Massachusetts Now First State To Ban Flavored Tobacco, Vaping Products

BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts became the first state to ban the sale of flavored tobacco and vaping products, including menthol cigarettes, after the Republican governor signed a bill Wednesday that responds to recent deaths linked to e-cigarettes and attempts to reduce their appeal to young people. Anti-smoking groups hailed the ban signed by Gov. Charlie Baker, which outlaws the sale of flavored vaping products immediately and of menthol cigarettes starting June 1, 2020. Some states have temporarily banned or restricted flavored tobacco or vaping products to different degrees, but Massachusetts is the first state with a permanent ban in place, anti-smoking groups say. Especially notable is its ban on menthol, which is among the most popular flavors and has often been exempted from bans. The bill is a “major step forward,” Baker said, but states can do only so much to address the public health emergency around e-cigarettes and other vaping products. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration are the only ones that can address the issues comprehensively, he said. President Donald Trump has promised for months to approve a national ban on most flavored e-cigarettes. But in recent weeks his administration canceled a planned announcement of a ban, and Trump has said he will meet with the vaping industry and medical professionals instead. “It’s pretty clear there isn’t going to be a federal policy ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Consumer Featured Health Politics Syndicated CBSN Boston Vaping vaping ban Source Type: news

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In the Scheetz household, back-to-school anxiety reached new heights this fall. Jami Scheetz’s 15-year-old son Devon, who has severe asthma, kicked a brutal vaping habit over the summer, with help from a nicotine patch. But as soon as school started and he was once again around kids vaping, his habit returned. On Sept. 12, Devon vaped at school and immediately began sweating and vomiting. Though Scheetz, who lives in Sellersville, Pa., says her son is now fine, she can’t shake thoughts of kids who have been hospitalized or died after using e-cigarettes. “Vaping scares me more [than smoking], because they ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized vaping Source Type: news
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Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Momentum is growing for a nationwide movement to raise the legal age of tobacco purchase from 18 to 21. Experts say the widespread and worrisome teen vaping epidemic is a major catalyst—but so is support from e-cigarette and tobacco companies, which has some health groups feeling uneasy. On June 7, Texas joined about a dozen other states in enacting so-called Tobacco 21 policies; even more cities and counties have raised their legal buying ages, and a string of national retailers have instituted corporate policies that echo these legislative efforts. In Texas, the law will raise the purchasing age for all tobacco pro...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news
Juul founders Adam Bowen and James Monsees, who were named to the 2019 TIME 100 list, called vaping’s potential for helping adult smokers ditch combustible cigarettes “one of the greatest opportunities for public health in the history of mankind” at the TIME 100 Gala on Tuesday. Juul has dominated the e-cigarette market with its sleek devices, which deliver nicotine without many of the harmful, cancer-causing substances in combustible cigarettes. But while the devices are designed to give adult smokers an alternative to cigarettes, Juul and other brands have developed a massive following among teenagers &...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health T100 2019 TIME 100 Source Type: news
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Thursday followed through on a rumored plan to significantly restrict the sale of flavored e-cigarettes in an effort to keep young users away from tobacco products. “The bottom line is this: I will not allow a generation of children to become addicted to nicotine through e-cigarettes,” said FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb in a statement. “We won’t let this pool of kids, a pool of future potential smokers, of future disease and death, to continue to build. We’ll take whatever action is necessary to stop these trends from continuing.” That act...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news
In 1965, when Herbert Gilbert was granted the first patent on a smoke- and tobacco-­free cigarette, he wrote that the product would “provide a safe and harmless means for and method of smoking.” More than 60 years later, however, modern iterations of Gilbert’s invention have sparked debate in the public-health community. E-cigarettes, which have grown increasingly popular in the past five years, were designed as a tool to help people quit ­smoking—and by doing so they should drastically reduce rates of lung cancer and other diseases. But the question is, does that potential outweigh their po...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news
Being a family caregiver today is a demanding responsibility. If caregiving is stressful for the “typical” caregiver—a 49-year-old woman—think how much more is at stake when the caregiver is a child or teenager. Yet more than a million youngsters ages 8–18 take on challenging tasks to help a parent, grandparent, sibling, or other relative. While that number is undoubtedly an underestimate, it does not even include an emerging subgroup—children whose parents are struggling with opioid addiction. If we have limited information about the young people taking care of those with diabetes, canc...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Population Health Public Health Quality Agnes Leu child caregivers family caregivers National Alliance for Caregiving Saul Becker United Hospital Fund Source Type: blogs
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Source: Internal Medicine Journal - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Addiction Medicine: Clinical & Ethical Perspectives Source Type: research
If you saw the “Diabetic Lesbians and a Blushing Bride” episode of last season’s CBS sitcom “Mom,” an improbably funny series about the struggles of a mother (Allison Janney) and daughter (Anna Farris) in recovery from alcohol and drug abuse, the last five minutes held a shocker for you: a teenager played by recurring guest star Emily Osment dies of a drug overdose. But then you were in for another surprise: U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy in dress blues, flanked by Janney and Farris, warning that drug overdoses kill more Americans than car crashes. The families behind these numbers, he...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Written By Myra ChristopherMy mom was a steel magnolia (i.e., southern and perfectly charming), but she had a steel rod up her back. After her first surgery for stomach cancer at age 53, she refused pain medication because she said that she “could take it.” She was young and strong and committed to “beating cancer.” After nearly two years of chemotherapy, radiation and two more surgeries, the cancer won. Eventually, I watched her beg nurses to give her “a shot” minutes before another was scheduled and be told they were sorry but she would have to wait. I could tell by the expressions on ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care chronic pain Opioid addiction Opioid Epidemic Opioid prescriptions syndicated Source Type: blogs
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