Nothing to Learn from East Asia?
By Jomo Kwame SundaramKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Jan 19 2021 (IPS) Covid-19 infection and death rates in the Western world and many developing countries in Asia and Latin America have long overtaken East Asia since the second quarter of 2020. Perhaps unsurprisingly, considering prevailing Western accounts of the Asian financial crises, there have been no serious efforts to draw policy lessons from East Asian contagion containment. Jomo Kwame SundaramLockdowns necessary? Although most East Asian economies have successfully contained the pandemic without nationwide ‘stay in shelter lockdowns’, many governments have...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Asia-Pacific Economy & Trade Financial Crisis Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Epidemiology of dog bite incidents in Chile: factors related to the patterns of human-dog relationship - Barrios CL, Bustos-L ópez C, Pavletic C, Parra A, Vidal M, Bowen J, Fatjó J.
Dog bites are one of the main public health problems. They produce important consequences for those who suffer them (physical and psychological injuries, secondary infections, sequelae, risk of transmission of zoonoses and surgeries, among others). The o... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

An epidemiological study of the clinico-social profile of animal bite patients attending the anti-rabies clinic of a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi - Panda M, Kapoor R, Ramesh V.
BACKGROUND: Rabies is a zoonotic disease caused by the rabies virus (RABV). Annually about 59,000 persons die of rabies, of which 20,000 are from India alone. Rabies though 100% fatal is preventable with post-exposure prophylaxis which includes wound washi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

‘ We Might Have a Covid-21 or Covid-22 Coming Our Way ’
The World Health Organization (WHO) is working closely with global experts, governments and partners to rapidly expand scientific knowledge on this new virus, to track the spread and virulence of the virus, and to provide advice to countries and individuals on measures to protect health and prevent the spread of this outbreak. Credit: WHOBy Cristián SamperNEW YORK, Dec 23 2020 (IPS) Cristián Samper is working for the Wildlife Conservation Society, an organization that concerns itself with the health of wildlife all over the globe. And he warned –even before the Covid-19 pandemic – about the danger...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Cristian Samper Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Peace Sustainability TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Fighting the menace of zoonoses
(Hokkaido University) Hokkaido University is pleased to announce the publication of 'Tackling Global Issues Vol. 3 FIGHTING THE MENACE OF ZOONOSES,' a magazine featuring the University's research on zoonotic and other infectious diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 23, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Preexisting and de novo humoral immunity to SARS-CoV-2 in humans
Zoonotic introduction of novel coronaviruses may encounter preexisting immunity in humans. Using diverse assays for antibodies recognizing SARS-CoV-2 proteins, we detected preexisting humoral immunity. SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (S)–reactive antibodies were detectable using a flow cytometry–based method in SARS-CoV-2–uninfected individuals and were particularly prevalent in children and adolescents. They were predominantly of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) class and targeted the S2 subunit. By contrast, SARS-CoV-2 infection induced higher titers of SARS-CoV-2 S–reactive IgG antibodies targeting both ...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ng, K. W., Faulkner, N., Cornish, G. H., Rosa, A., Harvey, R., Hussain, S., Ulferts, R., Earl, C., Wrobel, A. G., Benton, D. J., Roustan, C., Bolland, W., Thompson, R., Agua-Doce, A., Hobson, P., Heaney, J., Rickman, H., Paraskevopoulou, S., Houlihan, C. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Risks of invasive and alien predator species for health and ecology
(Goethe University Frankfurt) The raccoon, raccoon dog, mink and golden jackal are not native to Europe, but are increasingly spreading there. The joint research project ZOWIAC, 'Zoonotic and ecological effects on wildlife of invasive carnivores' by Goethe University and the Senckenberg Society for Nature Research will study how these invasive and alien species threaten biological diversity and which diseases they can transmit to humans and animals. The project is mainly funded by the German Federal Environmental Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cutting UK overseas aid could harm the fight against future pandemics | Matthew Baylis and Fiona Tomley
In our age of emerging pathogens, funding for global research into zoonotic diseases such as Covid-19, Ebola and Sars is vitalCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThis year, we ’ve seen how a previously unknown animal virus can spill over into the human population in one country, pass rapidly between people, and spread across the world in days. With nearly1.5m reported deaths from Covid-19, the virus is a startling indication of how the health of the world ’s human population is inseparable from animals and the environment that we share with them.Treating health in a way that recogn...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Baylis and Fiona Tomley Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Infectious diseases Microbiology Science Health World news Society Medical research Ebola Sars Aid UK news Source Type: news

Enhanced Zika virus susceptibility of globally invasive Aedes aegypti populations
The drivers and patterns of zoonotic virus emergence in the human population are poorly understood. The mosquito Aedes aegypti is a major arbovirus vector native to Africa that invaded most of the world’s tropical belt over the past four centuries, after the evolution of a "domestic" form that specialized in biting humans and breeding in water storage containers. Here, we show that human specialization and subsequent spread of A. aegypti out of Africa were accompanied by an increase in its intrinsic ability to acquire and transmit the emerging human pathogen Zika virus. Thus, the recent evolution and global...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Aubry, F., Dabo, S., Manet, C., Filipovic, I., Rose, N. H., Miot, E. F., Martynow, D., Baidaliuk, A., Merkling, S. H., Dickson, L. B., Crist, A. B., Anyango, V. O., Romero-Vivas, C. M., Vega-Rua, A., Dusfour, I., Jiolle, D., Paupy, C., Mayanja, M. N., Lut Tags: Microbiology reports Source Type: news

The Covid-carrying Danish mink are a warning sign – but is anyone heeding it? | Matthew Baylis
Sars, Mers, now this: we must think hard about how we farm animals that are known hosts of human coronavirusesTwo decades ago, aseminal study from the University of Edinburgh compiled a list of all known human infectious diseases. It found a total of 1,415 different human pathogens, and claimed that 61% were capable of spreading between humans and animals. Today, with the world put on hold by adeadly disease that seems likely to have spread first from bats to humans, we know the dangerous effects of such pathogens all too well.The group of diseases that spread from animals to humans are collectively known as zoonoses. The ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Baylis Tags: Coronavirus Farming Environment Science Sars Infectious diseases Denmark Europe Source Type: news

The Covid Pandemic: Broadening the Discourse
Thailand’s COVID-19 response an example of resilience and solidarity: a UN Resident Coordinator’s BlogBy Asoka BandarageCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka, Nov 10 2020 (IPS) SARS-CoV-2, the corona virus that causes COVID-19, has been spreading exponentially across the world over the last ten or so months. As of November 6th, according to the Center for Systems Science at Johns Hopkins University, there have been 49,195,581 cases of COVID-19, including 1,241,031 deaths. More than a third of the global population has been placed on lockdown. The global economy is experiencing the deepest global recession since World War 2 and m...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Asoka Bandarage Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Peace TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Escaping the ‘ Era of Pandemics ’ : experts warn worse crises to come; offer options to reduce risk
By External SourceOct 29 2020 (IPS-Partners) Future pandemics will emerge more often, spread more rapidly, do more damage to the world economy and kill more people than COVID-19 unless there is a transformative change in the global approach to dealing with infectious diseases, warns a major new report on biodiversity and pandemics by 22 leading experts from around the world. Convened by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) for an urgent virtual workshop about the links between degradation of nature and increasing pandemic risks, the experts agree that escaping the er...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Biodiversity Environment Health Humanitarian Emergencies Source Type: news

Are bushmeat hunters aware of zoonotic disease? Yes, but that's not the issue
(University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture) A recent paper published in the journal PLOS ONE, outlines how researchers with the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine and Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, measured the attitudes, practices and zoonoses awareness among community members associated with the bushmeat trade in northern Uganda. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tufts University to lead $100M program to reduce risk of zoonotic viral spillover, spread
(Tufts University) Tufts University will lead a $100 million, five-year multi-institution program to understand and address threats posed by zoonotic viral diseases that can " spill over " from animals to humans, such as SARS-CoV-2, in an effort to reduce risk of infection, amplification, and spread, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) announced today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 30, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'Why wait for it?' How to predict a pandemic
Strides are being made towards an open access atlas that could predict where dangerous animal-borne viruses will next appearHow do you predict where a deadly tropical disease such as Ebola, possibly the most virulent in the world, will appear next? Since it first emerged in a small town on the edge of a Congolese forest, it has broken out in seven other African countries, often thousands of miles apart.Sometimes it has spilled out of remote rainforest and then disappeared for years. Other times it has turned up in cities, baffling world bodies and governments that can only try to respond as fast as possible. But actually, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: John Vidal Tags: Infectious diseases Ebola Zika virus Coronavirus outbreak Microbiology Medical research Science World news Animals Farming Environment Climate change Source Type: news

Epidemiological profile of animal bite patients attending emergency department at a tertiary care health facility in a northern hilly Indian city - Kumar S, Gupta A, Sachdeva A, Chaudhary A, Chamotra S.
BACKGROUND: Rabies is a highly infectious zoonotic disease with a high case fatality rate. In India, approximately 20,000 deaths among 17.4 million exposed people occur every year. The data on animal bites is scarce and unreliable due to poor surveillance ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

A cross sectional study to assess the knowledge and response to dog bite among the urban and rural population of Hubballi taluk - Godbole M, Joshi AR, Bant DD.
BACKGROUND: Rabies is a fatal zoonotic disease of the central nervous system, most commonly caused by the bite of rabid dogs. Globally canine rabies causes 59,000 human deaths, over 3.7 million DALYs and 8.6 billion USD economic losses annually. These loss... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

More Covid-19-like viruses to come, warns Oxford professor
Sarah Gilbert, the lead expert behind Oxford University's Covid vaccine, said modern lifestyles, intense farming and deforestation drove up the risk of outbreaks of zoonotic infections. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Using surveillance of animal bite patients to decipher potential risks of rabies exposure from domestic animals and wildlife in Brazil - Benavides JA, Megid J, Campos A, Hampson K.
Direct contact with domestic animals and wildlife is linked to zoonotic spillover risk. Patients presenting with animal-bite injuries provide a potentially valuable source of surveillance data on rabies viruses that are transmitted primarily by animal bite... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Rise in Babesiosis Cases, Pennsylvania, USA, 2005-2018 Rise in Babesiosis Cases, Pennsylvania, USA, 2005-2018
In light of the emergence of babesiosis in the state of Pennsylvania, clinicians should be aware of the signs and symptoms of this zoonotic disease.Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - August 12, 2020 Category: Pathology Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Disrupted Habitats Have More Zoonotic Disease Hosts: Study
Animals that can host pathogens dangerous to humans, such as rodents, birds, and bats, are proportionately more common in human-occupied spaces than in remote areas. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 6, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Africa: The One Health Approach to Preventing the Next Pandemic
[AfricaFocus] Editor's Note: "COVID-19 is just one example of the rising trend of diseases - from Ebola to MERS to West Nile and Rift Valley fevers - caused by viruses that have jumped from animal hosts into the human population. ... The rising trend in zoonotic diseases is driven by the degradation of our natural environment - through land degradation, wildlife exploitation, resource extraction, climate change, and other stresses." - Press release from UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and International Livestock Re (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 3, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Inside the Global Quest to Trace the Origins of COVID-19 —and Predict Where It Will Go Next
It wasn’t greed, or curiosity, that made Li Rusheng grab his shotgun and enter Shitou Cave. It was about survival. During Mao-era collectivization of the early 1970s, food was so scarce in the emerald valleys of southwestern China’s Yunnan province that farmers like Li could expect to eat meat only once a year–if they were lucky. So, craving protein, Li and his friends would sneak into the cave to hunt the creatures they could hear squeaking and fluttering inside: bats. Li would creep into the gloom and fire blindly at the vaulted ceiling, picking up any quarry that fell to the ground, while his companion...
Source: TIME: Health - July 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell/ Yuxi, Yunnan and Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Clear strategies needed to reduce bushmeat hunting
(Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology) Extensive wildlife trade not only threatens species worldwide but can also lead to the transmission of zoonotic diseases. An international research team led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research shed new light on the motivations why people hunt, trade or consume different species. The research shows that more differentiated solutions are needed to prevent uncontrolled disease emergence and species decline. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Africa: Africa Can Lead Fight Against Future Pandemics
[UNEP] Nairobi -- As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to take lives and disrupt economies across the world, a new report warns that further outbreaks will emerge unless governments take active measures to prevent other zoonotic diseases from crossing into the human population, and sets out ten recommendations to prevent future pandemics. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 10, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Africa: How to Prevent Future Pandemics - Stop Spread of Viruses From Animals
[UNEP] Ebola, SARS, Zika, HIV/AIDS, West Nile fever and now COVID-19. These are some of the highest-profile diseases to emerge in the last several decades. And while they emerged in different parts of the world, they have one thing in common. They are what scientists call "zoonotic diseases," infections that jump between animals and humans, some of which leave illness and death in their wake. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 10, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Where did the Asian longhorned ticks in the US come from?
(Rutgers University) The invasive population of Asian longhorned ticks in the United States likely began with three or more self-cloning females from northeastern Asia, according to a Rutgers-led study. Asian longhorned ticks outside the U.S. can carry debilitating diseases. In the United States and elsewhere they can threaten livestock and pets. The new study, published in the journal Zoonoses and Public Health, sheds new light on the origin of these exotic ticks and how they are spreading across the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New UN report outlines ways to curb growing spread of animal-to-human diseases
As the battle against COVID-19 rages, the world can expect to see other diseases that pass from animals to humans emerge, according to a new UN report launched on Monday, which maintains that there is still time to head off potential zoonotic pandemics. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - July 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Essential Vocab For COVID-19: From Asymptomatic To Zoonotic
The pandemic has brought many new terms into daily usage. Here are definitions of some of the words used in discussion of the novel coronavirus and how to stem its spread.(Image credit: Angela Hsieh for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pien Huang Source Type: news

How Deforestation Helps Deadly Viruses Jump from Animals to Humans
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post How Deforestation Helps Deadly Viruses Jump from Animals to Humans appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Environment Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Environmental DNA detection could cut pathogens in pet trade
(Washington State University) As the SARS-CoV-2 puts new focus on zoonotic pathogens, a Washington State University researcher has developed a method to use environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect disease in the vast international trade of aquatic animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Causes Pyogenic Granulomas?
Discussion Pyogenic granuloma (PG) is a benign, vascular lesion of the skin. PGs are red, small, often pedunculated nodules that can rapidly increase in size (up to 1-2 cm). They also can often ulcerate and bleed. They frequently occur on the head and neck, with back and chest being the next most common locations but can occur in other locations. They usually are solitary and do not regress. They are seen in children (mean age 6.7 years), young adults and pregnant women (5%). Treatment is electrocautery or excision. Learning Point PG’s cause is not fully understood. A gene has recently been identified with PG sugge...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 15, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Coronavirus spread by asymptomatic people 'appears to be rare,' WHO official says
The spread of Covid-19 by someone who is not showing symptoms appears to be rare, Maria Van Kerkhove, the World Health Organization's technical lead for coronavirus response and head of the emerging diseases and zoonoses unit, said during a media briefing in Geneva on Monday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nigeria: COVID-19 Threatens to Hit Fragile Northeastern States Hardest - UNDP Studies
[Africa Renewal] The arrival of COVID-19 in Nigeria sparked a cascade of crises, but the pandemic poses its greatest threat in the impoverished, fragile northeast of Africa's largest country, according to a new UNDP assessment. There, Borno, Adamawa, and Yobe states comprise "one of the most pronounced, multi-faceted, and complex humanitarian and development crises known to the international community today," UNDP's 2018 Nigeria Human Development report found--more than two years before the zoonotic pathogen we now know as (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 9, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Nigeria: COVID-19 Threatens to Hit Fragile States Hardest - Studies
[Africa Renewal] The arrival of COVID-19 in Nigeria sparked a cascade of crises, but the pandemic poses its greatest threat in the impoverished, fragile northeast of Africa's largest country, according to a new UNDP assessment. There, Borno, Adamawa, and Yobe states comprise "one of the most pronounced, multi-faceted, and complex humanitarian and development crises known to the international community today," UNDP's 2018 Nigeria Human Development report found--more than two years before the zoonotic pathogen we now know as (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 9, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Coronavirus spread by people with no symptoms 'appears to be rare,' WHO official says
The spread of Covid-19 by someone who is not showing symptoms appears to be rare, Maria Van Kerkhove, the World Health Organization's technical lead for coronavirus response and head of the emerging diseases and zoonoses unit, said during a media briefing in Geneva on Monday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AIBS Responding to COVID-19 Crisis
During the COVID-19 crisis, AIBS has continued to support our clients, partners, and members in our collective efforts to promote informed decision-making that advances science for the benefit of society. We continue to work to help the biological sciences community respond the effects of disruptions arising from COVID-19, and to prepare for continued impact and effectiveness as we all prepare for new models of operation. AIBS is proud to have: Helped science educators identify and develop resources to enable science instruction to continue in online formats. Worked with research funding organizations to supp...
Source: AIBS News - June 8, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

2nd World Food Safety Day
By Dr Renata ClarkeROME, Jun 8 2020 (IPS) Few things are as natural and as necessary as eating food. However, if food producers, food processors, food handlers and consumers do not follow good food safety practices, food can become contaminated and rather than nourishing us and bringing us pleasure it can make us sick or even kill us. According to World Health Organization (WHO) Statistics, the public health burden of unsafe food is very high: in 2015 they estimated that over 600 million people fall ill and 420 000 die every year from foodborne diseases. It was at the launching of the WHO 2015 Report on the Burden of Food...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Dr Renata Clarke Tags: Economy & Trade Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Food Sustainability Global Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Natural Resources TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

COVID-19 Is a Symptom of a Bigger Problem: Our Planet ’s Ailing Health
The COVID-19 outbreak is a global tragedy. Hundreds of thousands have died, healthcare systems are buckling, and the future is uncertain for millions of people whose livelihoods are collapsing. It is absolutely right that the focus today is on saving lives here and now. In the same spirit of doing what we can to safeguard people’s wellbeing, we must not content ourselves with containing the acute crisis. We must also look ahead to what we can learn from this crisis to prevent future risks. COVID-19 is a reminder of how vulnerable even our modern, technologically advanced societies are. The biggest lesson is that COVI...
Source: TIME: Health - June 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Inger Andersen and Johan Rockström Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

COVID-19 Is a Symptom of a Bigger Problem: Our Planet ’s Ailing Health
The COVID-19 outbreak is a global tragedy. Hundreds of thousands have died, healthcare systems are buckling, and the future is uncertain for millions of people whose livelihoods are collapsing. It is absolutely right that the focus today is on saving lives here and now. In the same spirit of doing what we can to safeguard people’s wellbeing, we must not content ourselves with containing the acute crisis. We must also look ahead to what we can learn from this crisis to prevent future risks. COVID-19 is a reminder of how vulnerable even our modern, technologically advanced societies are. The biggest lesson is that COVI...
Source: TIME: Science - June 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Inger Andersen and Johan Rockström Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Africa: What Zoologists Should Learn From a Zoonotic Pandemic
[The Conversation Africa] Zoology has an illustrious history; it has triggered paradigm shifts in thinking. One of the best known was Darwin's theory of evolution, based on his observations of the natural world. It became the cornerstone of current zoological research. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 5, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Beyond the COVID-19 Pandemic: What Now?
WHO delivered medical supplies to fight the COVID-19 pandemic in the Republic of Congo in April 2020. Credit: World Health Organization (WHO)By Lawrence SurendraBANGKOK, Thailand, Jun 4 2020 (IPS) In the midst of the COVID 19 pandemic, the much-anticipated 73rd World Health Assembly (WHA) of the WHO concluded without any major controversies or disagreements. The landmark WHA resolution to bring the world together to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, co-sponsored by more than 130 countries, and adopted by consensus, called for the intensification of efforts to control the pandemic, and for equitable access to and fair distribut...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Lawrence Surendra Tags: Aid Climate Change Development & Aid Environment Featured Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Flying foxes in SA exposed to zoonotic viruses
(University of Adelaide) University of Adelaide researchers have found that South Australia's population of Grey-headed flying foxes, which took up residence in 2010, has been exposed to a number of viruses, including Hendra virus that can be transmitted to humans via horses. But they have not found evidence of exposure to Australian bat lyssavirus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 11, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

COVID-19 & Human Health Risks Linked to Wildlife Trade Practices
An animal market in Indonesia. Credit: TRAFFICBy Steven BroadCAMBRIDGE, UK, May 7 2020 (IPS) At the time of writing, the COVID-19 pandemic is raging worldwide, causing human mortality and socio-economic disruption on a massive scale and it appears highly likely that profound impacts will continue for many years to come. Although the precise origins of the disease remain unproven, there are strong indications of a wild animal source and a direct link to wildlife trade in China. Even if evidence points elsewhere in future, the magnitude of the current outbreak places under an intense spotlight concerns raised by zoonotic d...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Steven Broad Tags: Civil Society Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Detection of Zoonotic Bartonella Pathogens in Rabbit Fleas Detection of Zoonotic Bartonella Pathogens in Rabbit Fleas
What can the identification of bartonella pathogens in wild rabbit fleas tell us about the transmission of fleaborne zoonoses?Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

What Does Covid-19 Crisis Mean for Rural Development?
David Lewis is professor of social policy and development at the London School of Economics & Political Science By David LewisLONDON, Apr 22 2020 (IPS) The implications and consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic are playing out before us. Much of the news coverage of the to date in both the Global North and the Global South has understandably focused on the horrifying impact of the disease on urban communities, where it is clearly hitting people, and economies, hardest. David LewisBut what are the implications for people in rural areas, where just under a half of the world’s population live, and where the largest...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David Lewis Tags: Aid Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

We Need to Rethink Our Food System to Prevent the Next Pandemic
Once a dangerous new pathogen is out, as we are seeing, it can be difficult if not impossible to prevent it going global. One as contagious as SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to infect the whole of humanity. Eighty per cent of cases may be benign, but with such a large pool of susceptible hosts, the numbers who experience severe illness and die can still be shockingly high. So the only sensible answer to the question, how do we stop this from happening again, is: by doing all we can to prevent such pathogens infecting humans in the first place. And that means taking a long, hard look at our relationship with the natural world...
Source: TIME: Health - April 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Spinney Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Africa: Six Nature Facts Related to Coronaviruses
[UNEP] Did you know that 60 per cent of all emerging infectious diseases in humans are zoonotic, in other words they come to us via animals? (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 9, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Want to Stop the Next Pandemic? Start Protecting Wildlife Habitats
(Bloomberg) — There are four critical facets of pandemic prevention, according to Lee Hannah, senior scientist at Conservation International. Three of them make immediate sense against the backdrop of our current emergency: stockpile masks and respirators; have testing infrastructure ready; and ban the global wildlife trade, including the open animal markets where COVID-19 may have first infected people. His fourth recommendation is more grandiose: “Take care of nature.” The assault on ecosystems that allowed COVID-19 to jump from animals to humans went far beyond merchants hunting and selling rare wildli...
Source: TIME: Science - April 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Eric Roston / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news

Ban wildlife markets to avert pandemics, says UN biodiversity chief
Warning comes as destruction of nature increasingly seen as key driver of zoonotic diseasesSee all our coronavirus coverageCoronavirus latest: at a glanceThe United Nations ’ biodiversity chief has called for a global ban on wildlife markets – such as the one in Wuhan, China, believed to be the starting point of the coronavirus outbreak – to prevent future pandemics.Elizabeth Maruma Mrema,the acting executive secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity, said countries should move to prevent future pandemics by banning “wet markets” that sell live and dead animals for human consumpti...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 6, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Greenfield Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Environment Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Animals Food China Wildlife United Nations Source Type: news