'Why wait for it?' How to predict a pandemic
Strides are being made towards an open access atlas that could predict where dangerous animal-borne viruses will next appearHow do you predict where a deadly tropical disease such as Ebola, possibly the most virulent in the world, will appear next? Since it first emerged in a small town on the edge of a Congolese forest, it has broken out in seven other African countries, often thousands of miles apart.Sometimes it has spilled out of remote rainforest and then disappeared for years. Other times it has turned up in cities, baffling world bodies and governments that can only try to respond as fast as possible. But actually, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: John Vidal Tags: Infectious diseases Ebola Zika virus Coronavirus outbreak Microbiology Medical research Science World news Animals Farming Environment Climate change Source Type: news

A cross sectional study to assess the knowledge and response to dog bite among the urban and rural population of Hubballi taluk - Godbole M, Joshi AR, Bant DD.
BACKGROUND: Rabies is a fatal zoonotic disease of the central nervous system, most commonly caused by the bite of rabid dogs. Globally canine rabies causes 59,000 human deaths, over 3.7 million DALYs and 8.6 billion USD economic losses annually. These loss... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Epidemiological profile of animal bite patients attending emergency department at a tertiary care health facility in a northern hilly Indian city - Kumar S, Gupta A, Sachdeva A, Chaudhary A, Chamotra S.
BACKGROUND: Rabies is a highly infectious zoonotic disease with a high case fatality rate. In India, approximately 20,000 deaths among 17.4 million exposed people occur every year. The data on animal bites is scarce and unreliable due to poor surveillance ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

More Covid-19-like viruses to come, warns Oxford professor
Sarah Gilbert, the lead expert behind Oxford University's Covid vaccine, said modern lifestyles, intense farming and deforestation drove up the risk of outbreaks of zoonotic infections. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Using surveillance of animal bite patients to decipher potential risks of rabies exposure from domestic animals and wildlife in Brazil - Benavides JA, Megid J, Campos A, Hampson K.
Direct contact with domestic animals and wildlife is linked to zoonotic spillover risk. Patients presenting with animal-bite injuries provide a potentially valuable source of surveillance data on rabies viruses that are transmitted primarily by animal bite... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Rise in Babesiosis Cases, Pennsylvania, USA, 2005-2018 Rise in Babesiosis Cases, Pennsylvania, USA, 2005-2018
In light of the emergence of babesiosis in the state of Pennsylvania, clinicians should be aware of the signs and symptoms of this zoonotic disease.Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - August 12, 2020 Category: Pathology Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Disrupted Habitats Have More Zoonotic Disease Hosts: Study
Animals that can host pathogens dangerous to humans, such as rodents, birds, and bats, are proportionately more common in human-occupied spaces than in remote areas. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 6, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Africa: The One Health Approach to Preventing the Next Pandemic
[AfricaFocus] Editor's Note: "COVID-19 is just one example of the rising trend of diseases - from Ebola to MERS to West Nile and Rift Valley fevers - caused by viruses that have jumped from animal hosts into the human population. ... The rising trend in zoonotic diseases is driven by the degradation of our natural environment - through land degradation, wildlife exploitation, resource extraction, climate change, and other stresses." - Press release from UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and International Livestock Re (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 3, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Inside the Global Quest to Trace the Origins of COVID-19 —and Predict Where It Will Go Next
It wasn’t greed, or curiosity, that made Li Rusheng grab his shotgun and enter Shitou Cave. It was about survival. During Mao-era collectivization of the early 1970s, food was so scarce in the emerald valleys of southwestern China’s Yunnan province that farmers like Li could expect to eat meat only once a year–if they were lucky. So, craving protein, Li and his friends would sneak into the cave to hunt the creatures they could hear squeaking and fluttering inside: bats. Li would creep into the gloom and fire blindly at the vaulted ceiling, picking up any quarry that fell to the ground, while his companion...
Source: TIME: Health - July 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell/ Yuxi, Yunnan and Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Clear strategies needed to reduce bushmeat hunting
(Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology) Extensive wildlife trade not only threatens species worldwide but can also lead to the transmission of zoonotic diseases. An international research team led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research shed new light on the motivations why people hunt, trade or consume different species. The research shows that more differentiated solutions are needed to prevent uncontrolled disease emergence and species decline. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Africa: Africa Can Lead Fight Against Future Pandemics
[UNEP] Nairobi -- As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to take lives and disrupt economies across the world, a new report warns that further outbreaks will emerge unless governments take active measures to prevent other zoonotic diseases from crossing into the human population, and sets out ten recommendations to prevent future pandemics. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 10, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Africa: How to Prevent Future Pandemics - Stop Spread of Viruses From Animals
[UNEP] Ebola, SARS, Zika, HIV/AIDS, West Nile fever and now COVID-19. These are some of the highest-profile diseases to emerge in the last several decades. And while they emerged in different parts of the world, they have one thing in common. They are what scientists call "zoonotic diseases," infections that jump between animals and humans, some of which leave illness and death in their wake. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 10, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Where did the Asian longhorned ticks in the US come from?
(Rutgers University) The invasive population of Asian longhorned ticks in the United States likely began with three or more self-cloning females from northeastern Asia, according to a Rutgers-led study. Asian longhorned ticks outside the U.S. can carry debilitating diseases. In the United States and elsewhere they can threaten livestock and pets. The new study, published in the journal Zoonoses and Public Health, sheds new light on the origin of these exotic ticks and how they are spreading across the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New UN report outlines ways to curb growing spread of animal-to-human diseases
As the battle against COVID-19 rages, the world can expect to see other diseases that pass from animals to humans emerge, according to a new UN report launched on Monday, which maintains that there is still time to head off potential zoonotic pandemics. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - July 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Essential Vocab For COVID-19: From Asymptomatic To Zoonotic
The pandemic has brought many new terms into daily usage. Here are definitions of some of the words used in discussion of the novel coronavirus and how to stem its spread.(Image credit: Angela Hsieh for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pien Huang Source Type: news

How Deforestation Helps Deadly Viruses Jump from Animals to Humans
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post How Deforestation Helps Deadly Viruses Jump from Animals to Humans appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Environment Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Environmental DNA detection could cut pathogens in pet trade
(Washington State University) As the SARS-CoV-2 puts new focus on zoonotic pathogens, a Washington State University researcher has developed a method to use environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect disease in the vast international trade of aquatic animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Causes Pyogenic Granulomas?
Discussion Pyogenic granuloma (PG) is a benign, vascular lesion of the skin. PGs are red, small, often pedunculated nodules that can rapidly increase in size (up to 1-2 cm). They also can often ulcerate and bleed. They frequently occur on the head and neck, with back and chest being the next most common locations but can occur in other locations. They usually are solitary and do not regress. They are seen in children (mean age 6.7 years), young adults and pregnant women (5%). Treatment is electrocautery or excision. Learning Point PG’s cause is not fully understood. A gene has recently been identified with PG sugge...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 15, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Coronavirus spread by asymptomatic people 'appears to be rare,' WHO official says
The spread of Covid-19 by someone who is not showing symptoms appears to be rare, Maria Van Kerkhove, the World Health Organization's technical lead for coronavirus response and head of the emerging diseases and zoonoses unit, said during a media briefing in Geneva on Monday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nigeria: COVID-19 Threatens to Hit Fragile Northeastern States Hardest - UNDP Studies
[Africa Renewal] The arrival of COVID-19 in Nigeria sparked a cascade of crises, but the pandemic poses its greatest threat in the impoverished, fragile northeast of Africa's largest country, according to a new UNDP assessment. There, Borno, Adamawa, and Yobe states comprise "one of the most pronounced, multi-faceted, and complex humanitarian and development crises known to the international community today," UNDP's 2018 Nigeria Human Development report found--more than two years before the zoonotic pathogen we now know as (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 9, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Nigeria: COVID-19 Threatens to Hit Fragile States Hardest - Studies
[Africa Renewal] The arrival of COVID-19 in Nigeria sparked a cascade of crises, but the pandemic poses its greatest threat in the impoverished, fragile northeast of Africa's largest country, according to a new UNDP assessment. There, Borno, Adamawa, and Yobe states comprise "one of the most pronounced, multi-faceted, and complex humanitarian and development crises known to the international community today," UNDP's 2018 Nigeria Human Development report found--more than two years before the zoonotic pathogen we now know as (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 9, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Coronavirus spread by people with no symptoms 'appears to be rare,' WHO official says
The spread of Covid-19 by someone who is not showing symptoms appears to be rare, Maria Van Kerkhove, the World Health Organization's technical lead for coronavirus response and head of the emerging diseases and zoonoses unit, said during a media briefing in Geneva on Monday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AIBS Responding to COVID-19 Crisis
During the COVID-19 crisis, AIBS has continued to support our clients, partners, and members in our collective efforts to promote informed decision-making that advances science for the benefit of society. We continue to work to help the biological sciences community respond the effects of disruptions arising from COVID-19, and to prepare for continued impact and effectiveness as we all prepare for new models of operation. AIBS is proud to have: Helped science educators identify and develop resources to enable science instruction to continue in online formats. Worked with research funding organizations to supp...
Source: AIBS News - June 8, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

2nd World Food Safety Day
By Dr Renata ClarkeROME, Jun 8 2020 (IPS) Few things are as natural and as necessary as eating food. However, if food producers, food processors, food handlers and consumers do not follow good food safety practices, food can become contaminated and rather than nourishing us and bringing us pleasure it can make us sick or even kill us. According to World Health Organization (WHO) Statistics, the public health burden of unsafe food is very high: in 2015 they estimated that over 600 million people fall ill and 420 000 die every year from foodborne diseases. It was at the launching of the WHO 2015 Report on the Burden of Food...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Dr Renata Clarke Tags: Economy & Trade Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Food Sustainability Global Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Natural Resources TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

COVID-19 Is a Symptom of a Bigger Problem: Our Planet ’s Ailing Health
The COVID-19 outbreak is a global tragedy. Hundreds of thousands have died, healthcare systems are buckling, and the future is uncertain for millions of people whose livelihoods are collapsing. It is absolutely right that the focus today is on saving lives here and now. In the same spirit of doing what we can to safeguard people’s wellbeing, we must not content ourselves with containing the acute crisis. We must also look ahead to what we can learn from this crisis to prevent future risks. COVID-19 is a reminder of how vulnerable even our modern, technologically advanced societies are. The biggest lesson is that COVI...
Source: TIME: Health - June 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Inger Andersen and Johan Rockström Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

COVID-19 Is a Symptom of a Bigger Problem: Our Planet ’s Ailing Health
The COVID-19 outbreak is a global tragedy. Hundreds of thousands have died, healthcare systems are buckling, and the future is uncertain for millions of people whose livelihoods are collapsing. It is absolutely right that the focus today is on saving lives here and now. In the same spirit of doing what we can to safeguard people’s wellbeing, we must not content ourselves with containing the acute crisis. We must also look ahead to what we can learn from this crisis to prevent future risks. COVID-19 is a reminder of how vulnerable even our modern, technologically advanced societies are. The biggest lesson is that COVI...
Source: TIME: Science - June 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Inger Andersen and Johan Rockström Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Africa: What Zoologists Should Learn From a Zoonotic Pandemic
[The Conversation Africa] Zoology has an illustrious history; it has triggered paradigm shifts in thinking. One of the best known was Darwin's theory of evolution, based on his observations of the natural world. It became the cornerstone of current zoological research. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 5, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Beyond the COVID-19 Pandemic: What Now?
WHO delivered medical supplies to fight the COVID-19 pandemic in the Republic of Congo in April 2020. Credit: World Health Organization (WHO)By Lawrence SurendraBANGKOK, Thailand, Jun 4 2020 (IPS) In the midst of the COVID 19 pandemic, the much-anticipated 73rd World Health Assembly (WHA) of the WHO concluded without any major controversies or disagreements. The landmark WHA resolution to bring the world together to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, co-sponsored by more than 130 countries, and adopted by consensus, called for the intensification of efforts to control the pandemic, and for equitable access to and fair distribut...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Lawrence Surendra Tags: Aid Climate Change Development & Aid Environment Featured Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Flying foxes in SA exposed to zoonotic viruses
(University of Adelaide) University of Adelaide researchers have found that South Australia's population of Grey-headed flying foxes, which took up residence in 2010, has been exposed to a number of viruses, including Hendra virus that can be transmitted to humans via horses. But they have not found evidence of exposure to Australian bat lyssavirus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 11, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

COVID-19 & Human Health Risks Linked to Wildlife Trade Practices
An animal market in Indonesia. Credit: TRAFFICBy Steven BroadCAMBRIDGE, UK, May 7 2020 (IPS) At the time of writing, the COVID-19 pandemic is raging worldwide, causing human mortality and socio-economic disruption on a massive scale and it appears highly likely that profound impacts will continue for many years to come. Although the precise origins of the disease remain unproven, there are strong indications of a wild animal source and a direct link to wildlife trade in China. Even if evidence points elsewhere in future, the magnitude of the current outbreak places under an intense spotlight concerns raised by zoonotic d...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Steven Broad Tags: Civil Society Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Detection of Zoonotic Bartonella Pathogens in Rabbit Fleas Detection of Zoonotic Bartonella Pathogens in Rabbit Fleas
What can the identification of bartonella pathogens in wild rabbit fleas tell us about the transmission of fleaborne zoonoses?Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

What Does Covid-19 Crisis Mean for Rural Development?
David Lewis is professor of social policy and development at the London School of Economics & Political Science By David LewisLONDON, Apr 22 2020 (IPS) The implications and consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic are playing out before us. Much of the news coverage of the to date in both the Global North and the Global South has understandably focused on the horrifying impact of the disease on urban communities, where it is clearly hitting people, and economies, hardest. David LewisBut what are the implications for people in rural areas, where just under a half of the world’s population live, and where the largest...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David Lewis Tags: Aid Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

We Need to Rethink Our Food System to Prevent the Next Pandemic
Once a dangerous new pathogen is out, as we are seeing, it can be difficult if not impossible to prevent it going global. One as contagious as SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to infect the whole of humanity. Eighty per cent of cases may be benign, but with such a large pool of susceptible hosts, the numbers who experience severe illness and die can still be shockingly high. So the only sensible answer to the question, how do we stop this from happening again, is: by doing all we can to prevent such pathogens infecting humans in the first place. And that means taking a long, hard look at our relationship with the natural world...
Source: TIME: Health - April 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Spinney Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Africa: Six Nature Facts Related to Coronaviruses
[UNEP] Did you know that 60 per cent of all emerging infectious diseases in humans are zoonotic, in other words they come to us via animals? (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 9, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Want to Stop the Next Pandemic? Start Protecting Wildlife Habitats
(Bloomberg) — There are four critical facets of pandemic prevention, according to Lee Hannah, senior scientist at Conservation International. Three of them make immediate sense against the backdrop of our current emergency: stockpile masks and respirators; have testing infrastructure ready; and ban the global wildlife trade, including the open animal markets where COVID-19 may have first infected people. His fourth recommendation is more grandiose: “Take care of nature.” The assault on ecosystems that allowed COVID-19 to jump from animals to humans went far beyond merchants hunting and selling rare wildli...
Source: TIME: Science - April 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Eric Roston / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news

Ban wildlife markets to avert pandemics, says UN biodiversity chief
Warning comes as destruction of nature increasingly seen as key driver of zoonotic diseasesSee all our coronavirus coverageCoronavirus latest: at a glanceThe United Nations ’ biodiversity chief has called for a global ban on wildlife markets – such as the one in Wuhan, China, believed to be the starting point of the coronavirus outbreak – to prevent future pandemics.Elizabeth Maruma Mrema,the acting executive secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity, said countries should move to prevent future pandemics by banning “wet markets” that sell live and dead animals for human consumpti...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 6, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Greenfield Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Environment Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Animals Food China Wildlife United Nations Source Type: news

AIBS Testimony: Support Increased Funding for Science
The American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) has provided testimony to House and Senate Appropriations Committees regarding fiscal year (FY) 2021 funding for the National Science Foundation and biological research programs within the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). AIBS urged Congress to reject the deep cuts proposed in the President’s budget request and to continue its bipartisan tradition of investing in our nation’s scientific capacity. In testimony to the House and Senate Appropri...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 17, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Don ’t Blame China. The Next Pandemic Could Come from Anywhere
The northern side of Chatuchak Weekend Market feels a bit like Noah has hit hard times and decided to offload the entire contents of his Ark. In wooden cages, bright-plumed fighting cocks squawk and peck. Around the corner are snakes in plastic takeout containers, prices scrawled on them in sharpie. Hairless squirrel kits snooze in a pile as a meerkat and giant iguana gaze on. A pygmy monkey leaps about with a furious scowl, perhaps indignant at the 30,000 baht ($950) price tag fixed to his enclosure. Across the narrow alleyway, a lynx prowls restlessly within its cage. “He’s 250,000 baht [$7,900],” says ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell / Bangkok Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk overnight Source Type: news

USDA Research, Forest Service Facing Cuts Under President's Budget
Under the President’s Budget Request, which was released on February 10, 2020, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) would operate at $23.4 billion in fiscal year (FY) 2021, $3.8 billion below the level enacted by Congress for FY 2020. The proposed budget for research, education, and economics at USDA is $3.2 billion, 4.4 percent below the FY 2020 level. The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) conducts intramural research in the areas of natural and biological science. It would receive $1.4 billion in FY 2021, $189 million below FY 2020. Funding for seven out of eight research areas within ARS would decrease, r...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 2, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Key terms of the coronavirus outbreak, explained: From asymptomatic to zoonotic
To understand covid-19, it helps to know what these words and phrases mean. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: William Wan Source Type: news

Global Surveillance for COVID-19 Disease Caused by Human Infection with Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19): Interim Guidance
The objectives of this global surveillance are to monitor trends of the disease where human-to-human and/or zoonotic transmission occurs; rapidly detect new cases in countries where the virus is not circulating; provide epidemiological information to conduct risk assessment at the national, regional, and global level; and provide epidemiological information to guide response measures. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coronavirus came from bats or possibly pangolins amid ‘acceleration’ of new zoonotic infections
Disease detectives are desperate to find out what animal gave this virus to humans, and when and how. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joel Achenbach Source Type: news

Global Surveillance for Human Infection with Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19): Interim Guidance
The objectives of this global surveillance are to monitor trends of the disease where human-to-human and/or zoonotic transmission occurs; rapidly detect new cases in countries where the virus is not circulating; provide epidemiological information to conduct risk assessment at the national, regional, and global level; and provide epidemiological information to guide response measures. This page also provides links to a template for line listing in Excel format, and data dictionary in Excel format in English, Chinese, French, and Russian. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

European Union Summary Report on Antimicrobial Resistance in Zoonotic and Indicator Bacteria from Humans, Animals and Food in 2017/2018
Source: European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Published: 1/31/2020. Salmonella and campylobacter are becoming increasingly resistant to ciprofloxacin, one of the antibiotics of choice for treating infections caused by these bacteria. That conclusion is part of this 166-page report on antimicrobial resistance in zoonoses, released with the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which also presents some positive trends in the animal sector and includes key outcome indicators that will help European Union Member States assess their progress in reducing the use of antimicrobials and combat...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

2019-nCoV: Just a Stop on the Zoonotic Highway 2019-nCoV: Just a Stop on the Zoonotic Highway
The history of recent zoonotic viral outbreaks informs the current Wuhan coronavirus outbreak.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - January 30, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

The West Blames the Wuhan Coronavirus on China ’s Love of Eating Wild Animals. The Truth Is More Complex
This reporter was once served slices of sashimi still attached to the carcass of a gasping fish.) Eating wild animals is also considered a luxury because of their rarity and cost, much like game is in the West. Some practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine also believe that eating exotic creatures can cure certain ailments and boost “male potency.” “This is just part of Chinese culture,” says Yanzhong Huang, a public heath expert at the Council for Foreign Relations. “They love to eat anything alive.” Wild animals are, of course, especially problematic because their murky provenienc...
Source: TIME: Health - January 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell / Wuhan, China Tags: Uncategorized China Infectious Disease onetime overnight Source Type: news

Logan Airport Not Currently Screening Passengers For Coronavirus
BOSTON (CBS/CNN) – A new Chinese coronavirus, a cousin of the SARS virus, has infected more than 200 people since the outbreak began in Wuhan, China, in December. Boston’s Logan Airport is not currently screening passengers for the illness, a spokesman for Customs and Border Protection told WBZ-TV. That’s because there are no direct flights to Boston from that region. Additional health screening for coronavirus is in place at JFK Airport in New York, San Francisco International Airport and Los Angeles International Airport. The agency said the CDC has determined that coronavirus presents a low risk to the...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Coronavirus Logan Airport Source Type: news

National Capacities Review Tool for a Novel Coronavirus (nCoV)
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 1/10/2020. The main aim of this five-page national capacities review tool is to better understand existing capacities in the area of detection and response to a novel coronavirus (nCoV) that is zoonotic and causes respiratory disease. The tool was developed with other coronaviruses, such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, in mind and in consultation with member states. This information will help national authorities to identify main gaps, perform risk assessments, and plan for additional investigations, response, and control actions. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide fo...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Capacities Review Tool for a Novel Coronavirus (nCoV)
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 1/9/2020. The main aim of this five-page tool is to better understand existing capacities in the area of detection and response to a novel coronavirus (nCoV) that is zoonotic and causes respiratory disease. The tool was developed with other coronaviruses, such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, in mind and in consultation with member states. This information will help national authorities to identify main gaps, perform risk assessments, and plan for additional investigations, response, and control actions. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WHO (World Health Organization) Recommendations to Reduce Risk of Transmission of Emerging Pathogens from Animals to Humans in Live Animal Markets
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 1/2020. A novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) was identified by Chinese authorities on January 7, 2020. Available evidence on the 2019-nCoV virus and previous experience with other coronavirus (MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV) and other respiratory viruses (e.g., avian influenza) suggest that there may be zoonotic transmission associated with the 2019-nCoV. This web page provides the World Health Organization's general recommendations, and recommendations for at-risk groups, regarding live animal markets to reduce risk of transmission of emerging pathogens. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news