Why It ’s So Hard to Get Coronavirus Testing in the U.S. Right Now

When employees of Massachusetts biotech company Biogen were informed in late February that several among them had been diagnosed with the infection after a company-wide meeting, they immediately went to hospitals for testing, but were turned away. Because of the scarce number of tests available in the U.S., doctors, upon the advice of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), were following strict protocols for who could be tested: people who had symptoms and had traveled to a country where cases were endemic, or had been in close contact with someone who had tested positive. Most of the Biogen employees didn’t have any of the symptoms of fever, cough or difficult breathing that are the hallmarks of COVID-19, but understandably wanted to know if they had been exposed. Two weeks after the meeting, 77 of Massachusetts’ 95 confirmed cases are Biogen employees. The criteria for who can be tested have since been relaxed, and doctors can now order the test for any patient, using their best judgement on whether it’s necessary. Still, testing in the US lags far behind that in other countries, due to a combination of technical and policy issues, as well as political pressure. Keep up to date with our daily coronavirus newsletter by clicking here. When the first cases of COVID-19 were reported in the US, two labs at the CDC were the only ones permitted to conduct COVID-19 testing, using a test developed by the agency’s own researchers. When the CDC tried to expand...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 30 May 2020Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Qi Fu, Zhenhai Yu
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 29 May 2020Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Nagesh Kishan Panchal, E.P. Sabina
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In this study, five machine learning algorithms and twelve types of molecular fingerprints were employed to generate QSAR discriminant models for mitochondrial toxicity. A threshold moving method was adopted to resolve the imbalance issue in the training data. Consensus of the models by an averaging probability strategy improved prediction performance. The best model has correct classification rates of 81.8% and 88.3% in ten-fold cross validation and external validation, respectively. Substructures such as phenol, carboxylic acid, nitro and arylchloride were found informative through analysis of information gain and freque...
Source: Chemosphere - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Chemosphere Source Type: research
M, León VM Abstract The occurrence of bioactive compounds and contaminant-associated effects was assessed by means of in vivo and in vitro assays using different extractable fractions of surface sediments from a contaminated coastal lagoon (Mar Menor, SE Spain). Sediment elutriates and clean seawater, previously exposed to whole sediment, were used for assessing the in vivo toxicity on embryo development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. Agonist and antagonist activities relating to estrogen and androgen receptors and agonist activities on aryl hydrocarbon receptor (expressed as ethoxy...
Source: Chemosphere - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Chemosphere Source Type: research
e;as M, Macías F Abstract This work deals with the distribution of rare earth elements (REE) in the abandoned Tharsis mines under different hydrological conditions. High concentrations of REE were observed; mean value of 1747 μg/L. The highest concentrations of REE were recorded during the dry period (DP, mean of 2220 μg/L) due to high evaporation and strong water-rock interactions. However, some sampling points showed the highest REE concentrations during the wet period (WP) due to the washing out of large dumps during intense rainfall. The concentration of REE shows a positive correlation ...
Source: Chemosphere - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Chemosphere Source Type: research
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Source: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Publication date: 30 May 2020Source: New Scientist, Volume 246, Issue 3284Author(s): Adam Vaughan
Source: New Scientist - Category: Science Source Type: research
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Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news
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