Jungle yellow fever with positive serology for leptospira in a young peruvian male.

We report the case of a 20-year-old male from the department of Amazonas who presented with nine days of disease characterized by multiorgan failure (neurological, renal, hepatic, respiratory, and hematological involvement). He received antibiotic treatment, as well as, transfusion, dialysis, hemodynamic, and ventilatory support. Despite the severity of the clinical condition, he evolved favorably. YF was confirmed by Rt-PCR and positive serology was obtained for leptospira by ELISA and microagglutination. However, from a laboratory point of view, real co-infection by yellow fever and leptospira could not be demonstrated. This case of severe YF with non-fatal outcome emphasizes the importance of adequate syndromic diagnosis, and early and aggressive supportive treatment that can save a patient's life. PMID: 31967265 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Revista Peruana de Medicina de Experimental y Salud Publica - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica Source Type: research

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