glamorize extreme ideals and peer behavior, and friendship upheaval exerts tremendous pressure at a time in life when big changes are happening to the body and mind. You may be the last person to find out your child is struggling. If you have no prior experience with this topic or related mental health training, you may not know how to help. Self-injury (non-suicidal) may not have one single cause that is easy to understand. Coping skills can help, but the lack of these skills affects behavior and self-confidence adversely. Psychological pain is very different from visible, physical hurt but is just as real. Confusion about mixed emotions and difficulty in understanding how to process them may compound the main issue or issues by causing feelings of loneliness, anger, guilt, self-hatred, or worthlessness.  First, don’t panic. If you remain calm and offer unconditional love and open communication, you set a model for your child or teen to follow. Let him or her know you are there to help with suggestions that really work. Many resources are...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Child Development Self Harm Self Injury Source Type: blogs

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ConclusionsParticipants with self ‐reported fibromyalgia have a higher prevalence of comorbid mental and physical disorders, and lower mean levels of mental and physical quality of life than their counterparts without fibromyalgia.SignificanceWe showed here a strong association of self ‐reported fibromyalgia with both mental and physical comorbidities. We showed that among participants with self‐reported fibromyalgia, more than 8 out of 10 had at least three other physical comorbidities, and almost half had at least three mental comorbidities. This is a cross‐sectional study using a representative sample of the US ...
Source: European Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
ConclusionsParticipants with self ‐reported fibromyalgia have a higher prevalence of comorbid mental and physical disorders, and lower mean levels of mental and physical quality of life than their counterparts without fibromyalgia.
Source: European Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Stress caused by uncertainty can be paralyzing. The information we are getting about the coronavirus seems to be changing by the hour — creating unprecedented uncertainty. There is a good reason your nerves are jangle, or you are feeling unsettled or anxious. Uncertainty is perceived as unsafe and potentially painful. Whether the situation is predictably positive or predictably negative, your brain prefers something familiar to something unfamiliar. Under stress, our brains depend on instinct rather than rational thought because the part of the brain responsible for critical thinking is busy dealing with the psycholo...
Source: Embrace Your Heart Wellness Initiative - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Stress Management uncertainty Source Type: blogs
Learning about suicide is important. Most individuals who end their lives (over 40,000 each year in the United States alone) struggle with mental health disorders. Knowing the signs and symptoms do not always prevent suicides but could help you protect yourself, your family and your friends. Reach out to health professionals if you are worried, and keep in mind you can also research reputable organizations online. The one thing you don’t want to do is stay uninformed about something that could mean the difference between life and death. Warning signs that may indicate a mental health disorder could be mistaken for th...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Stigma Suicide Depression grieving Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Learning how to pay attention to our attention (meta-attention) can be transformative. Using principles from cognitive science, we can create a comprehensive approach (attention capital theory in medicine) to reclaim the meaning and joy that has been depleted from our profession. Increasing the difficulty of our work to match our skill level, delegating low-level tasks to help us focus on critical steps in our physician zone, creating rules to eliminate distractions, and noticing both the wonder and suffering around us may be more important than resilience training or wellness modules. Although well-intention...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Burnout physician burnout physician wellness Sanj Katyal Source Type: blogs
Comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional conditions co-occurring with a primary condition. In this episode, host schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers with her cohost Gabe Howard will be discussing comorbidity with schizophrenia. Comorbidity is associated with worse health outcomes, more complex clinical management and increased health care costs. Occupational therapist and host of the podcast Occupied, Brock Cook, will be joining us to discuss ways that he works with people with schizophrenia to manage multiple health issues.  Highlights from “Comorbidity with Schizophrenia” Episode [01:28] What ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antipsychotic Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia comorbid comorbid psychiatric conditions Comorbidities Comorbidity Diagnosis Of Schizophrenia Livi Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: OCD prevalence in Singapore is high. Most people with OCD do not seek treatment despite experiencing significant comorbidity and loss of quality of life. PMID: 32200393 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Ann Acad Med Singapore Source Type: research
Learning more information about the addiction treatment process can be difficult if you do not know where to start looking. One of the many places individuals may begin their search is with their primary care provider, which makes it important to know how to ask your doctor about addiction treatment. There are many reasons an individual may seek addiction treatment advice from their doctor, including: The doctor is prescribing medications that they believe they have become addicted to The individual is suffering from a condition that they believe their addiction is worsening or impacting The individual doesn’t have...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction Treatment and Program Resources doctor doctors treatment center treatment facilities treatment facility treatment options treatment programs Source Type: blogs
Opioids are a group of very strong pain relievers used to relieve pain after a surgery or traumatic injury. They are much more effective than over-the-counter pain relievers, however, they are also highly addictive. People who suffer from mental health conditions are much more likely to become addicted to opioids, making it important to understand the link between opioids and mental health. The Connection Between Addiction to Opioids and Mental Health People with mood and anxiety disorders are twice as likely to use opioids as people without mental health disorders They are also more than three times as likely to misuse ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Mental Health mental health costs mental health coverage mental illness opiate addiction opiates opioid opioid crisis opioids Source Type: blogs
Feeling depressed for no reason? Here’s what you should know. Depression can become a huge problem in your life, but many people may not actually recognize the signs of depression or symptoms; instead, they’ll just assume that they’re sad. But if you’re waking up depressed, or feeling depressed for no reason every day, then you may not just be sad or going through a “phase.”  9 Subtle Signs Of Depression I Was Too Depressed To Notice Wondering “Why am I depressed?” all the time might make you feel like you’re going crazy or that you’ll never feel b...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Disorders General LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Publishers Self-Help YourTango Emptiness Hopelessness Sad Sadness Seasonal Affective Disorder Suicidal Thoughts Thyroid Source Type: blogs
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