Natalie Joseph, M.D., M.P.H., recognized for contributions to HPV vaccination
(Boston Medical Center) Natalie Joseph, M.D., M.P.H., a pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist at Boston Medical Center (BMC), has been named Massachusetts' 'HPV Vaccine Is Cancer Prevention Champion' for outstanding efforts to protect adolescents from cancers caused by HPV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What Causes Hyperpigmentation?
Discussion Skin color is primarily due to genetic factors. Melanocytes are usually found in skin in the basal layer of the epidermis which is also where the melanin usually lies. There are a range of normal skin phenotypes that have been described by Fitzpatrick and range from I-VI: I – pale white skin, blond hair, blue eyed, does not tan, always burns II – fair skin, blue eyed, tans poorly, burns easily III – darker white skin, burns initially then tans IV – light brown skin, tans easily, burns minimally V – brown skin, tans darkly easily, burns rarely VI – dark brown skin, alway...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - December 17, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Teenage rugby player loses his leg to cancer six years after his mother's death
Olly Liddle, from Whitley Bay near Newcastle, had to have his right leg cut off above the knee because of osteosarcoma, a rare type of cancer in the bone. His mother, Kerrie, died of breast cancer in 2012. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kidney Disease Claiming More Lives
THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 -- Although fewer Americans are dying from heart disease and cancer, deaths from chronic kidney disease are on the rise, especially among young adults, a new study finds. " Unfortunately, chronic kidney disease is known as a... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

A New Study Says There Are Five Different Types of Problem Drinkers. Here ’s What They Are
For those who choose to drink alcohol, the healthiest level of consumption is typically defined as up to a drink per day for women, or up to two per day for men. “Low-risk” drinking, meanwhile, is defined for women as no more than three drinks in a single day and no more than seven per week; for men, it’s four in a day and 14 per week. People who exceed these benchmarks are considered at risk for alcohol use disorder, as well as health conditions such as cancer and cognitive decline. As clear as these definitions are on paper, however, identifying problem drinking can be more challenging in real life. To...
Source: TIME: Health - November 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

A New Study Says There Are 5 Different Types of Problem Drinkers. Here ’s What They Are
For those who choose to drink alcohol, the healthiest level of consumption is typically defined as up to a drink per day for women, or up to two per day for men. “Low-risk” drinking, meanwhile, is defined for women as no more than three drinks in a single day and no more than seven per week; for men, it’s four in a day and 14 per week. People who exceed these benchmarks are considered at risk for alcohol use disorder, as well as health conditions such as cancer and cognitive decline. As clear as these definitions are on paper, however, identifying problem drinking can be more challenging in real life. To...
Source: TIME: Health - November 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Free and based on need? Not for everyone
One thing we like to boast of about the NHS is that health care is free – “at the point of delivery” – and based on patients’ clinical need, not their ability to pay. But that is no longer true for everyone. The NHS Constitution now says that “NHS services are free of charge, except in limited circumstances sanctioned by Parliament”. Those ‘limited circumstances’ include an “immigration health surcharge” for people from outside Europe coming to live and work in the UK on a temporary visa. From December, this will mean paying £400 per person, for e...
Source: UNISON Health care news - November 22, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: Val Johnston Tags: Blogs News campaign health health care health charges NHS Source Type: news

Father, 35, survived cancer as a teenager thanks to his brother's bone marrow transplant
Harry Page, from New Jersey, US, had acute myeloid leukaemia when he was 19 years old and survived thanks to a bone marrow transplant from his brother, Ryan, who then died in 2006. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

As vaping increased in popularity, use of cigarettes declined
(Georgetown University Medical Center) Cigarette smoking dramatically decreased between 2013 and 2017 just as e-cigarette use became more popular, according to a comprehensive analysis examining the relationship between vaping and smoking among youth and young adults led by a Georgetown University investigator. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Obesity as a Teen Ups Risk for Later Pancreatic Cancer
FRIDAY, Nov. 16, 2018 -- Men and women who are obese as adolescents are at an increased risk for pancreatic cancer in adulthood, according to an study published online Nov. 12 in Cancer. Zohor Levi, M.D., from the Rabin Medical Center in Petach... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The FDA Is Severely Restricting the Sale of Flavored E-Cigarettes. Here ’s What to Know
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Thursday followed through on a rumored plan to significantly restrict the sale of flavored e-cigarettes in an effort to keep young users away from tobacco products. “The bottom line is this: I will not allow a generation of children to become addicted to nicotine through e-cigarettes,” said FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb in a statement. “We won’t let this pool of kids, a pool of future potential smokers, of future disease and death, to continue to build. We’ll take whatever action is necessary to stop these trends from continuing.” That act...
Source: TIME: Health - November 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

Teenage Obesity & Fourfold Increase in Risk for Pancreatic Cancer Teenage Obesity & Fourfold Increase in Risk for Pancreatic Cancer
Data linking two large Israeli databases suggest that obesity during teenage years increases the risk for adult pancreatic cancer fourfold. Being overweight increases the risk twofold.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Teenage Obesity May Raise Pancreatic Cancer Risk Years Later
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - November 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncology, Pediatrics, Nutrition, News, Source Type: news

Teenage Obesity May Raise Pancreatic Cancer Risk Years Later
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 -- Obesity in the teen years may increase the risk of developing deadly pancreatic cancer in adulthood, researchers report. The odds for this rare cancer can quadruple due to obesity, the Israeli research team found.... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Teenage Obesity May Raise Pancreatic Cancer Risk Years Later
Title: Teenage Obesity May Raise Pancreatic Cancer Risk Years LaterCategory: Health NewsCreated: 11/14/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/14/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General - November 14, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Better access to psychological support needed for dieters
‘Obesity is not a choice’, and fat shaming is unhelpful Related items fromOnMedica What promotes uptake and retention in group-based weight management services? Novel imagery technique boosts weight loss GPs should lead on weight management advice to children Severe mental illness linked to poorer physical health Adolescent obesity linked to higher pancreatic cancer risk in adulthood (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 14, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Teenage Obesity May Raise Pancreatic Cancer Risk Years Later
(Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - November 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Teenage Obesity May Raise Pancreatic Cancer Risk Years Later
(Source: Cancercompass News: Pancreatic Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Pancreatic Cancer - November 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Move More, Sit Less: Government Issues New Exercise Guidelines
By Arman Azad, CNN (CNN) — If you’re sitting down while reading this, stand up. Guidelines released Monday by the federal government show that most Americans are not getting the exercise they need, costing the health care system over $100 billion each year. The new standards are similar to those released 10 years ago, but the government is scrapping a recommendation that physical activity occur in 10-minute blocks, instead telling Americans to “move more and sit less” whenever possible. Any amount of exercise has some health benefits, officials say, and some benefits are even immediate, like better ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Exercise Source Type: news

Weight during adolescence may affect pancreatic cancer risk in adulthood
(Wiley) New research has linked adolescent obesity with up to a four-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer later in life. The study's results also suggest that overweight and even higher weight within the 'normal' weight range in men may increase pancreatic cancer risk in a graded manner. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trends in opioid prescriptions in children, adolescents
(JAMA Network) Prescription opioids dispensed to children and adolescents have steadily decreased since 2012 in an analysis of data from a large commercial insurance provider. The analysis include all oral opioids used for pain, excluding cough suppressants, and individuals with a health care claim associated with a cancer diagnosis were excluded. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adolescent obesity linked to higher pancreatic cancer risk in adulthood
People who are obese as adolescents have up to a four-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer later in life Related items fromOnMedica Childhood obesity plan Local authorities urged to develop innovative plans against childhood obesity Pancreatic cancer is four separate diseases Diabetes can be warning sign for pancreatic cancer Public urged to know what pancreatic cancer symptoms to look out for (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 12, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

A systematic review summarizing the state of evidence on bullying in childhood cancer patients/survivors - Collins DE, Ellis SJ, Janin MM, Wakefield CE, Bussey K, Cohn RJ, Lah S, Fardell JE.
BACKGROUND: One in four school-aged children is bullied. However, the risk may be greater for childhood cancer patients/survivors (diagnosed ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Surprising Research on Cannabis
Much of what we think we know about cannabis may soon change as a result of new research that uncovers some surprising facts. Indeed, the topic, which can be emotionally charged, is the focus of intense scientific study. Is cannabis good for you? Is it addictive? What long-term harms can use cause? The answers to these questions are multi-layered and not always clear-cut, which is why cannabis research continues with even more urgency. FACTS ON CANNABIS ADDICTION AND DEPENDENCE Current estimates are that one in 10 cannabis users will develop cannabis addiction or dependence. The potency of the delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol ...
Source: Psych Central - November 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Addictions Habits Healthy Living Memory and Perception Miscellaneous Drugs Neuroscience Substance Abuse Source Type: news

Too Few Americans Get The HPV Vaccine
HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccination has increased in recent years, rates remain well below the government's 2020 goal of 80 percent of age-eligible adolescents, according to a recent report by the President’s Cancer Panel. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Are E-Cigarettes Safe? Here ’s What the Science Says
In 1965, when Herbert Gilbert was granted the first patent on a smoke- and tobacco-­free cigarette, he wrote that the product would “provide a safe and harmless means for and method of smoking.” More than 60 years later, however, modern iterations of Gilbert’s invention have sparked debate in the public-health community. E-cigarettes, which have grown increasingly popular in the past five years, were designed as a tool to help people quit ­smoking—and by doing so they should drastically reduce rates of lung cancer and other diseases. But the question is, does that potential outweigh their po...
Source: TIME: Health - November 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

A culturally tailored intervention increased HPV vaccination of Asian-American adolescents
(American Association for Cancer Research) A culturally tailored multilevel strategy designed to remove barriers to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among low-income, mostly Chinese-American adolescent girls and boys significantly increased vaccine uptake. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UA targeting rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare pediatric cancer with few treatment options
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) UA Cancer Center researcher harnesses 'big data' to identify targeted treatments for rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare cancer that mostly strikes children and teenagers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

That Stolen Giant Colon Was Found: How Things Worked Out In The End
Has the theft and recovery brought awareness to the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer among young adults and recent changes to screening recommendations? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 30, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Contributor Source Type: news

Cancer Survival Higher in Teens, Young Adults Than Other Groups
Long - term data show teens, young adults had temporary dip in cancer survival due to HIV/AIDS (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - October 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncology, Pediatrics, AIDS, Journal, Source Type: news

Cancer Survival Higher in Teens, Young Adults Than Other Groups
FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 -- Overall, cancer survival among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) has consistently exceeded that of other age groups except during the HIV/AIDS epidemic, according to a study published Oct. 15 in the Journal of the National... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 26, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Woman who fought cancer twice as teenager now works at the same hospital she was treated in
Catherine Pointer, 26, is now working as an expert researcher at Southampton General Hospital, where she was treated for leukaemia when she was 14 and 17 years old. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Colorectal cancer on the rise in young adults
Rates of colorectal cancer are rising by 6% per year in young adults Related items fromOnMedica Chemicals in green vegetables show to prevent bowel cancer Many trusts not offering genetic bowel cancer test Long-term antibiotic use linked to heightened risk of colorectal adenomas Developing and using a tool to improve outcomes in colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer risk link to ‘inflammatory’ foods (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - October 24, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Cannabis oil gives teenager new hope in his 13-year battle with a brain tumour
Kai Yearwood, from Kenley in London, has a rare non-cancerous brain tumour called a ganglioglioma, with which he was diagnosed at three years old and has been told it's terminal. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Barriers to early clinical trial access for adolescents and young adults still exist
(European Society for Medical Oncology) Young cancer patients at the crossroads of childhood and adulthood seem to be stuck in a treatment impasse. A study to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich, has highlighted the existence of barriers to the inclusion of 12 to 25-year-olds in both adult and paediatric early phase clinical trials, suggesting a need for more tailored approaches to give this patient population better access to therapeutic innovation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

This 13-Year-Old ’s Tool Could Change Pancreatic Cancer Treatment
An Oregon teenager’s innovation could change the way doctors treat pancreatic cancer, a deadly form of the disease that has just a 7% five-year survival rate. Rishab Jain, a 13-year-old from Stoller Middle School in Portland, on Tuesday won the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge with an algorithm that uses machine learning to help doctors zero in on the pancreas during cancer treatment. Doing so can be difficult, since the pancreas is often obscured by other organs, and since breathing and other bodily processes can cause it to move around the abdominal area. As a result, doctors sometimes need to deplo...
Source: TIME: Health - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Incredible transformation of cancer-stricken teenager
Kambou Sie travelled from his hometown of Bondoukou in the Ivory Coast to Italy, where he underwent life-changing surgery on a giant tumour that was engulfing his whole face. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Earlier diabetes diagnosis results in higher risk for other life-threatening diseases including cancer, heart disease, stroke
(Natural News) Even though Type 2 diabetes (T2D) was previously regarded as a disease that usually affected older individuals, the global epidemic of obesity has seen diagnoses soar among young adults, adolescents and even in young children. According to a study, “the earlier a person is diagnosed with T2D, the higher their risk of death from heart disease... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

USC analysis solves puzzle of poor cancer prognosis in young Americans
(University of Southern California) For decades, some researchers believed cancer survival rates were dismally low among adolescents and young adults in the United States. A reexamination of long-term data by researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of USC and the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program shows that 15- to 39-year-olds had the best survival of any age group for many years, and maintained that lead until pediatric cancer survival caught up. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

History of childhood abuse and risk for cervical cancer among women in low-income areas - Hindin P, Btoush R, Carmody DP.
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine pathways through which childhood abuse increases the risk of cervical cancer, including smoking, stress, risky sexual behavior, and not having a Papanicolaou (Pap) test. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

More Than 14 Million Preteens Need to Receive HPV Vaccine
FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 -- More than 14 million additional 11- to 12-year-olds need to be vaccinated to reach the American Cancer Society goal of 80 percent of adolescents being up to date (UTD) with the human papillomavirus vaccination (HPVV) by their... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Climate Change Could Destroy This Peruvian Farmer ’s Home. Now He’s Suing a European Energy Company for Damages
Climbing a snowcapped mountain in the predawn light, Saúl Luciano Lliuya says he could sense something changing. All his life, pristine glaciers have nestled between the peaks surrounding his hometown in the Cordillera Blanca region of the Peruvian Andes, providing water, work and beauty. “Now you can see it,” he says. “They’re disappearing.” The region’s glaciers are receding rapidly; as temperatures rise, thanks to greenhouse gases trapping heat in the earth’s atmosphere, ice accumulated over thousands of years has melted away in a single generation. Between 30% and 50% of...
Source: TIME: Science - October 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent / Hamburg Tags: Uncategorized Germany Source Type: news

Nearly 14 million additional adolescents need HPV vaccination to reach public health goal
(American Cancer Society) Nearly 14 million additional adolescents will need to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to reach the American Cancer Society's goal of an 80 percent vaccination rate by that 2026. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

These 6 Habits May Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer
Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in the U.S., affecting almost 85 of every 100,000 Americans, according to recent data from the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Around the globe, 627,000 people are projected to die from breast cancer this year alone. The silver lining is that with early detection and proper care, breast cancer is among the most treatable forms of the disease. In the U.S., breast cancer deaths dropped by 40% between 1989 and 2015, thanks to better screening and access to care — but a large body of research suggests that widespread adoption...
Source: TIME: Health - October 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized breast cancer news Source Type: news

Teenagers who eat the standard Western diet found to have increased risk of mental health challenges
(Natural News) The notion that the Western diet is not ideal is nothing new; the “standard” dietary habits in the U.S. and other westernized nations have been linked to major diseases like cancer, heart disease, diabetes, obesity and more. But new research has shown that for teenagers in particular, the average American diet could be... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More Young Americans Are Dying From Drugs, Alcohol and Suicide
Young Americans are dying in rising numbers because of drugs, alcohol and suicide, according to new federal data. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) issued its annual comprehensive health and mortality report, which analyzes trends in death rates by cause and demographic. Drugs, alcohol and suicide, the report says, have contributed to the first drops in U.S. life expectancy since 1993. While U.S. life expectancy rose from 77.8 to 78.6 years between 2006 and 2016, the trend reversed during the end of the decade, leading to a 0.3-year decline between 2014 and ...
Source: TIME: Health - September 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Drugs, Alcohol and Suicide Are Killing So Many Young Americans That the Country ’s Average Lifespan Is Falling
Young Americans are dying in rising numbers because of drugs, alcohol and suicide, according to new federal data. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) issued its annual comprehensive health and mortality report, which analyzes trends in death rates by cause and demographic. Drugs, alcohol and suicide, the report says, have contributed to the first drops in U.S. life expectancy since 1993. While U.S. life expectancy rose from 77.8 to 78.6 years between 2006 and 2016, the trend reversed during the end of the decade, leading to a 0.3-year decline between 2014 and ...
Source: TIME: Health - September 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Social support is critical to life satisfaction in young patients with cancer
(Wiley) Among adolescents and young adults with cancer, social support was the most decisive factor associated with life satisfaction. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that social support and how young cancer patients process the experience of being ill have far greater importance for their life satisfaction than sociodemographic or medical factors do. September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news