Up To 25 Cups Of Coffee A Day Still Safe For Heart Health, Study Says

(CNN) — Coffee lovers might be able to breathe a sigh of relief — a new study found that drinking even large amounts of the caffeinated beverage won’t stiffen arteries and harm your heart. Aficionados have been getting mixed messages about their favorite drink, with some research suggesting that drinking coffee can improve health while other studies advise people to cut down on their consumption. Previous studies suggested that coffee can cause a stiffening of the arteries, putting pressure on the heart and increasing the likelihood of stroke or heart attack. But a new study, funded in part by the British Heart Foundation, found that drinking five cups of coffee a day was no worse for the arteries than drinking less than one cup. The study of more than 8,000 people across the United Kingdom also found that even those who drank up to 25 cups a day were no more likely to experience stiffening of the arteries than someone drinking less than a cup a day. In the latest study, which is being presented Monday at the British Cardiovascular Society conference, scientists from Queen Mary University of London divided 8,412 people into three groups, with each self-reporting its coffee consumption. The first group was made up of people who said they drank less than one cup of coffee a day; the second included those who drank between one and three cups; and the third group included those who drank more than three, with some in the group drinking up to 25 cups a day. Peopl...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Coffee Source Type: news

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This study defines a new clinically relevant concept of T-cell senescence-mediated inflammatory responses in the pathophysiology of abnormal glucose homeostasis. We also found that T-cell senescence is associated with systemic inflammation and alters hepatic glucose homeostasis. The rational modulation of T-cell senescence would be a promising avenue for the treatment or prevention of diabetes. Intron Retention via Alternative Splicing as a Signature of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/03/intron-retention-via-alternative-splicing-as-a-signature-of-aging/ In recent years researchers have inv...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Sound, rhythm, rate, structure, function – countless features of the heart are measured to keep it healthy for as long as possible. Recently, an army of digital health technologies joined the forces of traditional preventive tools in cardiology to counter stroke, heart attack, heart failure or any other cardiovascular risks. In the future, minuscule sensors, digital twins, and artificial intelligence could strengthen their ranks. Let’s see what the future of cardiology might look like! Fitness trackers, chatbots and A.I. against heart disease Let’s say 36-year-old Maria living in Sao Paulo in 2033 d...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Portable Diagnostics cardiology cardiovascular cardiovascular diseases digital digital twin health trackers heart heart health heart rate heart soun Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, in the Framingham Heart Study population, in the last 30 years, disease duration in persons with dementia has decreased. However, age-adjusted mortality risk has slightly decreased after 1977-1983. Consequences of such trends on dementia prevalence should be investigated. Recent Research on the Benefits of Exercise in Later Life https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/04/recent-research-on-the-benefits-of-exercise-in-later-life/ A sizable body of work points to the ability of older individuals to continue to obtain benefits through regular physical activity, and particularly in the case ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Our results link transportation noise exposure to development of obesity and suggest that combined exposure from different sources may be particularly harmful. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1910 Received: 17 March 2017 Revised: 5 October 2017 Accepted: 9 October 2017 Published: 20 November 2017 Address correspondence to A. Pyko, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Telephone: 46(0) 852487561. Email: Andrei.pyko@ki.se Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1910). The authors declare they have no actual or potential competing fina...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Long-term exposure to NO2 and road traffic noise was associated with higher risk of heart failure, mainly among men, in both single- and two-pollutant models. High exposure to both pollutants was associated with highest risk. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1272 Received: 25 October 2016 Revised: 09 August 2017 Accepted: 09 August 2017 Published: 26 September 2017 Address correspondence to M. Sørensen. Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. Telephone: +45 35257626. Email: mettes@cancer.dk Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
It’s no secret that alcohol affects our brains, and most moderate drinkers like the way it makes them feel — happier, less stressed, more sociable. Science has verified alcohol’s feel-good effect; PET scans have shown that alcohol releases endorphins (the “pleasure hormones”) which bind to opiate receptors in the brain. Although excessive drinking is linked to an increased risk of dementia, decades of observational studies have indicated that moderate drinking — defined as no more than one drink a day for women and two for men — has few ill effects. (A drink equals 1.5 ounces of 80...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Brain and cognitive health Healthy Eating Heart Health Memory Source Type: blogs
All that the doctors who treated Cincinnati, Ohio resident Otto Warmbier knew is what they had seen or maybe read in the news. They knew he had just been released on June 13 from imprisonment in North Korea where he had been held by for more than 17 months. He had been sentenced in March 2016 to 15 years of hard labor for allegedly removing a propaganda poster from a wall at a Pyongyang hotel where he had been staying. The University of Virginia honors student had been visiting the authoritarian state during a five-day trip with a group called Young Pioneer Tours, which is a group out of China – an important note. Ot...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Diabetes is an adamant condition requiring constant attention. Let me show you how technology can take the burden off the shoulders of suffering patients and their loved ones. One in eleven persons has to cope with diabetes worldwide on a daily basis  According to the latest estimates of the WHO, 422 million people suffer from diabetes worldwide – and the number is growing steadily. It means that one person in eleven has to manage the chronic condition on a daily basis, which might lead to stroke, blindness, heart attack, kidney failure or amputation. There are two types of diabetes: when the body doe...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Empowered Patients Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers chronic diabetes disease gc2 gc3 management technology Source Type: blogs
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTim...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion This valuable research aims to clarify which preventable risk factors are associated with stroke risk – knowledge that could have an effect on addressing this important global health problem. The study's strengths are that it is based on a large sample size of nearly 27,000 people from 32 countries and of different socioeconomic backgrounds. The researchers made careful attempts beforehand to calculate how many participants they would need to include to be able to reliably detect differences in risk factors. There was little missing data across the total sample – for the various diffe...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Medication Source Type: news
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