What homebody island birds could tell us about adaptation and evolution
(Colorado State University) Researchers led by Colorado State University's Cameron Ghalambor are launching a National Science Foundation-supported study of what evolutionary biologists term 'microgeographic' adaptation strategies of island scrub-jays, North America's only island-endemic bird. Island scrub-jays live exclusively on Santa Cruz Island, one of the Channel Islands off the southern California coast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nigeria:Govt to Distribute Insecticide-Treated Nets to Prevent Malaria
[Leadership] The Federal Government says it will distribute 14.4 million Long Lasting Insecticidal Nets (LLINs) in four selected malaria most endemic states across the country before the end of this year. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - August 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

One Major Reason the AIDS Epidemic Isn ’t Going Away
It's a serious threat to progress in HIV treatment and prevention —and something we have the knowledge to stop, especially in health care settings.August 08, 2018It's a serious threat to public health and progress in HIV treatment and prevention —and something we have the knowledge to stop.A few years ago Dany Stolbunov, now 20, told his doctor in Ukraine that he wanted to go to medical school. He was sharing his ambitions with someone he admired and trusted, who he thought might believe in him, the person responsible for his care.“I told him I wanted to become a physician, too.”“You can&rsquo...
Source: IntraHealth International - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: lfreeze Source Type: news

Africa:Leprosy Increases As World Gives Attention to Newer Endemic Diseases
[IPS] Maputo -In the first six months of this year, the southern African nation of Mozambique has already registered 300 more cases of leprosy, some 951 cases, than it registered for the whole of 2017. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 3, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Nigeria recalls 2.4 million bottles of codeine cough syrup
Nigeria has recalled 2.4 million bottles of cough syrup containing codeine after national outrage earlier this year over endemic use of opioids. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Q & A: Leprosy Increases as World Gives Attention to Newer Endemic Diseases
A young boy from the Philippines with leprosy. The chronic disease is curable, and if treated in time disabilities related to the disease can be averted. Courtesy: moyerphotos/CC By 2.0By Elisio MuchangaMAPUTO, Jul 30 2018 (IPS)In the first six months of this year, the southern African nation of Mozambique has already registered 300 more cases of leprosy, some 951 cases, than it registered for the whole of 2017.The country, which had previously eliminated the chronic disease in 2008, is receiving funding from the Nippon Foundation—a non-profit philanthropic organisation from Japan that is active in many countrie...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Elisio Muchanga Tags: Africa Development & Aid Featured Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Nippon Foundation Source Type: news

Infectious Diseases A-Z: Zika virus cases lower, but virus remains a risk
The number of reported Zika virus cases is much lower so far this year than at this point in 2017. However, pregnant women remain advised not to travel to areas where there is a risk of contracting the virus. "It?s still important that pregnant women avoid travel to Zika-endemic areas. We know that there is [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 30, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Eradicating Leprosy in Mozambique, a Complicated Task
World Health Organization goodwill ambassador for Leprosy Elimination and chair of the Nippon Foundation, Yohei Sasakawa (left), holds the hand of a leprosy patient. Sasakawa visited Mozambique’s rural Namaita Centre to assess the progress of leprosy patients. The Nippon Foundation has been providing funds and medication in order to eliminate leprosy in Mozambique. Credit: Elísio Muchanga/IPSBy Elisio MuchangaNAMPULA PROVINCE, Mozambique, Jul 28 2018 (IPS)It takes Faurito António, 42, from Lalaua district, Nampula Province, two hours to reach his nearest health centre in order to receive the drugs neces...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Elisio Muchanga Tags: Africa Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Nippon Foundation Source Type: news

Opportunistic domestic violence screening for pregnant and post-partum women by community based health care providers - O'Reilly R, Peters K.
BACKGROUND: Domestic violence against women is a global endemic that can commence or escalate during pregnancy and continue postpartum. Pregnant and postpartum women generally access health care providers more at this time than at any other time in their l... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news

Whole genome sequencing of P. brasiliensis isolates of endemic areas in Argentina and Paraguay
Conference abstracts (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - July 24, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: BethBradshaw Source Type: news

Scientists review the antibacterial and antifungal properties of dragon’s blood, a flowering plant native to Mexico, that has long been used in folk medicine
(Natural News) The medicinal herb Jatropha neopauciflora Pax, more commonly known as dragon’s blood, possesses potent antibacterial and antioxidant properties that may hold potential in disease treatment, according to a study published in the African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines. The plant is notably endemic to Mexico and found mostly in the Tehuacan Cuicatlan Valley. A... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nigeria:New Rotary District Governor Sees End to Polio in Nigeria
[Guardian] The new District Governor, Rotary International District 9110, Rotn. Kola Sodipo, has vowed to sustain the present status of zero report of polio virus in Nigeria until the country is totally free and declared polio non-endemic nation. He said this during his installation ceremony, which took place at Muson Centre, Lagos. (Source: AllAfrica News: Polio)
Source: AllAfrica News: Polio - July 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The first endemic Baltic Sea fish species received its name
(University of Helsinki) Researchers at the University of Helsinki discovered and named a new endemic fish species in the Baltic Sea, the 'Baltic flounder,' Platichthys solemdali. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New & Resurgent Infectious Diseases Can Have Far-reaching Economic Repercussions
DAVID E. BLOOM is the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography, DANIEL CADARETTE is a research assistant, and JP SEVILLA is a research associate, all at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.By David E. Bloom, Daniel Cadarette and JP SevillaWASHINGTON DC, Jul 3 2018 (IPS)Infectious diseases and associated mortality have abated, but they remain a significant threat throughout the world.We continue to fight both old pathogens, such as the plague, that have troubled humanity for millennia and new pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), that have mutated or spilled over ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David E. Bloom and JP Sevilla Tags: Active Citizens Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Legal duties, professional obligations or notional guidelines? Screening, treatment and referral of domestic violence cases in primary health care settings in South Africa - Artz L, Meer T, Aschman G.
BACKGROUND: Since 2013, approximately 4400 women have been murdered by their partners in South Africa. This is five times higher than the per capita global average. Domestic violence is known to be cyclical, endemic and frequently involves multiple victims... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

East Africa:EAC Moves to Curb Rift Valley Fever Spread
[Citizen] Arusha -The East African Community (EAC) has ordered a restriction on livestock movement within the region as part of new measures to limit the spread of the endemic rift valley fever. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 25, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Cholera spread tracked at household level
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) For the first time, the transmission of cholera has been tracked at the household level across Dhaka, Bangladesh, a city with a 'hyper-endemic' level of the disease. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators found that nearly 80 per cent of the cholera transmission in Dhaka occurred between people who shared a household. The results of the large-scale genomic study could be used by public health officials to improve cholera control strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New genus of extinct Holocene gibbon associated with humans in Imperial China
Although all extant apes are threatened with extinction, there is no evidence for human-caused extinctions of apes or other primates in postglacial continental ecosystems, despite intensive anthropogenic pressures associated with biodiversity loss for millennia in many regions. Here, we report a new, globally extinct genus and species of gibbon, Junzi imperialis, described from a partial cranium and mandible from a ~2200- to 2300-year-old tomb from Shaanxi, China. Junzi can be differentiated from extant hylobatid genera and the extinct Quaternary gibbon Bunopithecus by using univariate and multivariate analyses of craniode...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Turvey, S. T., Bruun, K., Ortiz, A., Hansford, J., Hu, S., Ding, Y., Zhang, T., Chatterjee, H. J. Tags: Anthropology, Paleontology reports Source Type: news

Scientists genetically engineer pigs immune to costly disease
Gene-editing technology could be propelled into commercial farms within five yearsScientists have genetically engineered pigs to be immune to one of the world ’s most costly animal diseases, in an advance that could propel gene-editing technology into commercial farms within five years.The trial, led by the University of Edinburgh ’s Roslin Institute, showed that the pigs were completely immune to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), a disease that is endemic across the globe and costs the European pig industry nearly £1.5bn in pig deaths and decreased productivity each year.Continue read...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Genetics Science Medical research Meat The meat industry Farming Environment Food Source Type: news

Nigeria:World Sickle Cell Day - Why Disease Remains Endemic in Nigeria
[Premium Times] As Nigeria joins the rest of the world today to celebrate World Sickle Cell Awareness Day, thousands of the country's citizens are still under the clutches of the deadly disease. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 20, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Consumers at risk from contaminated and diseased meat
The public could be at risk of eating contaminated and diseased meat because of failings at slaughterhouses, according to a survey of meat hygiene inspectors published today (Sunday) by UNISON. The findings – summarised in the report A Raw Deal – highlight concerns that contaminated and diseased meat could be cleared as fit for human consumption. It found that virtually every meat hygiene inspector surveyed (98%) said that the meat industry couldn’t be trusted to ensure no faecal contamination was present before meat was sold on to consumers. In addition, 96% of the inspectors thought that staff directly ...
Source: UNISON Health care news - June 16, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: Charlotte Jeffs Tags: News Press release dave prentis meat hygiene meat inspection meat inspectors Source Type: news

Pfizer announces extension of Zithromax ® Antibiotic Donation Program through 2025 to help eliminate world's leading infectious cause of blindness
Pfizer Inc. will extend its donation of the antibiotic Zithromax® (azithromycin) to the International Trachoma Initiative through 2025, building on the company's 20-years of work to help eliminate the world's leading infectious cause of blindness. Approximately 163 million people are at risk of developing the disease and this recommitment ensures that Pfizer, through the International Trachoma Initiative (ITI), will continue to provide trachoma endemic countries with donated antibiotics that are a critical component of the global strategy to eliminate this neglected tropical disease (NTD). (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - June 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Pfizer Business and Industry Source Type: news

Patient refusal for trichiasis surgery in Tanzania based on misconception of recovery time
(PLOS) Trachomatous trichiasis, caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis, is one of the leading causes of preventable blindness worldwide. It is common in areas of the world that lack access to health care and clean water. A relatively simple surgery can spare the patient's vision, and although this surgery is usually performed free of charge in endemic regions, multiple studies indicate that surgical refusal is common. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Labor exploitation is endemic in global tea and cocoa industries, international study finds
(University of Sheffield) Labor exploitation including forced labor is endemic at the base of global tea and cocoa supply chains, according to a pioneering international study published by researchers at the University of Sheffield today (31 May 2018). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Michael Nasr ’21: Understanding Patients to Drive Innovation
Long before coming to Geisel, Michael Nasr ’21 learned the value of living life holistically—he’s now putting into practice what he’s learned to solve endemic problems. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - May 22, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Susan Green Tags: Education Insider News engineering first-year student global health health equity Michael Nasr Student Spotlight Source Type: news

What You Should Know About the Nipah Virus Outbreak
Ten people in the South Indian state of Kerala have died after being infected by the Nipah virus, an emerging disease thought to be spread by fruit bats and other animals. Here’s what you should know about the outbreak. What is the Nipah virus? The Nipah virus is a highly contagious and deadly virus that was first identified in 1999 when pig farmers in Malaysia and Singapore became very sick. During that outbreak, nearly 300 people were infected, and more than 100 people died. To stop the outbreak, authorities had to euthanize over one million pigs. Since then, the virus has been identified in outbreaks in Bangladesh...
Source: TIME: Health - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

What is the economic impact of malaria for a pregnant woman living in an endemic area of Colombia?
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) Although malaria treatment is free of charge in Colombia, the economic costs incurred by pregnant women seeking care are considerable (mainly due to transportation and time lost), according to a new study led by ISGlobal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Lassa Fever: Introduction
World Health Organization. 02/2018 This one-hour course provides an introduction to Lassa fever, a viral hemorrhagic fever with symptoms similar to those of Ebola virus disease that is endemic in much of West Africa, and usually sparks a seasonal outbreak from December to March. Participants will learn to describe signs, symptoms, and transmission routes of Lassa fever; list prevention and control techniques; and describe Lassa fever's public health challenges. (Video or Multimedia) Site requires free registration. (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

How Nigeria ’s Start-Stop Immunization Battle Is Winning the War to Eradicate Polio in Africa
The 50 million doses of polio vaccine stored in laboratory refrigerators all over Nigeria had a big weekend planned for them. If things had gone as intended, on Saturday morning, May 5, all of the little vials would have been trucked, flown, biked, walked around the all 36 states of the nation – to be delivered to every single one of the 49,882,036 known Nigerian children under 5 years old. But, as things developed, an outbreak of circulating virus in one region of the country upended those plans for routine immunization, replacing them for now with a crisis response in the affected area. The 50 million doses will in...
Source: TIME: Health - May 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger / Abuja Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Nigeria onetime vaccines Source Type: news

Progress Toward Measles Elimination - Western Pacific Region, 2013-2017
During 2013-2016, a resurgence of measles occurred in Western Pacific Region, with large-scale outbreaks in Mongolia, the Philippines, and Vietnam, and increased endemic transmission in China; in 2014, annual incidence increased to 68.9 cases per million. However, with control of the outbreaks, in 2017, incidence decreased to a new historic low (5.2 per million). (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - May 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Claims of sexual harassment and assault threaten UN agency - Zarocostas J.
Sexual harassment and assault investigation at UNAIDS draws attention to an endemic problem. Critics say the UN's internal system is flawed and call for external oversight. John Zarocostas reports. The controversy over a high-profile investigation th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Africa:Today Is World Malaria Day-Are We Ready to Beat Malaria?
[Ghanaian Times] MANY activities are taking place across the globe today, especially in malaria endemic countries, to raise awareness and engender commitment by policymakers to reduce the burden of Malaria. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - April 26, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Africa:Malaria Elimination Impossible Without Scientists' Input
[Nation] The World Health Organization (WHO) says most malaria-endemic African countries have made tremendous progress in the fight against the disease. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 26, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Guinea: Gearing Up for Malaria Season
April 25, 2018Malaria is one of the leading killers of young children worldwide, even though it is both preventable and easily cured. Doctors Without Borders/M édecins Sans Frontières (MSF) treated 2.5 million people for malaria in 2017.Malaria tends to come in waves, seasonally, or at specific times of the year in zones where it is endemic. At any given time of year, there is a “malaria peak” somewhere in the world. We know that malaria season will come, and we know that it will cause the deaths of thousands of children. (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Kavita Menon Source Type: news

The Gang Rape and Murder of an 8 Year Old Child in India
Displaced children in Kenya. Credit: IPSBy Siddharth ChatterjeeNAIROBI, Kenya, Apr 23 2018 (IPS)Grotesque and barbaric, is the only way to describe the rape and murder of an 8 year old child, in a country where women and girls are traditionally revered as Goddesses. There have been numerous cases of rape across the country, however, the story of little Asifa, who was sedated, gang raped, tortured and then murdered in Kathua, Jammu and Kashmir has haunted us all. While Asifa was killed in January 2018, the details of the case only grabbed national headlines in April, this was partly due to the heinous nature of the crime, a...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Siddharth Chatterjee Tags: Africa Crime & Justice Gender Gender Violence Headlines Health Human Rights Migration & Refugees TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

World Immunization Week 2018: Protected Together, #VaccinesWork
22 April 2018, Cairo – This year’s World Immunization Week campaign, celebrated from 24 to 30 April, aims to highlight that protecting entire communities with vaccines protects everyone and so the theme of this year’s campaign is “Protected Together, #VaccinesWork”.  Immunization is one of the most successful and cost-effective health interventions. Studies show that every US$ 1 spent on childhood immunization returns US$ 44 in economic and social benefits.  Immunization protects everyone – from infants to senior citizens – against disabling illnesses, disability a...
Source: WHO EMRO News - April 22, 2018 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news

New research findings suggest that most vulnerable patients across Africa are at risk of receiving sub-optimal malaria treatment
(Burness) A large proportion of malaria patients in endemic countries in Africa are likely to receive doses of malaria medicine that are too low to offer effective treatment, according to new research presented at the MIM Conference taking place in Dakar this week. Researchers found that an estimated 21.3 million people -- or 24 percent of all confirmed malaria cases--were at risk of being prescribed inadequate doses of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACTs), the frontline treatment against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Miami among cities at risk from yellow fever spread : study
GENEVA (Reuters) - Miami is at risk of a deadly yellow fever outbreak because the disease could thrive there but the city has no checks on travelers arriving from endemic zones, a study to be published by the World Health Organization showed. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Do I Still Need to Worry About Zika?
Warmer weather signals the onset of vacations, destination weddings and—unfortunately—mosquitoes. Since the Zika virus emerged three years ago in the Americas, cases have declined, but many people wonder if they still need to consider the mosquito-borne disease when making travel plans. “The bottom line is yes,” says Dr. Paul Mead, a medical officer in the CDC’s division of vector-borne diseases: Americans do still need to take precautions to protect against Zika. The CDC recommends that pregnant couples who live or travel to areas with Zika (a list that currently includes countries in Africa,...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime places with Zika zika travel Source Type: news

International Chagas Day: MSF Launches Campaign to Raise Awareness
Press releaseInternational Chagas Day: MSF Launches Campaign to Raise AwarenessApril 14, 2018The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/M édecins Sans Frontières (MSF) launched the awareness campaign "A big heart is not always a good thing" for International Chagas Disease Day today. The initiative aims to raise public awareness of a neglected disease that affects the health of more than 6 million people around the world, especially in Latin America where it is endemic. (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - April 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Brienne Prusak Source Type: news

Global Health: ‘ We ’ re Out of Options ’ : Doctors Battle Drug-Resistant Typhoid Outbreak
An aggressive typhoid strain, resistant to five types of antibiotics, is expected to replace other endemic strains worldwide. It could evolve to become untreatable. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY BAUMGAERTNER Tags: Typhoid Antibiotics Vaccination and Immunization Pakistan Epidemics Source Type: news

Namibia:Hepatitis E Might Remain in Informal Settlements
[New Era] Windhoek -There are fears that hepatitis E in Havana and Goreangab informal settlements could become endemic, according to epidemiologist, Dr Lilliane Kahuika, of the Ministry of Health and Social Services. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 12, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Nigeria:Why Lassa Fever Is Endemic, Difficult to Curtail
[This Day] Abuja -The deadly Lassa Fever outbreak may continue to threaten the lives of Nigerians and health workers for a long time to come, findings have revealed. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 12, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Pakistan Launches Countrywide Polio Eradication Drive Pakistan Launches Countrywide Polio Eradication Drive
Pakistan launched a nationwide polio vaccination drive on Monday to try to reach 38.7 million children and eradicate the paralyzing and potentially deadly virus in one of the last countries where it is endemic.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - April 10, 2018 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Pakistan launches countrywide polio eradication drive
KARACHI, Pakistan (Reuters) - Pakistan launched a nationwide polio vaccination drive on Monday to try to reach 38.7 million children and eradicate the paralyzing and potentially deadly virus in one of the last countries where it is endemic. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Africa:New Malaria Drug Makes Human Blood Toxic to Mosquitoes
[Premium Times] There is a new ray of hope in the fight against Africa's most endemic killer, Malaria, as a new research discovers a pill that can make human blood poisonous to mosquitoes and even kill the blood-sucking insect. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 5, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Mefloquine effectively prevents malaria during pregnancy but is not well tolerated
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) The antimalarial drug mefloquine is more effective than the currently recommended treatment to prevent malaria infection in pregnant women living in endemic countries of sub-Saharan Africa, but the high frequency of adverse events represents a barrier to its use. These are the conclusions of a meta-analysis performed by ISGlobal -- a centre supported by the 'la Caixa' Foundation -- and published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, a leading journal in systematic reviews on health issues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

WHO recommends use of first typhoid conjugate vaccine
(Sabin Vaccine Institute) The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the introduction of typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV) for infants and children over six months of age in typhoid-endemic countries. This new policy will help ensure access to typhoid vaccination in communities most impacted by the disease, which is responsible for nearly 12 million infections and between 128,000 and 161,000 deaths a year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news