Polygenic Risk Scores for Coronary Artery Disease?

A risk-based prevention strategy is the most widely accepted approach to guide clinician-patient decision-making for prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD). According to this approach, the intensity of prevention efforts is matched to the estimated risk of the individual. American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines currently recommend pooled cohort equations for initial risk assessment, which integrate age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking status, and treatment for hypertension and diabetes to provide race- and sex-specific estimates of a broadly relevant end point of atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk (myocardial infarction, death from coronary heart disease, and fatal or nonfatal stroke). While risk assessment for CAD is known to be an imprecise estimate, no other tests of cardiovascular risk are uniformly agreed to enhance risk stratification. Thus, the search for additional and better risk markers continues to be a focus of cardiovascular research.
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research

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In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Hongfei Gu1†, Shuang Shao2†, Jie Liu3,4,5, Zhenqian Fan2, Yu Chen2, Jingxian Ni3,4,5, Conglin Wang6, Jun Tu3,4,5, Xianjia Ning3,4,5, Yongzhong Lou1*, Bin Li1* and Jinghua Wang3,4,5* 1Department of Neurology, Tianjin Haibin People's Hospital, Tianjin, China 2Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China 3Department of Neurology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, China 4Laboratory of Epidemiology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin, China 5Key Laboratory of Post-Neuroinjury Neuro-Repair and Regeneration i...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Intracranial artery calcification is common in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease and the intracranial carotid artery is most frequently affected. Intracranial arterial calcifications might be associated with imaging markers of SVD and are highly correlated with WMHs, lacunes, and CMBs. Quantification of calcification on CT provides additional information on the pathophysiology of SVD. Intracranial arterial calcification could act as a potential marker of SVD. Introduction Atherosclerosis is a systemic vascular process that is considered a major cause of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular di...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Embolism associated with asymptomatic carotid stenosis shows circadian variation with highest rates 4–6 h before midday. This corresponds with peak circadian incidence of stroke and other vascular complications. These and ASED Study results show that monitoring frequency, duration, and time of day are important in ES detection. Introduction Transcranial Doppler (TCD) detected microembolism in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) may help stratify the risk of stroke and other arterial disease complications in persons with advanced (≥60%) asymptomatic carotid stenosis. If so, this techniqu...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion Activation of the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant system plays an important role in cell defense against oxidative stress damage, whereas the insufficiency of the Nrf2 system is associated with multiple aspects of the genesis and progression of metabolic diseases, posing a great risk to the cardiovascular system (Figure 1). The systemic increase of Nrf2 activity by several activators may be beneficial in the treatment of metabolic diseases. In addition, selective upregulation of Nrf2 genes may represent a potential therapy in obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Looking to the future, experimental research that el...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
No one ever had fun visiting the cardiologist. ­Regardless of how good the doc might be, it’s always a little scary thinking about the health of something as fundamental as the heart. But there are ways to take greater control—to ensure that your own heart health is the best it can be—even if you have a family history of cardiovascular disease. Although 50% of cardiovascular-disease risk is genetic, the other 50% can be modified by how you live your life, according to Dr. Eugenia Gianos, director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “This means you can greatly ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Baby Boomer Health heart health Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 5 September 2018Source: Trends in Food Science &TechnologyAuthor(s): Teng Wang, Changhu Xue, Tiantian Zhang, Yuming WangABSTRACTHyperlipidemia with the characteristic of excessive blood lipid level is a risk factor for stroke, coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, diabetes, sudden death, and so on. Therefore, we should pay more attention to the dangers of hyperlipidemia and look for natural lipid-lowering ingredients to prevent and relieve hyperlipidemia. In recent years, various studies have shown that active ingredients from marine ...
Source: Trends in Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our study suggested that incident CHD was positively associated with plasma levels of titanium and arsenic, and inversely associated with selenium. Additional research is needed to confirm these findings in other populations. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1521 Received: 22 December 2016 Revised: 17 September 2017 Accepted: 19 September 2017 Published: 19 October 2017 Address correspondence to T. Wu, or A. Pan, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hongkong Rd., Wuhan 430030, Hubei, China. Telephone: +86-27-83692347. Email: wut@mails.tjmu.edu.cn or p...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusion This large pooled cohort study seems to demonstrate an association between a healthy plant-based diet and reduced risk of coronary heart disease, and an increased risk of heart disease with an unhealthy plant-based diet. This adds to the evidence base supporting the possible benefits of healthy plant-based diets in protecting against certain illnesses. However there are some limitations to the research: The cohort included only health professionals from the US so might not be representative of wider populations in the UK or elsewhere. The study can't provide information on the benefits or otherwise of this d...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news
In conclusion, the analyses do not permit us to predict the trajectory that maximum lifespans will follow in the future, and hence provide no support for their central claim that the maximum lifespan of humans is "fixed and subject to natural constraints". This is largely a product of the limited data available for analysis, owing to the challenges inherent in collecting and verifying the lifespans of extremely long-lived individuals. A reply from Jan Vijg's research group The authors of the accompanying comment disagree with our finding of a limit to human lifespan. Although we thank them for a...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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