School Lunches: What can we do?

From the desk of Kim Gubbins, CPNPWe are three months into the new school year and do school lunches have you stressed, bored and lacking? Are your kids already complaining about the same old same old and wishing they could just eat hot lunch pizza everyday? So, let ’s get inspired and figure out fresh new lunch ideas.I know schools are working harder at feeding our children a healthier lunch, but let me honest, most school cafeterias are serving pizza, burgers and fried chicken patties on a daily basis. And with 17%-20% of children in the United States being obese, I feel that packing lunch is a significantly healthier option (if possible!). I realize this may not be able to happen on a daily basis for all family situations, but even if it could happen 1-2 days per week, it would be great!Important considerations when packing school lunch:1.   Consider the school ’s food allergy restrictions. We need to keep all kids safe at school, so make sure you know the school policy on peanuts, tree nuts, etc.2.   Model my plate! Trying to pack a balanced lunch is important! (http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/myplate.html)3.   Think outside of the typical brown bag lunch. A warm, smashed, PB and J on white bread is a thing of the past. Get creative because your children will love it!4.   If you ’re eating well---you are performing well and learningwell! Many research studies support this idea. I always te...
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Food Allergies Healthy Habits Source Type: news

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Epidemiological studies indicate that the population-level burden of food allergy is greatest among urban, predominantly Black communities. However, the etiology of such racial differences remains unclear. Studies examining environmental determinants of other chronic conditions (i.e. asthma, obesity, diabetes) suggest that differential exposure to particulate air pollution may contribute to racial differences in health outcomes.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
This article brings the current recommendations and recent research together and organizes them for clinicians in pediatrics to enable them to understand and convey this information to parents of infants.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants - Category: Primary Care Tags: CME: Pediatrics Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 December 2019Source: Journal of Food Composition and AnalysisAuthor(s): Kathryn M CooperAbstractThis work presents a novel, comprehensive ingredient co-occurrence network of foods in the United States from the Open Food Database. This network, which contains over 69,000 ingredients and 2 million ingredient co-occurrence relationships, provides a glimpse into the current use of common ingredients for food production and distribution in the United States. Understanding food intake behaviors from this data-driven perspective opens up new avenues for precision health and wellness, for exam...
Source: Journal of Food Composition and Analysis - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Background: Allergic respiratory disorders often co-exist, but little is known about their specific patterns, exposure profiles or COPD risk.Objectives: To identify latent patterns of allergic respiratory disorders and their exposure profiles and COPD risk.Methods: Latent patterns of current asthma, hayfever, eczema, food allergy with their ages at onset, chronic cough, chronic sputum and allergic sensitivities were identified, using latent class analysis (LCA), among 3608 participants from the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (mean age: 53 years), and cross-sectionally associated with exposures and COPD risk.Results: F...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: research
In the beginning, there were single-cell bacteria. They were the only life on earth for billions of years, then larger cells evolved, then multicellular organisms, and then plants and animals. But the bacteria never went away, and all organisms, including us humans, have had to learn to live with them. Today, the lessons they are teaching us could change the trajectory of human health for generations. When bacteria were first discovered more than three centuries ago, most attention was on the ones we fought, which caused diseases like cholera, typhoid and tuberculosis. Through vaccines and antibiotics, we have made amazing...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized medicine Source Type: news
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — Toxic heavy metals damaging to your baby’s brain development are likely in the baby food you are feeding your infant, according to a new investigation published Thursday. Tests of 168 baby foods from major manufacturers in the US found 95% contained lead, 73% contained arsenic, 75% contained cadmium and 32% contained mercury. One fourth of the foods contained all four heavy metals. One in five baby foods tested had over 10 times the 1-ppb limit of lead endorsed by public health advocates, although experts agree that no level of lead is safe. The results mimicked a previous&nb...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Consumer Featured Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Source Type: news
Alessandro Poggi1*, Roberto Benelli2, Roberta Venè1, Delfina Costa1, Nicoletta Ferrari1, Francesca Tosetti1 and Maria Raffaella Zocchi3 1Molecular Oncology and Angiogenesis Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy 2Immunology Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy 3Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy It is well established that natural killer (NK) cells are involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. Indeed, they can recognize molecules induced at the cell surface by stress signals ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Major review calls for new approach to food allergy research focused on 'real-world' outcomes Related items fromOnMedica Parental confidence in immunisation programme ‘very high’ Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Easter travellers warned over Europe measles outbreak CAM can be lethal to children Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
In this study, we identified 37 genus-level core bacteria from feces of 101 healthy mice with different ages, sexes, and mouse strains in three previous studies. They collectively represented nearly half of the total sequences, and predominantly included carbohydrate- and amino acids-metabolizing bacteria and immunomodulatory bacteria. Among them, Anaerostipes indwelt the gut of all healthy mice. Co-abundance analysis showed that these core genera were clustered into five groups (Group C1–C5), which were ecologically related. For example, the abundances of Group C2 including probiotics Bifidobacterium and Lactobacill...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In this study, the gut microbiota of 30 LC patients and 30 healthy controls were examined via next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA and analyzed for diversity and biomarkers. We found that there was no decrease in significant microbial diversity (alpha diversity) in LC patients compared to controls (P observed = 0.1422), while the composition (beta diversity) differed significantly between patients and controls (phylum [stress = 0.153], class [stress = 0.16], order [stress = 0.146], family [stress = 0.153]). Controls had a higher abundance of the bacterial phylum Actinobacteria and genus Bifidobacterium, while patients wi...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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