Vascular regeneration for ischemic retinopathies: Hope from cell therapies.

Vascular regeneration for ischemic retinopathies: Hope from cell therapies. Curr Eye Res. 2019 Oct 14;: Authors: Bertelli PM, Pedrini E, Guduric-Fuchs J, Peixoto E, Pathak V, Stitt AW, Medina RJ Abstract Retinal vascular diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, retinal vein occlusion, ocular ischemic syndrome and ischemic optic neuropathy, are leading causes of vision impairment and blindness. Whilst drug, laser or surgery-based treatments for the late stage complications of many of these diseases are available, interventions that target the early vasodegenerative stages are lacking. Progressive vasculopathy and ensuing ischemia is an underpinning pathology in many of these diseases, leading to hypoperfusion, hypoxia, and ultimately pathological neovascularization and/or edema in the retina and other ocular tissues, such as the optic nerve and iris. Therefore, repairing the retinal vasculature may prevent progression of ischemic retinopathies into late stage vascular complications. Various cell types have been explored for their vascular repair potential. Endothelial progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are studied for their potential to integrate with the damaged retinal vasculature and limit ischemic injury. Clinical trials for some of these cell types have confirmed safety and feasibility in the treatment of ischemic diseases, including some retinopathies. Another promising avenue is mo...
Source: Current Eye Research - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Curr Eye Res Source Type: research

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In conclusion, high-dose NR induces the onset of WAT dysfunction, which may in part explain the deterioration of metabolic health. Towards a Rigorous Definition of Cellular Senescence https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/towards-a-rigorous-definition-of-cellular-senescence/ The accumulation of lingering senescent cells is a significant cause of aging, disrupting tissue function and generating chronic inflammation throughout the body. Even while the first senolytic drugs capable of selectively destroying these cells already exist, and while a number of biotech companies are working on the productio...
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Reena Goswami1, Gayatri Subramanian2, Liliya Silayeva1, Isabelle Newkirk1, Deborah Doctor1, Karan Chawla2, Saurabh Chattopadhyay2, Dhyan Chandra3, Nageswararao Chilukuri1 and Venkaiah Betapudi1,4* 1Neuroscience Branch, Research Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen, MD, United States 2Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH, United States 3Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY, United States 4Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Clev...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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