The Cow That Could Feed the Planet
The cows in Farmer John’s pasture lead an idyllic life. They roam through tree-shaded meadows, tearing up mouthfuls of clover while nursing their calves in tranquility. Tawny brown, compact and muscular, they are Limousins, a breed known for the quality of its meat and much sought-after by the high-end restaurants and butchers in the nearby food mecca of Maastricht, in the southernmost province of the Netherlands. In a year or two, meat from these dozen cows could end up on the plates of Maastricht’s better-known restaurants, but the cows themselves are not headed for the slaughterhouse. Instead, every few mont...
Source: TIME: Science - November 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Aryn Baker/Maastricht, Netherlands Tags: Uncategorized climate change Climate Is Everything feature Innovation Magazine Source Type: news

It May Be Too Late to Find the Origin of COVID-19. The WHO Is Trying Anyway
Almost two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s still not clear exactly how, where or when the SARS-CoV-2 virus began infecting people. Many experts believe the virus jumped from animal hosts to humans, but researchers continue to investigate the possibility that it escaped from a laboratory. It’s not clear which, if either, of those theories is correct, and as time passes, the chances of finding a concrete answer grow slimmer. But on Oct. 13, the World Health Organization (WHO) unveiled a new effort to capitalize on whatever limited time remains: the Scientific Advisory Group for the Origins of Novel Pathoge...
Source: TIME: Health - October 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

How the hunt for this deadly virus shaped the search for coronavirus’s origins
Scientists quickly identified the deadly Nipah virus, tracing it to fruit bats. The detective story is taking on new relevance as scientists hunt for the origins of coronavirus and as zoonotic spillover is happening with increasing frequency, heightening the possibility of more pandemics in the future. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - October 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Karin Brulliard Source Type: news

Characterization of the variables related to reports of death due to canine bites in scientific articles during the years 2013-2017: a systematic review - Barrios CL, Aguirre-Olea V, Bustos-L ópez C, Pérez-Vergara S, Claros-Alegría S.
Canine bites are an important public health problem, with consequences such as physical injuries, psychological trauma, transmission of zoonoses, infections and they can even cause death. To avoid deaths caused by this type of bite, multiple factors relate... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 30, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Consumption of Wild Animal Meat Increases Risk of Zoonotic Diseases - UN Report
[The Herald] The taking of animals for wild meat consumption poses significant threats of spreading diseases from animals to humans such as coronavirus into the human population, according to a United Nations report released on Wednesday this week. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 16, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Africa: Eating Wild Meat Significantly Increases Zoonotic Disease Risk - UN Report
[UN News] The domestic consumption of meat from wild animals has significant impacts on most species protected under the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS), says a new report released on Wednesday, including increasing the risk of diseases spreading from animals to humans. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 16, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Guinea: Marburg in Guinea - the Value of Lessons From Managing Other Haemorrhagic Outbreaks
[The Conversation Africa] As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on in Africa amid insufficient vaccination rollout, viral haemorrhagic fever has again raised its head. This adds to public health turmoil on the continent where resources to respond to emerging and re-emerging epidemic prone zoonotic diseases remain limited. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 12, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Peridomestic Mammal Susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 Infection Peridomestic Mammal Susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 Infection
How susceptible are wild animals to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and what are the implications for preventing further zoonotic transmissions?Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 31, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

West Africa: The First Human Case of Marburg Virus in West Africa Is No Surprise - Here's Why
[The Conversation Africa] The first case of fatal Marburg virus disease was identified in Guinea, West Africa on 9 August 2021. Marburg is a highly infectious zoonotic haemorrhagic fever transmitted to people from fruit bats, specifically the Egyptian Rousette bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus). It spreads among humans through direct contact with the bodily fluids of infected people, surfaces and materials. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 31, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Why The Discovery Of Marburg Virus In West Africa Is A Concern
When zoonotic diseases spillover from wildlife into people it can be very difficult to tell whether what we observe is a singular event, one off and unlikely to lead to anything, or the tip of an iceberg. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 25, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John Drake, Contributor Tags: Science /science Innovation /innovation Healthcare /healthcare Source Type: news

Benefit-risk assessment of the French surveillance protocol of apparently healthy biting dogs and cats for human rabies prevention - Crozet G, Charmet T, Cliquet F, Robardet E, Dufour B, Rivi ère J.
In France, apparently healthy dogs and cats that bite humans must undergo an observation period of 15 days with three veterinary visits to ascertain that they remain healthy, indicating that no zoonotic transmission of rabies virus occurred via salivary pr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Senate Bill a Big Win for Health Workers around the Globe
By David Bryden, Director of the Frontline Health Workers Coalition and senior policy and advocacy advisor at IntraHealth International Photo of health workers in Mali by Nana Kofi Acquah for IntraHealth International. IntraHealth leads the secretariat for the Frontline Health Workers Coalition.August 05, 2021Even as the world is struggling to address COVID-19, we must plan and prepare for future pandemics. In fact, a recent estimate shows that the probability of a future zoonotic spillover event resulting in a pandemic of COVID-19 magnitude or larger is high: a 22-28% chance within the next ten years. W...
Source: IntraHealth International - August 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: Policy & Advocacy Global health security Health Workforce Systems Source Type: news

Protecting Plants Will Protect People and the Planet
By Barbara WellsROME, Jul 26 2021 (IPS) Back-to-back droughts followed by plagues of locusts have pushed over a million people in southern Madagascar to the brink of starvation in recent months. In the worst famine in half a century, villagers have sold their possessions and are eating the locusts, raw cactus fruits, and wild leaves to survive. Barbara WellsInstead of bringing relief, this year’s rains were accompanied by warm temperatures that created the ideal conditions for infestations of fall armyworm, which destroys mainly maize, one of the main food crops of sub-Saharan Africa. Drought and famine are not stra...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Barbara Wells Tags: Africa Biodiversity Climate Change COVID-19 Development & Aid Economy & Trade Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Food Sustainability Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Natural Re Source Type: news

AI used to predict unknown links between viruses and mammals
(University of Liverpool) A new University of Liverpool study could help scientists mitigate the future spread of zoonotic and livestock diseases caused by existing viruses.Researchers have used a form or artificial intelligence (AI) called machine-learning to predict more than 20,000 unknown associations between known viruses and susceptible mammalian species. The findings, which are published in Nature Communications, could be used to help target disease surveillance programmes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Southeast Asia and Food Price Inflation: Double Whammy
This article was first published by ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute as a commentary in Fulcrum.” With a link back to the original article — https://fulcrum.sg/southeast-asia-and-food-price-inflation-double-whammy/ Professor Paul Teng is an Associate Senior Fellow in the Climate Change in Southeast Asia Programme of ISEAS-Yusof Ishak institute. He is also Dean and Managing Director of NIE International, Nanyang Technological University Singapore.   Follow @IPSNewsUNBureau !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d....
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Paul Teng Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Climate Change Economy & Trade Environment Financial Crisis Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Food Sustainability Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

To Improve Global Health Security, We Must Not Abandon Tackling Existing Epidemics
Over 600 million people in Africa require treatment for an NTD, making up 35% of the global burden. Credit: Uniting to Combat NTDsBy Thoko Elphick-PooleyHOVE, United Kingdom, Jun 11 2021 (IPS) As world leaders come together in the UK for the G7, the global response to COVID-19 and how we can build a better defence system against infection is at the forefront of discussions.  Whilst we applaud the incredible global efforts in tackling COVID-19 and support calls for vaccines to be shared equitably across the world, we also urge G7 leaders not to abandon efforts to tackle existing epidemics such as neglected tropical dis...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Thoko Elphick Pooley Tags: Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) Source Type: news

The Guardian view on the Covid lab-leak theory: act on what we know | Editorial
This pandemic ’s precise origins may never be certain. We must address both zoonotic transmission risks and lab securityWhen something goes terribly wrong, it is human instinct to look for the human hand – perhaps to reassure ourselves that life is not wholly beyond our control. As the flu pandemic reached the US just over a century ago, someblamed German agents. So it wasn ’t surprising when people claimed that coronavirus had leaked from – or was even manufactured in –a laboratory in Wuhan, China, where the outbreak began. Nor was it surprising when Donald Trump and his allies promoted the s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Microbiology China Joe Biden Medical research Science World Health Organization US foreign policy Source Type: news

Preventing the Next Health Crisis Depends on Health Workers. We Need 18 Million More
Over 115,000 health and care workers died during the COVID-19 pandemic. As a physician who’s cared for patients with COVID-19, malaria and Ebola, I’ve seen too many colleagues make the ultimate sacrifice on the frontlines. I’m not surprised experts responding to TIME’s survey ranked bolstering the world’s public health workforce, particularly in rural and remote regions, as one of the top five of nearly 50 strategies to prepare for the next pandemic. But I’m concerned they ranked this the least feasible strategy amongst the top five. Experts ranked high the need for new systems to raise ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Raj Panjabi Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 health Magazine Source Type: news

Representations of free-living and unrestrained dogs as an emerging public health issue in Australian newspapers - Degeling C, Hall J, van Eeden LM, Finlay SM, Gurung SM, Brookes VJ.
That dogs can live and breed as free-living animals contributes to public health risks including zoonotic transmission, dog bites, and compromising people's sense of safety in public spaces. In Australia, free-living dog populations are comprised of domest... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Consideration of Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases Consideration of Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
This study suggests that while the prevalence of vector-borne and zoonotic diseases is on the rise in the U.S., they are often misdiagnosed and underreported by healthcare practitioners.Southern Medical Journal (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Journal Article Source Type: news

Study offers insights for communicating about wildlife, zoonotic disease amid COVID-19
(North Carolina State University) A new study from North Carolina State University found that certain types of messages could influence how people perceive information about the spread of diseases from wildlife to humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Future Pandemic? Consider Radically Altering Animal Agriculture Practices
(Florida Atlantic University) Almost three-quarters of emerging infectious diseases are spread between animals and people. COVID-19 is the latest and most impactful zoonotic event of the modern era. Researchers offer three plausible solutions to mitigate zoonotic risk associated with intensive animal agriculture. They explore incentivizing plant-based and cell-based animal source food alternatives through government subsidies, disincentivizing intensive animal source food production through the adoption of a " zoonotic tax, " and eliminating intensive animal source food production through a total ban. (Source: Eu...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 2, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Jane Goodall: If We Don’t Make Peace With Nature, Expect More Deadly Pandemics
The famed primatologist spent the quarantine broadcasting to the world about the threat of climate change, zoonotic disease and biodiversity loss. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 28, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why Our Best Defence Against Future Pandemics is Data
Scientists in Thailand work to combat zoonotic diseases at their source. The COVID-19 pandemic demonstrates “intimate” linkages between the health of humans, animals and ecosystems, as zoonotic diseases spread between animals and people, the World Health Organization (WHO) chief said February 21. Credit: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) via UN NewsBy Andy PetersEDINBURGH, Scotland, May 24 2021 (IPS) Although the World Health Organization’s (WHO) mission to discover its origins has proven inconclusive, the Covid-19 pandemic has nonetheless clearly highlighted the need for better care, atten...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Andy Peters Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Chinese military tied to Pentagon-funded virus research center that manufactures biological weapons
(Natural News) A close examination of Chinese-language documents and scientific publications has revealed that the Pentagon and the Chinese military have been working together to develop biological weapons such as the Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19). The Military Veterinary Research Institute and the Institute of Zoonotic Diseases in Changchun, Jilin Province, China, led by People’s Liberation Army... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer review – the gobsmacking truth about vaccines
Want a booster shot of knowledge? David Olusoga and Steven Johnson ’s new show will teach you about the magic, and the horrors, behind the medical breakthroughs of our timeIn 1900, the average global life expectancy was 32. Today, a tiny blink of historical time later, it ’s twice that. In a developed country, you will most likely live to see your grandchildren and can hope not unreasonably to see a great-grandson or daughter, too. The new four-part series Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer (BBC Four), presented byhistorian David Olusoga and US science writer Steven Johnson, explores how a handful of ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Lucy Mangan Tags: Television & radio Culture Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Race World news Slavery History of science Medical research Coronavirus Infectious diseases Source Type: news

COVID-19's Origins Need Further Investigation, Say Scientists
A letter signed by 18 researchers argues that hypotheses about zoonotic spillover or accidental lab release both "remain viable" in the absence of additional evidence. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 14, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Timing the SARS-CoV-2 index case in Hubei province
Understanding when severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged is critical to evaluating our current approach to monitoring novel zoonotic pathogens and understanding the failure of early containment and mitigation efforts for COVID-19. We used a coalescent framework to combine retrospective molecular clock inference with forward epidemiological simulations to determine how long SARS-CoV-2 could have circulated before the time of the most recent common ancestor of all sequenced SARS-CoV-2 genomes. Our results define the period between mid-October and mid-November 2019 as the plausible interval when...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Pekar, J., Worobey, M., Moshiri, N., Scheffler, K., Wertheim, J. O. Tags: Epidemiology, Evolution reports Source Type: news

Systematic review: comparison of the main variables of interest in publications of canine bite accidents in the written press, gray and scientific literature in Chile and Spain, between the years 2013 and 2017 - Barrios CL, Aguirre V, Parra A, Pavletic C, Bustos-L ópez C, Pérez S, Urrutia C, Ramirez J, Fatjó J.
Dog bites are a major public health problem, with consequences such as physical injury, psychological trauma, transmission of zoonoses, infections, and economic costs. For this reason, it is necessary to develop preventive programs, which require quality i... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Ranking virus spillover risk
(University of California - Davis) SpillOver, a new web application developed by scientists at the University of California, Davis, and contributed to by experts from all over the world, ranks the risk of wildlife-to-human spillover for newly-discovered viruses. SpillOver, linked to a new study in PNAS, is the first open-source risk assessment tool that evaluates wildlife viruses to estimate their zoonotic spillover and pandemic potential. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 5, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A diversity of wildlife is good for our health
(Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies) A growing body of evidence suggests that biodiversity loss increases our exposure to both new and established zoonotic pathogens. Restoring and protecting nature is essential to preventing future pandemics. So reports a new Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) paper that synthesizes current understanding about how biodiversity affects human health and provides recommendations for future research to guide management. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 5, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Factors that may predict next pandemic
(University of Sydney) New modelling identifies country-specific human and human-influenced environmental factors associated with disease outbreaks. A country's land area, human population density, and area of forest are associated with zoonotic diseases, like COVID-19. Human development index, average annual temperature, and health expenditure predict other kinds of disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 29, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Disease outbreaks more likely in deforestation areas, study finds
Tree-planting can also increase health risks if it focuses too narrowly on small number of species, paper saysOutbreaks of infectious diseases are more likely in areas of deforestation and monoculture plantations, according to a study that suggests epidemics are likely to increase as biodiversity declines.Land use change is a significant factor in the emergence of zoonotic viruses such as Covid-19 and vector-borne ailments such as malaria, saysthe paper, published on Wednesday in Frontiers in Veterinary Science.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jonathan Watts Tags: Deforestation Trees and forests Biodiversity Environment Infectious diseases Science World news Source Type: news

Recurrent deletions in the SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein drive antibody escape
Zoonotic pandemics, such as that caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), can follow the spillover of animal viruses into highly susceptible human populations. The descendants of these viruses have adapted to the human host and evolved to evade immune pressure. Coronaviruses acquire substitutions more slowly than other RNA viruses. In the spike glycoprotein, we found that recurrent deletions overcome this slow substitution rate. Deletion variants arise in diverse genetic and geographic backgrounds, transmit efficiently, and are present in novel lineages, including those of current global conc...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: McCarthy, K. R., Rennick, L. J., Nambulli, S., Robinson-McCarthy, L. R., Bain, W. G., Haidar, G., Duprex, W. P. Tags: Virology reports Source Type: news

Legal wildlife trade needs monitoring to reduce risk of a new pandemic
(Oxford Brookes University) The illegal wildlife trade is often seen as one of the major gateways to zoonotic diseases, that spread from animals to humans. While the illegal trade in tigers, ivory, rhino horn, pangolins and primates is of paramount concern for public health, Professor Nijman says the legal wildlife trade should be of equal concern. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 4, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Agents of food-borne zoonoses confirmed to parasitise newly-recorded in Thailand snails
(Pensoft Publishers) Parasitic flatworms known as agents of food-borne zoonoses were confirmed to use several species of thiarid snails, commonly found in freshwater and brackish environments in southeast Asia, as their first intermediate host. These parasites can cause severe ocular infections in humans who consume raw or improperly cooked fish that have fed on parasitised snails. The study, conducted in South Thailand, is published in the peer-reviewed open-access journalZoosystematics and Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The adoption of the One Health approach to improve surveillance of venomous animal injury, vector-borne and zoonotic diseases in Foz do Igua çu, Brazil - Leandro AS, Lopes RD, Martins CA, Rivas AV, da Silva I, Galvão SR, Maciel-de-Freitas R.
Public health institutions with sectorized structure and low integration among field teams, old-fashioned practices such as paper-based storage system, and poorly qualified health agents have limited ability to conduct accurate surveillance and design effe... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Non-Human Animals and Insects Source Type: news

Broad and potent activity against SARS-like viruses by an engineered human monoclonal antibody
The recurrent zoonotic spillover of coronaviruses (CoVs) into the human population underscores the need for broadly active countermeasures. We employed a directed evolution approach to engineer three severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) antibodies for enhanced neutralization breadth and potency. One of the affinity-matured variants, ADG-2, displays strong binding activity to a large panel of sarbecovirus receptor binding domains and neutralizes representative epidemic sarbecoviruses with high potency. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that ADG-2 employs a distinct angle of approach to r...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Rappazzo, C. G., Tse, L. V., Kaku, C. I., Wrapp, D., Sakharkar, M., Huang, D., Deveau, L. M., Yockachonis, T. J., Herbert, A. S., Battles, M. B., OBrien, C. M., Brown, M. E., Geoghegan, J. C., Belk, J., Peng, L., Yang, L., Hou, Y., Scobey, T. D., Burton, Tags: Immunology, Microbiology r-articles Source Type: news

Strengthen ‘One Health approach’ to prevent future pandemics – WHO chief
The COVID-19 pandemic demonstrates “intimate” linkages between the health of humans, animals and ecosystems, as zoonotic diseases spread between animals and people, the World Health Organization (WHO) chief said on Wednesday.  (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - February 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mosaic nanoparticles elicit cross-reactive immune responses to zoonotic coronaviruses in mice
Protection against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and SARS-related emergent zoonotic coronaviruses is urgently needed. We made homotypic nanoparticles displaying the receptor binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 or co-displaying SARS-CoV-2 RBD along with RBDs from animal betacoronaviruses that represent threats to humans (mosaic nanoparticles with four to eight distinct RBDs). Mice immunized with RBD nanoparticles, but not soluble antigen, elicited cross-reactive binding and neutralization responses. Mosaic RBD nanoparticles elicited antibodies with superior cross-reactive recognition of heterol...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Cohen, A. A., Gnanapragasam, P. N. P., Lee, Y. E., Hoffman, P. R., Ou, S., Kakutani, L. M., Keeffe, J. R., Wu, H.-J., Howarth, M., West, A. P., Barnes, C. O., Nussenzweig, M. C., Bjorkman, P. J. Tags: Immunology, Virology reports Source Type: news

Fighting zoonotic coronaviruses
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Immunology, Virology twis Source Type: news

Nothing to Learn from East Asia?
By Jomo Kwame SundaramKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Jan 19 2021 (IPS) Covid-19 infection and death rates in the Western world and many developing countries in Asia and Latin America have long overtaken East Asia since the second quarter of 2020. Perhaps unsurprisingly, considering prevailing Western accounts of the Asian financial crises, there have been no serious efforts to draw policy lessons from East Asian contagion containment. Jomo Kwame SundaramLockdowns necessary? Although most East Asian economies have successfully contained the pandemic without nationwide ‘stay in shelter lockdowns’, many governments have...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Asia-Pacific Economy & Trade Financial Crisis Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Epidemiology of dog bite incidents in Chile: factors related to the patterns of human-dog relationship - Barrios CL, Bustos-L ópez C, Pavletic C, Parra A, Vidal M, Bowen J, Fatjó J.
Dog bites are one of the main public health problems. They produce important consequences for those who suffer them (physical and psychological injuries, secondary infections, sequelae, risk of transmission of zoonoses and surgeries, among others). The o... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

An epidemiological study of the clinico-social profile of animal bite patients attending the anti-rabies clinic of a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi - Panda M, Kapoor R, Ramesh V.
BACKGROUND: Rabies is a zoonotic disease caused by the rabies virus (RABV). Annually about 59,000 persons die of rabies, of which 20,000 are from India alone. Rabies though 100% fatal is preventable with post-exposure prophylaxis which includes wound washi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

‘ We Might Have a Covid-21 or Covid-22 Coming Our Way ’
The World Health Organization (WHO) is working closely with global experts, governments and partners to rapidly expand scientific knowledge on this new virus, to track the spread and virulence of the virus, and to provide advice to countries and individuals on measures to protect health and prevent the spread of this outbreak. Credit: WHOBy Cristián SamperNEW YORK, Dec 23 2020 (IPS) Cristián Samper is working for the Wildlife Conservation Society, an organization that concerns itself with the health of wildlife all over the globe. And he warned –even before the Covid-19 pandemic – about the danger...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Cristian Samper Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Peace Sustainability TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Fighting the menace of zoonoses
(Hokkaido University) Hokkaido University is pleased to announce the publication of 'Tackling Global Issues Vol. 3 FIGHTING THE MENACE OF ZOONOSES,' a magazine featuring the University's research on zoonotic and other infectious diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 23, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Preexisting and de novo humoral immunity to SARS-CoV-2 in humans
Zoonotic introduction of novel coronaviruses may encounter preexisting immunity in humans. Using diverse assays for antibodies recognizing SARS-CoV-2 proteins, we detected preexisting humoral immunity. SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (S)–reactive antibodies were detectable using a flow cytometry–based method in SARS-CoV-2–uninfected individuals and were particularly prevalent in children and adolescents. They were predominantly of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) class and targeted the S2 subunit. By contrast, SARS-CoV-2 infection induced higher titers of SARS-CoV-2 S–reactive IgG antibodies targeting both ...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ng, K. W., Faulkner, N., Cornish, G. H., Rosa, A., Harvey, R., Hussain, S., Ulferts, R., Earl, C., Wrobel, A. G., Benton, D. J., Roustan, C., Bolland, W., Thompson, R., Agua-Doce, A., Hobson, P., Heaney, J., Rickman, H., Paraskevopoulou, S., Houlihan, C. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Risks of invasive and alien predator species for health and ecology
(Goethe University Frankfurt) The raccoon, raccoon dog, mink and golden jackal are not native to Europe, but are increasingly spreading there. The joint research project ZOWIAC, 'Zoonotic and ecological effects on wildlife of invasive carnivores' by Goethe University and the Senckenberg Society for Nature Research will study how these invasive and alien species threaten biological diversity and which diseases they can transmit to humans and animals. The project is mainly funded by the German Federal Environmental Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cutting UK overseas aid could harm the fight against future pandemics | Matthew Baylis and Fiona Tomley
In our age of emerging pathogens, funding for global research into zoonotic diseases such as Covid-19, Ebola and Sars is vitalCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThis year, we ’ve seen how a previously unknown animal virus can spill over into the human population in one country, pass rapidly between people, and spread across the world in days. With nearly1.5m reported deaths from Covid-19, the virus is a startling indication of how the health of the world ’s human population is inseparable from animals and the environment that we share with them.Treating health in a way that recogn...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Baylis and Fiona Tomley Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Infectious diseases Microbiology Science Health World news Society Medical research Ebola Sars Aid UK news Source Type: news

Enhanced Zika virus susceptibility of globally invasive Aedes aegypti populations
The drivers and patterns of zoonotic virus emergence in the human population are poorly understood. The mosquito Aedes aegypti is a major arbovirus vector native to Africa that invaded most of the world’s tropical belt over the past four centuries, after the evolution of a "domestic" form that specialized in biting humans and breeding in water storage containers. Here, we show that human specialization and subsequent spread of A. aegypti out of Africa were accompanied by an increase in its intrinsic ability to acquire and transmit the emerging human pathogen Zika virus. Thus, the recent evolution and global...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Aubry, F., Dabo, S., Manet, C., Filipovic, I., Rose, N. H., Miot, E. F., Martynow, D., Baidaliuk, A., Merkling, S. H., Dickson, L. B., Crist, A. B., Anyango, V. O., Romero-Vivas, C. M., Vega-Rua, A., Dusfour, I., Jiolle, D., Paupy, C., Mayanja, M. N., Lut Tags: Microbiology reports Source Type: news