PGC-1 α sparks the fire of neuroprotection against neurodegenerative disorders.

PGC-1α sparks the fire of neuroprotection against neurodegenerative disorders. Ageing Res Rev. 2018 Mar 23;: Authors: Lv J, Jiang S, Yang Z, Hu W, Wang Z, Li T, Yang Y Abstract Recently, growing evidence has demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a superior transcriptional regulator that acts via controlling the expression of anti-oxidant enzymes and uncoupling proteins and inducing mitochondrial biogenesis, which plays a beneficial part in the central nervous system (CNS). Given the significance of PGC-1α, we summarize the current literature on the molecular mechanisms and roles of PGC-1α in the CNS. Thus, in this review, we first briefly introduce the basic characteristics regarding PGC-1α. We then depict some of its important cerebral functions and discuss upstream modulators, partners, and downstream effectors of the PGC-1α signaling pathway. Finally, we highlight recent progress in research on the involvement of PGC-1α in certain major neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs), including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Collectively, the data presented here may be useful for supporting the future potential of PGC-1α as a therapeutic target. PMID: 29580918 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Ageing Research Reviews - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Ageing Res Rev Source Type: research

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Conclusion The key problem with the ND field is the lack of understanding in the events preceding the development of protein-based markers – such as Tau – currently used to diagnose NDs. By this stage, the diseases become more difficult to treat. SncRNAs play an important regulatory role in the maintenance of the homeostatic brain. Therefore, changes in their concentration levels can be indicative of mechanistic changes that could precede protein-based markers. One single sncRNA biomarker is unlikely to differentiate between diseases. However, a combination of sncRNA biomarkers could be illustrative of the me...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
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Source: Molecules - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Conclusions In this review, we analyzed mechanisms through which mitobolites, a distinct set of mitochondria-generated metabolites, can be released from mitochondria and then act as second messengers that contribute to cellular and organismal aging by regulating longevity-defining processes outside of mitochondria. Our analysis indicates that in eukaryotes across phyla, these second messengers of cellular aging exhibit the following common features: (1) they are produced in mitochondria in response to certain changes in the nutrient, stress, proliferation or age status of the cell; it remains unknown, however, what kind o...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 20 December 2018Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Hasnaa A. Elfawy, Biswadeep DasAbstractMitochondrial function is vital for normal cellular processes. Mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress have been greatly implicated in the progression of aging, along with the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Although antioxidant therapy has been proposed for the prevention and treatment of age-related NDs, unraveling the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunct...
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
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Source: Mitochondrion - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
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Source: Biometals - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Biometals Source Type: research
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Source: Neurochemistry International - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
This study cohort is a healthy subset of the EpiPath cohort, excluding all participants with acute or chronic diseases. With a mediation analysis we examined whether CMV titers may account for immunosenescence observed in ELA. In this study, we have shown that ELA is associated with higher levels of T cell senescence in healthy participants. Not only did we find a higher number of senescent cells (CD57+), these cells also expressed higher levels of CD57, a cell surface marker for senescence, and were more cytotoxic in ELA compared to controls. Control participants with high CMV titers showed a higher number of senes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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